Preserving Yesterday, Enriching Today, Inspiring Tomorrow

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Library Providing Services at Home

Library Providing Services at Home

About to celebrate her 90th birthday, Mrs. Jackie Linneman can honestly say she has had a lifelong relationship with the public library system.  An avid reader from a very young age, Jackie fondly recalls her trips to the former location of the public library in Covington.  In fact, the Carnegie Library at 10th and Scott was her first library.

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By |February 6th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post|Tags: , |0 Comments

100 Years Ago, Latonia Jockey Reached Horse Racing’s Pinnacle

 

On May 27, 1914 a record crowd gathered at the historic Epsom Downs in England for the annual running of the world’s greatest horse race, the English Derby.  The dramatic death of suffragette Emily Davison on the track the year prior and the nearly unprecedented 30 horse field drew a large crowd who knew that quite anything could happen at the annual event.[1]  The tension mounted precipitously at the post line as the horses waited for the starter’s signal.  Matt McGee, an American jockey born and raised in Covington sitting atop of his fine colt Durbar II, stared down the track towards the outside rail and saw the crowd favorite Kennymore growing anxious for the start.  At 9-4 odds, and with Europe’s top jockey and future racing Hall of Famer Frank O’Neill aboard, the horse was thought to be shoo-in for victory, even with the crowded field.   The other rival for the title, Brakespear, owned by none other than the King of England himself, waited patiently close to the inside rail.  The 20 minutes standing at the line must have seemed like an eternity for the horse, however, as he frequently backed away from the starting tape.  The signal to go caught Brakespear off-guard and led to a poor start while the anxious Kennymore took off perpendicular to the rest of the field, racing directly towards the inside rail.

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By |April 11th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post|Tags: , , , |Comments Off

7 Last Minute Gift Ideas

It’s December 23rd and you just realized you are missing a gift for your great aunt or maybe it’s your nephew or the neighbor. Our staff got together and came up with a few ideas for the last minute shopper.

1. DIY gifts can be a great money saver and something the gift receiver will truly enjoy. A bag or basket of your favorite cookies, candies or nuts is easy to personalize. You can even dress it up with a final addition of your favorite local coffee or adult brew. Everyone enjoys cuddling up with a good movie or book and a bunch of treats. Sticking with the DIY theme, you can also make an ornament or a card for someone special.

2. I personally love movie night baskets. It can include one or two DVDs, candy and popcorn. You can often find a great old movie for under $10.

3. Books and music are extremely easy to find and can be very inexpensive. We suggest The Mockingjay Part 1 Soundtrack along with a Mockingjay charm or even a new set of The Hunger Games paperback books. You can personalize it by giving your favorite CD or book in hopes of introducing the gift receiver to new music or a new author.

4. A magazine subscription can be a great gift and you can often find online deals like two years for the price of one. Grab a copy of that magazine from the local store to wrap and include a note telling the gift giver they now have a subscription.

5. Chocolates, old fashioned candies, hot chocolate gift pack, coffee gift pack and gourmet food baskets are great last minute gifts too. You can often pick these up at […]

Baseball and Beer: A Look at the Wiedemann Baseball Club

Summer is almost here and with it comes a lot of baseball and fine beer. After all the two go hand and hand. So lets visit a local baseball team from the past, that was closely related to the beer industry. During the early 1900s baseball was played everywhere and by everybody even women! There were often police ordinances established to prevent youngsters from playing ball in the streets in towns and cities across the area. Many businesses had their own teams, sometimes comprised of employees while others had experienced players on their teams.

Several Breweries in the Northern Kentucky area aside from being in the beer making business also dabbled in the world of baseball. Breweries such as the Bavarian Brewing Company, Heidelberg Brewery and the George Wiedemann Brewing Company all at one point in time fielded baseball clubs. The Wiedemann Club and Heidelberg club played around the same time and even faced each other on several occasions. The most prominent though was the Wiedemann Baseball Club also known as the ‘Brewers’ They were a Semi-Pro team that played baseball in Newport, Kentucky. According to team letterhead from 1909 the club was organized sometime in 1903.

 

The above letterhead from the August “Garry” Hermann papers obtained from the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Hermann owned the Cincinnati Reds from 1902 to 1927. He also had a stint as the president of the National Baseball Commission. This particular letterhead was part of a note sent to Hermann from Wiedemann manager Arthur Nieman. Notice how the letter head proclaims the club as being leaders in Semi-Professional Baseball.

