Preserving Yesterday, Enriching Today, Inspiring Tomorrow

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December 24 & 25

All locations of the Library will be closed December 24 & 25.  However you can still access great books, video and audiobooks on our site.

 

 

 

Have you used Hoopla?  We have some great suggestions over on our 25 Days of e-Christmas blog.  Hoopla content is always available!  No waiting and no fines!

 

 

 

 

 

Looking for a great read?  Many of your favorite authors and hot new titles are over at our ebook site Overdrive.   Can’t decide what to read?  Check out the titles on our Hot Reads blog or A Wynk, A Blynk and a Nod to Books for children’s books.

 

 

 

Hot New Reads – December

The Boston Girl by Anita Diamant

Addie Baum is The Boston Girl, born in 1900 to immigrant parents who were unprepared for and suspicious of America and its effect on their three daughters. Growing up in the North End, then a teeming multicultural neighborhood, Addie’s intelligence and curiosity take her to a world her parents can’t imagine—a world of short skirts, movies, celebrity culture, and new opportunities for women. Addie wants to finish high school and dreams of going to college. She wants a career and to find true love.

Eighty-five-year-old Addie tells the story of her life to her twenty-two-year-old granddaughter, who has asked her “How did you get to be the woman you are today.” She begins in 1915, the year she found her voice and made friends who would help shape the course of her life. From the one-room tenement apartment she shared with her parents and two sisters, to the library group for girls she joins at a neighborhood settlement house, to her first, disastrous love affair, Addie recalls her adventures with compassion for the naïve girl she was and a wicked sense of humor.

Written with the same attention to historical detail and emotional resonance that made Anita Diamant’s previous novels bestsellers, The Boston Girl is a moving portrait of one woman’s complicated life in twentieth century America, and a fascinating look at a generation of women finding their places in a changing world.

 

 

Vanessa and Her Sister by Priya Parmar

For readers of The Paris Wife and Loving Frank, here is the first novel to offer a fascinating glimpse into the adult lives of sisters Virginia Woolf and Vanessa Bell, set against the backdrop of a new era—early 1900s London—and focusing on the perennially controversial and popular circle of […]

By |December 10th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post, Hot New Reads|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Covington Library Stats & Stories – One Year Later

Covington Library Stats & Stories – Snapshots of the revitalization of Covington Library One Year Later

The Covington Library is one of those unique places. Smack in the center of an urban renewal. It’s one of the few places in Northern Kentucky where you can see people struggling to survive sitting next to a Federal judge. All are welcomed, none are judged. This month marks one year since the Covington Library has been fully operational after a 24 month expansion and renovation. A few questioned the need for expansion; citing books were a thing of the past. That couldn’t be further from the case. Since 2013, the Covington Library has seen a tremendous amount of use and has radically impacted the community and the people it serves.

The following is a brief snapshot on how the Covington Library remains relevant not only by providing books, materials and services, but also by being a critical part of the Northern Kentucky Community.

Stats and stories

The Kenton County Public Library records statistics on the fiscal year, beginning July 1 and ending June 30 of the following calendar year. Here is a look at the statistics for the Covington Library for July 1, 2013 through June 30, 2014:

Circulation of items for adults: 413,076 (up 31%)
Circulation of items for children: 92,461 (up 25%)
Overall circulation of items including books, movies, music , magazines and more: 505,537 (up 29%)
1,618 programs for adults, teens and children were offered including computer classes, book discussions, job skills education, storytimes, literacy enrichment and more. 37,595 people attended these programs.
Volunteers contributed 2,516 hours to the Covington Library, a value of $45,061.56
Staff answered 136,104 reference questions.
From July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2014, 407,516 people visited the Covington Library.

Stories and […]

Everything Old is New Again

A Wynk, a Blynk and a Nod to Books Suitable for Holiday Gift-Giving

The holidays are right around the corner, and chances are you’re looking for great gift ideas. You’ve come to the right place. There’s nothing like a classic book, and this year there’s a bumper crop of beautiful new anniversary editions sure to make adults nostalgic and kids engaged.
Reissued Classics and Anniversary Editions
The Best Christmas Pageant Ever by Barbara Robinson

Robinson’s classic story of the Herdman children first appeared in 1971. A picture book version is also available.

 

 

The Book of Three by Lloyd Alexander

Originally published in 1964, The Book of Three is the first book in the Newbery Award winning fantasy series.

 

 

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl, illus. by Quentin Blake

Can Charlie Bucket really be fifty years old? Yes he is, and everyone can celebrate by reading this 50th anniversary edition printed on candy colored pages.

