Preserving Yesterday, Enriching Today, Inspiring Tomorrow


13 Reasons to Watch Fuller House

By Gina Stegner

I can’t begin to tell you how excited I was to find out Fuller House, basically an extension of Full House, was being made last year. I binge watched the new show on Netflix in two days. When I heard we would find out who D.J. Tanner married, how she became single, what had happened in Kimmy Gibbler’s life, see Stephanie all grown up, hear the jokes about Michelle and see Danny, Uncle Jessy and Joey again I thought… “Have Mercy!” I grew up with Full House, my kids watched reruns. I could relate to the Tanner girls. And now, D.J. is all grown up and a mom just like me. Pretty cool.

To make it even better, Fuller House is releasing a second season on Dec. 9 on Netflix. According to TV Guide, D.J. will continue to find herself in a love triangle, Stephanie will find a weird new boyfriend and Kimmy will try to move on from her ex-husband. So why should you watch?

The 13 top reasons, in no certain order, to watch the second season of Fuller House on Netflix:

Rumor has it that the New Kids on the Block will appear in at least one episode.
Candace Cameron Bure (D.J. Tanner) hints that we will learn more about her and Kimmy’s kids this season.
D.J. will choose between her high school sweetheart Steve and work romance Matt.
D.J.’s ex-boyfriend Nelson, played by someone other than the original Nelson, will make an appearance on the show.
We will finally meet Kimmy Gibbler’s brother.
D.J.’s ex-best friend Kathy Santoni (also portrayed by a different actor) will make an appearance.
We will meet Joey’s wife and kids.
Kimmy’s brother is rumored to be Stephanie’s boyfriend (Oh Mylanta!).
We […]

Top 5 Hiking Trails in Northern Kentucky and Cincinnati

The weather has finally changed and the cool temperatures are here at last.  That also means the beautiful changing of leaves and my favorite time to hike.  I greatly enjoy long backpacking hikes but as many people know, it is hard to find the time.  One of my favorite places to hike is the Red River Gorge, but that is about a two hour drive. So I compiled a short list of my top favorite five local hikes that are closer to the Cincinnati area.  If you only have a few hours or a whole day, try to escape to the woods and enjoy the splendor of the fall season.

I hope you find the time to enjoy the splendor of nature in the fall.  It can be quite fleeting.  Dress with layers because it may be cool under those trees.


5)  Big Bone Lick Trails:  3380 Beaver Rd. Union, KY.

There are a choice of 5 trails ranging in length and difficulty.  You can also do them all in the 4.5 mile Discovery Trail.  The trails run through woodlands, grasslands, woody savanna, the salt-sulfur springs, and the bison viewing area.




4) Fort Thomas Landmark Tree Trail:  89 Carmel Manor Rd. Fort Thomas, KY 41075

This short loop offers great scenery and views across to Ohio.  It consists of 14 landmark trees and the colorful foliage should be a treat at this time of year.  It is a short 1.1 miles but moderate to difficult due to the few steep hills.  Dogs allowed.



3)  Devou Park Trail:  460 Deverill St, Ludlow, KY 41016

Devou Park Trail consists of several fun trails.  You can view train tracks right over the trail and know that it should be an interesting hike.  This is […]

October Hot Reads

News of the World by Paulette Jiles

In the wake of the Civil War, Captain Jefferson Kyle Kidd travels through northern Texas, giving live readings from newspapers to paying audiences hungry for news of the world. An elderly widower who has lived through three wars and fought in two of them, the captain enjoys his rootless, solitary existence.

In Wichita Falls, he is offered a $50 gold piece to deliver a young orphan to her relatives in San Antonio. Four years earlier, a band of Kiowa raiders killed Johanna’s parents and sister; sparing the little girl, they raised her as one of their own. Recently rescued by the U.S. army, the ten-year-old has once again been torn away from the only home she knows.