While researching the club between 1903 and 1907 other than a few game announcements and outcomes not many details […]

Bygone Buildings: Covington’s Changing Cityscape

Have you ever driven past an empty lot and wondered what was there before the asphalt and crabgrass? A surface lot, or even a new building in the heart of Covington, was likely erected upon the spot where another building once stood. Covington’s built environment has many intact and preserved buildings dating back as far as the early 1800s, but you might find a photo of a building in Faces and Places that you don’t recognize that was lost to development, fire, or perceived obsolescence. Here are a few examples of buildings of historic and stylistic distinction that once stood in Covington, but are now gone.

Holmes’ Castle is likely the most well-known example of lost architecture in Covington. This palatial home was the second location of Covington Public High School. The high school was originally located on Russell Street, near 12th Street, and was also torn down. Holmes’ Castle was built by Daniel Henry Holmes, a wealthy retailer. It was designed in the Gothic Revival style, which can be identified by its pointed arch windows and church-like details. With its sprawling grounds and lavishly appointed interior, Holmesdale was not D. H. Holmes’ only residence, and in 1915 (seventeen years after his death), his surviving family sold the property to the Covington School Board. The high school was moved into the residence until 1936, when it was razed and a new building constructed in its place. The décor and furnishings that remained were auctioned, and what didn’t sell was unceremoniously burned in the football field.

The Amos Shinkle Mansion is one particularly polarizing example of Gothic Revival architecture that once stood at 165 E. 2nd Street—people seem to either find it grand and exciting, or stuffy […]

Caring for Seniors During the Holidays

With all the hustle and bustle the holiday seasons brings it can become overwhelming quickly and we can easily forget about those who may need extra attention during the holiday season. The holidays can be tough for senior citizens who may not be able to attend holiday parties (due to physical limitations) or travel to see their family (health conditions prevent them from flying or driving for long periods). Holidays can also bring back fond and emotional memories of loved ones passed. These memories can make the holidays tough to get through. You may find that some of your senior friends, neighbors or those you work with moods have changed. During the holiday season it is not uncommon for senior citizens to experience the holiday blues.

With the holidays approaching I cannot help but think of the Homebound patrons the Kenton County Public Library Outreach department serves. Some of our patrons have no family or their family members live out of town. So, what can we do to help our patrons, senior neighbors, grandparents and our senior friends through the holidays? Listed below and some tips on how to cheer up senior citizens during the holiday season.

Sit and chat with them for a while. You might be the only human contact they have throughout the holiday season. Allow them to reminisce about holidays past.
Holiday cards: Send a holiday card to your neighbor, friend or relative who may be alone for the holiday season. Let them know you are thinking about them and you wish the very best holiday season. I can tell you from experience this can really make their day and they will talk about it for months afterwards.
Invite them over for a holiday […]

By |October 14th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post, KCPL, Outreach||0 Comments

Celebrate Your Heritage During Family History Month – October 2014

October is Family History Month, and what better time to celebrate your family’s heritage!

Tracing the heritage of your family can produce so many insights into the struggles and the accomplishments of one’s ancestors – the story of why your family came to live in a certain place, how family members learned a trade, what religious, fraternal or civic organizations your ancestors belonged to, what sort of awards and recognitions your ancestors received, who might be your distant cousins. With the ever-increasing amount of information available in print and online, researching the lives of your predecessors has never been easier – and more complicated at the same time! So, where to begin?

The best way to begin a family history project is to start in the present and work backwards in time – from the known to the unknown. Gather up any family documents, talk to older relatives, and peruse family photographs. Look for birth, marriage, and death information on your family members, as these are the “building blocks” of a family tree. As you work your way backwards in time, also take note of family friends, neighbors and associates. Knowing about them can sometimes provide clues to your own family’s stories.

But what do you do when you finally hit that “brick wall” in your research? What steps can you take to discover more about your ancestors’ lives? To help you with your research and in honor of Family History Month, the Local History and Genealogy department is offering a variety of programs in October to enhance your family heritage sleuthing.