 

 

The Christmas Alphabet: Deluxe 20th Anniversary Edition by Robert Sabuda

This book launched Sabuda’s career in 1994. The anniversary edition of this famous pop-up classic is a joy to open.

 

 

Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed by Eileen Christelow

Included in this 25th anniversary edition is a free audio download, a “How to Draw a Monkey” activity, and music and lyrics for the much-loved song.

 

 

Guess How Much I Love You by Sam McBratney, illus. by Anita Jeram

First published in the United Kingdom in 1994, this cherished tale now celebrates twenty years.

 

 

Harriet the Spy by Louise Fitzhugh

This 50th anniversary edition features a map of Harriet’s spy route and a section in which grown-ups, including many writers, share their feelings about the book.

 

 

James Herriot’s Treasury for Children by James Herriot, illus. by Ruth Brown and Peter Barrett

Originally published in […]

Hot New Reads – November

Color Blind by Colby Marshall

There is something unusual about Dr. Jenna Ramey’s brain, a rare perceptual quirk that punctuates her experiences with flashes of color. They are hard to explain: red can mean anger, or love, or strength. But she can use these spontaneous mental associations, understand and interpret them enough to help her read people and situations in ways others cannot. As an FBI forensic psychiatrist, she used it to profile and catch criminals. Years ago, she used it to save her own family from her charming, sociopathic mother.

Now, the FBI has detained a mass murderer and called for Jenna’s help. Upon interrogation she learns that, behind bars or not, he holds the power to harm more innocents—and is obsessed with gaining power over Jenna herself. He has a partner still on the loose. And Jenna’s unique mind, with its strange and subtle perceptions, may be all that can prevent a terrifying reality…

 

Citizen Coke: The Making of Coca-Cola Capitalism by Bartow J. Elmore

How did Coca-Cola build a global empire by selling a low-price concoction of mostly sugar, water, and caffeine? The easy answer is advertising, but the real formula to Coke s success was its strategy, from the start, to offload costs and risks onto suppliers, franchisees, and the government. For most of its history the company owned no bottling plants, water sources, cane- or cornfields. A lean operation, it benefited from public goods like cheap municipal water and curbside recycling programs. Its huge appetite for ingredients gave it outsized influence on suppliers and congressional committees. This was Coca-Cola capitalism.

In this new history Bartow J. Elmore explores Coke through its ingredients, showing how the company secured massive quantities of coca leaf, caffeine, sugar, […]

By |November 6th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post, Hot New Reads|Tags: , , |1 Comment

Cincinnati Ballet’s Peter Pan Flash Ticket Giveaway

For those who never want to grow up, there’s Never Never Land. Luckily, for the Darling family children, Wendy, John and Michael, there’s Peter Pan to guide them through this magical place full of pirates and Indians and Lost Boys. The foursome (with the help of the mischievous Tinkerbell) fly to Never Never Land where the cranky pirate Captain Hook, a hungry crocodile and more adventures await. Follow along on this swashbuckling journey, past the second star to the right and straight on ’til morning, as these classic characters learn what growing up is really all about. The Kenton County Public Library would like to help one lucky winner experience Never Never Land. See the giveaway details below.

 
Tickets can be bought at the box office or by visiting the Cincinnati Ballet Website.
 

Friday, November 7 – 8:00 pm

Saturday, November 8 – 2:00 pm

Saturday, November 8 – 8:00 pm

Sunday, November 9 – 2:00 pm

 
Giveaway
The library has a voucher for two tickets to the performance time of your choice. Library employees and those living in their household cannot enter to win. A winner will be chosen randomly by the end of the day on Wednesday, Nov. 5. The winner will be announced on the Kenton County Public Library’s Facebook page and will have 24 hours to respond to claim the voucher. The voucher must be picked up at one of the Kenton County Public Library locations.

How to enter:

Comment on this post stating why you want to win.
Share this post on Facebook or Twitter and comment here stating that you did. (Entries will be verified)

 
Good luck!

By |November 4th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post||83 Comments

Top 10 reasons to have your friendly neighborhood teen librarian visit your middle and/or high school classroom

1.  Facebook may start labeling satirical posts so users don’t think they’re real, but you know who has been dedicated to information literacy and teaching students how to objectively evaluate information? Librarians.

 

 

2.  Are you a teacher looking for extra credit ideas? Some teachers include attending events at the library.

a. Covington has Write On!, a teen writers group, Sunday, September 7 at 2pm.

b.  Durr/Independence has Teen Crafternoon, an art program with lots of fun supplies.

c.  Erlanger has STEAM Explorers, whose meeting on Thursday, November 20, 2014, 7 – 8pm  will be all about computer programming with the Scratch! programming method. 
d.  …and tons more at each location!