Their 400-mile journey south through unsettled territory and unforgiving terrain proves difficult and at times dangerous. Johanna has forgotten the English language, tries to escape at every opportunity, throws away her shoes, and refuses to act “civilized.” Yet as the miles pass, the two lonely survivors tentatively begin to trust each other, forming a bond that marks the difference between life and death in this treacherous land.

Arriving in San Antonio, the reunion is neither happy nor welcome. The captain must hand Johanna over to an aunt and uncle she does not remember—strangers who regard her as an unwanted burden. A respectable man, Captain Kidd is faced with a terrible choice: abandon the girl to her fate or become—in the eyes of the law—a kidnapper himself.

The Mothers by Brit Bennett

Set within a contemporary black community in Southern California, Brit Bennett’s mesmerizing first novel is an emotionally perceptive story about community, love, and ambition. It begins with a secret.

“All good secrets have a taste before […]

By |October 7th, 2016|Categories: Featured Post, Hot New Reads||0 Comments

Halloween Takes over the Kenton County Public Library

DIY Halloween Makeup Demo
Durr Branch, 1992 Walton-Nicholson Road, Independence
Sunday, October 9, 2-4 pm
Using only store-bought Halloween supplies, makeup artist Beth Parks will demo five different Halloween makeup styles including a sugar skull, comic book character, mermaid, cheetah and classic witch.

Eggbot Pumpkin Decorating
Erlanger Branch Library, 1992 Kenton Lands Road
Monday, October 10, 6-8 pm
Decorate pumpkins with an Eggbot. Mini pumpkins will be provided while supplies last.

Halloween Happening!
Erlanger Branch Library, 1992 Kenton Lands Road
Thursday, October 20, 7-8 pm
Ghosts and goblins are invited to have a hauntingly good time at the Library. We’ll share some scary stories, create an edible Halloween craft and play games for prizes.

Pumpkin Decorating
Erlanger Branch Library, 1992 Kenton Lands Road
Friday, October 21, 5:30-7:30
Carve and pumpkins at the library. Pumpkins and supplies will be provided while supplies last.

Make and Take – Trick-or-Treat Bags
Covington Branch, 502 Scott Boulevard
Saturday, Oct. 22, 11-noon, ages 4-12
Prepare for Halloween by creating your very own trick-or-treat bags.

Campfire Stories
Durr Branch, 1992 Walton-Nicholson Road, Independence
Friday, October 28, 7-8:30 pm
Mosey on up to the campfire for a night of spooky stories, s’mores and popcorn.

Covington Branch, 502 Scott Boulevard
Saturday, October 29, noon-8 pm
The Zombie Outbreak Film Fest will run from noon to 5. Little Zombies and their walking dads and momsters are invited for an afternoon of games, crafts and zombie makeup from 3 to 5 p.m. The Zombie Walk and costume contests will begin at 5. The teen only Zombie Prom will run from 6-8 p.m. Permission slips required for the prom.

Haunted Library
Durr Branch, 1992 Walton-Nicholson Road, Independence
Saturday, October 29, 2016 5:30 PM-8:30 PM
Sunday, October 30, 2016 2:00 PM-4:00 PM
Thrills, chills and laughs await all who dare to enter our family-friendly Halloween experience! The haunted wrecked ship is sure to provide a scare. Please […]

By |October 7th, 2016|Categories: Featured Post, Press Releases||0 Comments

A Wynk, a Blynk and a Nod to Books About Fall

“Goodbye Summer … Hello Autumn”

This is the perfect book to introduce our next blog entry on new books about fall – the season and the holidays that come with it … so perfect, in fact, that we even stole the title! This stunning picture book by Kenard Pak follows a young girl as she converses with nature and greets all the signs of the coming of fall. The gorgeous watercolor and pencil illustrations, all done in double-page spreads, evoke that childlike sense of wonder at the changing of the seasons. This one is not to be missed. Enjoy all of our selections … and enjoy the season!
New Books for Younger Readers
Amazing Autumn by Jennifer Marino Walters, illus. by John Nez

This picture book introduces the reader to autumn and also includes the concepts of colors, shapes, and sizes. The text engages the reader by asking questions and encouraging participation.