The month begins with a program titled, “Did He Say Regiment, Squadron, Battalion, Destroyer or Attack Transport?” presented by Bill Stolz on Thursday, October 2nd at […]

Celebrating Women of Character, Courage and Commitment

A Wynk, a Blynk, and a Nod to Women’s History Month
Before 1970, women’s history was rarely the subject of serious consideration. However, two significant factors contributed to its emergence as a topic worthy of study. The women’s movement of the sixties caused women to examine their exclusion from traditional American history textbooks. Second, the study of history in general was being transformed, and women’s history was a part of this movement that ultimately transformed the study of history in the United States. History had traditionally meant political history – a study of the key political events and of the leaders, primarily men, who influenced them. However, by the 1970’s, social history began replacing the older style.

Women’s History Month in the United States began as a small-town school event, “Women’s History Week,” in Sonoma County, California in 1978. The week that was selected included March 8, International Women’s Day. In 1981, Senator Orrin Hatch of Utah and Representative Barbara Mikulski of Maryland co-sponsored a joint Congressional resolution proclaiming a national Women’s History Week. In 1987, after much lobbying by the National Women’s History Project (NWHP), Congress expanded the celebration to a full month, and March was declared Women’s History Month. Between 1988 and 1994, Congress passed additional resolutions requesting and authorizing the President to proclaim March of each year as Women’s History Month. Since 1995, U. S. Presidents have issued annual proclamations designating March as Women’s History Month.
The NWHP, founded in 1980, remains a national clearinghouse for multicultural women’s history information. Each year this organization selects a theme that highlights achievements by distinguished women in specific fields, from medicine and the environment to art and politics. The theme for 2014 is “Celebrating Women of Character, […]

Cincinnati Ballet’s Alice (in Wonderland) Giveaway

 
It’s always tea time in wonderland. Everyone is invited to tea with Alice in wonderland! When guests reach the bottom of the rabbit hole, they should promptly follow the White Rabbit (he’s got a very important date). He will escort them to the tea party, where they will be greeted by various guests. Don’t feel obliged to answer the Mad Hatter when he asks why a raven is like a writing desk (unless you know the answer). Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dum are sure to fly by and the Cheshire Cat is slated to make an appearance, but you never know when he’ll disappear. Guests do not want to offend the Red Queen or they might end up losing their heads!
PERFORMANCE DATES AND TIMES

Friday, February 13 – 8:00 pm
Sunday, February 15 – 1:00 pm

Saturday, February 14 – 2:00 pm
Sunday, February 15 – 5:30 pm

Saturday, February 14 – 8:00 pm

Tickets can be purchased by visiting the Cincinnati Ballet’s website. Tickets range from $32-$100. The Cincinnati Ballet has partnered with the Kenton County Public Library to offer 20% off to Library patrons. Just use the code G1415KenLib to receive the discount.
Giveaway: The Cincinnati Ballet has provided the Library with a voucher for two tickets (date and time of your choice) to Alice (in wonderland) to giveaway to one lucky reader. You have three chances to win. Be sure to do each entry separately for more chances to win. The deadline to enter is Jan. 14 at noon. The winner will be announced on the Library Facebook page and have 24 hours to respond. How to enter:
1. Comment on the blog saying who you would tag with you and why.
2. Tweet this post including @kentonlibrary and comment here that you did.
3. Share on Facebook tagging […]

Cincinnati Ballet’s Peter Pan Flash Ticket Giveaway

For those who never want to grow up, there’s Never Never Land. Luckily, for the Darling family children, Wendy, John and Michael, there’s Peter Pan to guide them through this magical place full of pirates and Indians and Lost Boys. The foursome (with the help of the mischievous Tinkerbell) fly to Never Never Land where the cranky pirate Captain Hook, a hungry crocodile and more adventures await. Follow along on this swashbuckling journey, past the second star to the right and straight on ’til morning, as these classic characters learn what growing up is really all about. The Kenton County Public Library would like to help one lucky winner experience Never Never Land. See the giveaway details below.

 
Tickets can be bought at the box office or by visiting the Cincinnati Ballet Website.
 

Friday, November 7 – 8:00 pm

Saturday, November 8 – 2:00 pm

Saturday, November 8 – 8:00 pm

Sunday, November 9 – 2:00 pm

 
Giveaway
The library has a voucher for two tickets to the performance time of your choice. Library employees and those living in their household cannot enter to win. A winner will be chosen randomly by the end of the day on Wednesday, Nov. 5. The winner will be announced on the Kenton County Public Library’s Facebook page and will have 24 hours to respond to claim the voucher. The voucher must be picked up at one of the Kenton County Public Library locations.