3.  Do you want your students to research current topics and events from multiple angles? The Opposing Viewpoints database lets users browse issues to explore different positions on topics.

4.  Have an activity or assignment that takes up about half a class period? The librarian can take the other half!

5.  KCPL has an AWESOME* and FREE database you can get to from any computer with internet access and a KCPL Library Card that has all kinds of test prep: ACT, AP, SAT… You create a free account in the database and can stop and come back to their timed practice tests at any time. The tests are also scored, including explaining why answers are correct. A librarian can come and show your students all about this service, or if possible, we can arrange to have you visit our on-site computer labs and get library cards.

6.  In most situations, a visiting public librarian does not mind if you leave for a few minutes to have your own bathroom break.

 

 

 

7.  If you teach in Kenton County, you can get a KCPL teacher card, no matter where you […]

By |October 23rd, 2014|Categories: Featured Post, teens||0 Comments

Libraries Change Lives

Add your name to the Friends of Kentucky Libraries “Declaration for the Right to Libraries”

Sign the Declaration for the Right to Libraries Today
In the spirit of the United States Declaration of Independence and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, we believe that libraries are essential to a democratic society. Every day, in countless communities across our nation and the world, millions of children, students and adults use libraries to learn, grow and achieve their dreams.

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIBRARIES EMPOWER THE INDIVIDUAL
LIBRARIES SUPPORT LITERACY AND LIFELONG LEARNING
LIBRARIES STRENGTHEN FAMILIES
LIBRARIES ARE THE GREAT EQUALIZER
LIBRARIES BUILD COMMUNITIES
LIBRARIES PROTECT OUR RIGHT TO KNOW
LIBRARIES STRENGTHEN OUR NATION
LIBRARIES ADVANCE RESEARCH AND SCHOLARSHIP
LIBRARIES HELP US TO BETTER UNDERSTAND EACH OTHER
LIBRARIES PRESERVE OUR NATION’S CULTURAL HERITAGE  

By |October 21st, 2014|Categories: Featured Post||0 Comments

Job Skills Help at the Library

Do you see yourself or a friend in any of the following scenarios?

Downsized professional?
Stay at home parent returning to the workforce?
Thinking about changing careers?
Recent college graduate and no job?
Looking to grow your current job skills?

Then think of the Kenton County Public Library as Job Search Central. The library has a myriad of resources available to aid you in your job search and help you grow your career skills. Turn to the library’s Job Search Central web site to find  to find the best and most up-to-date books on the Job Search Hunt, Career Change, writing powerful resumes, composing strong cover letters and developing fresh interviewing skills. The site will also connect you with local networking organizations, upcoming job fairs, and links to the most respected on-line job hunting and career assessment sites. Register for one of the library’s Job Search One-on-One sessions to get specialized help in a small group setting from an expert staff member. Learn about job opportunities and community resources available to you.

If you know someone struggling to gain critical computer skills, the library also offers regular live classes for First Time Computer Users, plus sessions on MS Word, Excel & PowerPoint. Finding it difficult to locate the time and money needed to train yourself in pricey software applications? You can take advanced classes in computer applications, business, design, personal development and other areas, via Gale Courses on the library’s web site for free. The classes are self-paced and require your library card number and PIN.

Save time, save money and get the support you need for your job search at the Kenton County Public Library today!

 

By |October 17th, 2014|Categories: KCPL||0 Comments

The Holidays are a Time to Gather Family History

Dan Knecht of Covington, Kentucky can trace his family roots back to the 1600’s. “I was what you would call an old folks child, always hanging around our elderly family members and learned a lot from them.” Knecht has been working on his family tree for more than 30 years. He credits the Kenton County Public Library for giving him some of the tools and resources needed in his search.

The Kenton County Public Library wants to remind everyone that the holidays are a great time to connect with family members and start writing down their family history. “Many people really don’t think about how much information their grandparents or other elderly family members have until it’s too late,” said Elaine Kuhn who oversees the Library’s Local History and Genealogy department. “We want to encourage people to take a few minutes during the holidays to reconnect with their family members and ask about their history. Should you or anyone else in your family want to get started tracing your family heritage, having this information will make the initial search much easier.”

While it may be overwhelming to think about how to get started, Mr. Knecht suggested doing a few simple things to get started. “In addition to talking to your relatives, you’ll want to look through family documents and photos.” Mr. Knecht states he was given hundreds of postcards that were a great source of information. “The postcards not only had beautiful pictures on them, the written part would sometimes offer insight into other family members. For instance, in one postcard there was mention of a baby being born. You can look up the birth records around that time and match the last names and this […]

By |October 15th, 2014|Categories: Press Releases||0 Comments