The Autumn Visitors by Karel Hayes

This is the fourth and final book in Hayes’ Visitor series. The bear family experiences autumn in New England in this nearly wordless picture book accompanied by pen and ink and watercolor illustrations.



Bella’s Fall Coat by Lynn Plourde, illus. by Susan Gal

This is a beautiful story about the fall season and a little girl who has outgrown her favorite coat made by her grandmother. Bella, however, must learn to deal with this change. The collage illustrations are visually appealing and convey the sense of autumn.



Birdie’s Happiest Halloween by Sujean Rim

Birdie loves everything about autumn and especially Halloween, though this year she’s having trouble deciding what to be. A trip to the museum provides inspiration! The ending is surprising but fitting, especially considering this year’s political climate. The childlike illustrations suit the fall […]

Covington Latin 9th Grade Ancient Day Research Project

Pathfinder for successful research

Catalog Searching
Go to the Kenton County Public Library website. Click on Catalog Search.  Type in your search term by title of book, subject, keyword or author and limit your search.  Look through your search results and select one.  If the material fits your research needs then you can place a hold on the item, click place hold and enter your library card number and your PIN (usually the last four numbers of your phone number or your birth year).  Select which Library you want to pick up your item (Covington, Durr or Erlanger) and click Submit. You can also access our e-book collection through our catalog, just look for (electronic resource) after the title of the item.
Click on E-Media. Click on Overdrive eBooks to check-out e-books or Reference & Research eBooks to search for articles in reference books. Both cover a wide range of topics. If you don’t find a book on your topic, ask us how to recommend e-books on Overdrive!
Click on Research & Learning.  These are the databases that the library subscribes to for library patron’s research needs.  You can click on alphabetical listing of resources if you would like.  Depending upon your research topic, you will have many databases to choose from.  You will need to enter your library card if you are outside a library building. Most databases have tools for you to find the MLA citation for any article you find. You can also print and email the articles.

Research Help Britannica Research Tools and Materials Britannica is a good source for getting a basic overview of your topic, finding quality websites and reviewing links to further reading. They have a specific site for research on countries.

Good general databases to search: All […]

By |October 4th, 2016|Categories: Uncategorized||0 Comments

Election Year Children’s Books

Duck for President by Doreen Cronin ; illustrated by Betsy Lewin

From the duo that brought us Click, Clack, Moo, Farmer Brown’s Duck pursues the highest office in the land.



President Taft is Stuck in the Bath by Mac Barnett ; illustrated by Chris Van Dusen

This is a fictionalized account of President William Howard Taft, a man of great stature, who according to some got stuck in his bath on his inauguration day. Others say it happened later in his term, while many say Taft never got stuck at all. Nevertheless, this is a fun read about our 27th president!

Lillian’s right to vote : a celebration of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 by Jonah Winter

A 50th anniversary tribute to the Voting Rights Act of 1965 finds an elderly woman reflecting on her family’s history, from the passage of the 15th Amendment through her participation in the protest march from Selma to Montgomery.


Of Thee I Sing : a Letter to My Daughters by Barack Obama ; illustrated by Loren Long

Illustrated by local artist, Loren Long, this book is a tribute to thirteen great Americans and their achievements, including the patriotism of George Washington, the courage of Jackie Robinson, and the strength of Helen Keller. This is a very moving book with stunning illustrations.

My Name Is James Madison Hemings by Jonah Winter

This historical picture book about the life of the child of Thomas Jefferson and his slave, Sally Hemings, brings to light the many contradictions in Jefferson s life and legacy.


Have a Mice Flight! Lindsey Leavitt ; illustrated by Ag Ford

This is the third book in the Commander in Cheese chapter book series about Ava and Dean Squeakerton and the rest of their mice family who live […]

A Few Great Local Reading Spots You Should Try

The equinox is upon us and with it the official end of summer and the end of the summer reading season. It’s the end of beach reads, the end of long audiobooks for summer road trips, and the end of filling up our Kindles with all the books that didn’t fit in our carry-on bags. It’s the time when we say goodbye to the freedoms of summer vacation and get back to the daily grind of work and school and life. But, September also seems to be the time when we lose something beyond the hit we take to our free time. It’s also the time when we lose something less quantifiable, something I would refer to as the spirit of summer reading.

After all, more time spent reading isn’t the only benefit summer vacations provide to our reading lives. Summer vacations also involve travel and this traveling allows us the physical space in which to immerse ourselves in the narrative of a book in a way we may struggle to do in our day to day reading lives. When we have the opportunity to step out of our usual places of home, work, and school, we aren’t just allowing our bodies to wander, but our minds as well. When we read in a new location we are setting the tone for our reading experience, one that allows us the opportunity to open our minds to new ideas and helps us to reach that ultimate goal of every reader: being totally “lost in a book”.

It seems a shame, then, that this sort of escape has been limited to only one brief part of our year. After all, we may not have the freedom to schedule […]

By |September 22nd, 2016|Categories: Adults, Around the Community, KCPL||1 Comment

How to Prep for Your Child’s Senior Year

Okay, I admit it… this title is misleading. My daughter Andi is a senior in high school and I’m not really sure what the best way to prep for senior year is but I can tell you some of the do’s and don’ts we have learned along the way. I will say you should start preparing before freshman year even starts.

Draft a plan for the next four years that includes what classes your student will take and when. Make sure you cover all of the requirements and then figure out what electives your child might want to take. Andi changed her mind throughout the years on the electives but at least we had a plan and knew exactly what had to be taken to meet her graduation requirements.
Decide with your child if they will take advanced or college placement classes and do your research. Not all colleges accept AP credits and even some of the credits accepted do not actually give you the general study credit you need. Your teen must pass the AP test, a college exam, at the end of the year to even receive the credits. Although some colleges accept a weighted GPA (a B is an A if it’s an AP course), not all colleges do. Since high school students are taking college level courses in the 10th and 11th grades, they don’t always score as high as they would if it was a regular course. This will impact their GPA. Along with your student, decide if you want to focus on college credits, rigor or GPA.

Most colleges require students to have two consecutive years of a foreign language in high school. Think about this when scheduling freshman […]

The Spanish Flu Pandemic of 1918-1919 in Northern Kentucky

We are creeping into that time of the year again: autumn. Autumn is all kinds of fun: pumpkin-flavored everything, apple cider, trick-or-treating, and a crisp, cool air that we are always pining for following the dog days of summer. Cool weather shoos us inside more often than summer, however, and germs are more easily spread in close proximity to others. Cue flu season, that nasty fact of life that persists from roughly October to March. Ninety-eight years ago this month, the country at large was experiencing one of the most severe outbreaks of flu in its history. Cue the constant hand-washing, and stock up on hand sanitizer, because we are about to venture into a brief, local history of the Spanish Flu Pandemic of 1918-1919.

Influenza comes with a slew of uncomfortable symptoms that we also associate with the common cold, but multiplied in intensity. Influenza can be life threatening to those with comprised immune systems such as the elderly and very young. Between three to five million severe cases of influenza occur each year throughout the world, with death tolls from the flu, or complications from it, ranging from 250,000 to 500,000 worldwide (1). Some years, however, the primary strain of influenza is particularly virulent and panic-inducing: for example, the Swine Flu Pandemic of 2009. The fall of 1918 happened to bring with it one of those flu strains, and was quite possibly the largest outbreak of disease in the 20th century United States.

Panic Ensues

The Public Health Service began requiring states to report cases of flu starting on September 27, 1918, coincidentally the date that influenza is estimated to have arrived in the state of Kentucky (2). The first newspaper reported death from […]