How to enter:

Comment on this post stating why you want to win.
Share this post on Facebook or Twitter and comment here stating that you did. (Entries will be verified)

 
Good luck!

By |November 4th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post||80 Comments

Classic Book Discussion

Classic Books Discussion Series at Covington

The Classic Book Discussion Series is a new program at the Covington Branch designed to provide readers with the opportunity to discuss books that have proved to be of enduring interest.  This season’s discussions began in September with Sinclair Lewis’ “Main Street” and will continue with one discussion each month, concluding in May with a modern retelling of the ancient story of “The Ramayana” by South Asian author R. K. Narayan. Diversity was an important selection criterion for the books we selected.

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By |January 15th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post|Tags: |0 Comments

Classic Book Discussion Series – Covington Branch

Love the classics?  Join us to discuss “A Christmas Carol”
December 11, at 7 p.m.
Each month the Covington Location of the Kenton County Public Library discusses a classic book.

Copies of this book that is credited with reviving Christmas as a holiday of merriment and festivity may be picked up at
Covington Reference Desk or Drive Thru Window up to 6 weeks before the discussion.

Anyone requiring special accommodations is asked to contact the Library one week in advance of program, (859) 962-4070.
 
 

 

By |November 14th, 2013|Categories: Featured Post||0 Comments

Classic Book Discussion Series – No Exit

Love the classics?  Join us to discuss “No Exit”
Wednesday, January 15, 2014, 7 – 8pm
Each month the Covington Location of the Kenton County Public Library discusses a classic book.

Join us for a discussion of Jean-Paul Sartre’s play” No Exit”, voted the Best Foreign Play in New York in 1946.  The play is considered by many to be Sartre’s best play and most accessible dramatization of his philosophy of existentialism.  Three damned souls, Garcin, Inès, and Estelle are brought to the same room in hell by a mysterious Valet. They had all expected medieval torture devices to punish them for eternity, but instead find a plain furnished room.

Copies of the book may be picked up at the Covington Reference Desk up to six week before the discussion.

Anyone requiring special accommodations is asked to contact the Library one week in advance of program, (859) 962-4070.
 
 

 

By |December 18th, 2013|Categories: Featured Post||0 Comments

Classic Book Discussion Series – The Souls of Black Folk

Kenton County Public Library
Covington Branch
Classic Book Discussion Series
April Title:
W. E. B. Du Bois’s The Souls of Black Folk
Wednesday, April 16, 7p.m.
Copies of  this work in which Du Bois drew on his own experience to create a classic in sociology may be picked up at  the Covington Reference Desk or Drive Thru Window up to 6 weeks before the discussion. Call 859-962-4060 ext. 4241 for more information.

 

 

By |March 24th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post||0 Comments

Cooking for Two

While many of the library patrons served by the Outreach department are residents in facilities that provide them with daily meals, not all of them are. Several are retired couples, or individuals who live in their own homes and apartments. They are responsible for their own food choices and preparation and in that respect; they fall into a category of household that is becoming more and more standard these days.
No longer is the large family the norm.  There are many singles and couples, and they all want to feed themselves well.  Statistics back this up, with at present one-third of American families containing only two people. 
-from Not Your Mother’s Slow Cooker Recipes for Two
Whether you’re a retired individual, a young adult moving into your first apartment, a bachelor or bachelorette, a pair of newlyweds, or an empty-nester, you will be faced with the new territory of either cooking for yourself for the first time, or cooking smaller sized meals than you have in the past. During these challenges, it’s dangerously easy to fall into the takeout/pizza delivery trap. Learning how to adjust your skills and cook at home is better in the long run for both your health and your wallet. Plus, you’ll avoid the dreaded, “what do you want?”, “I don’t know, what sounds good to you?” exchange that can go on endlessly and frustrate even the most generally unflappable individuals.

According to research, most people who cook for themselves use and rotate, at most, only a dozen or so recipes…thus everyday meals can become so routine that any mealtime excitement is lost.
-from Not Your Mother’s Slow Cooker Recipes for Two
I can say from personal experience that the statement above is true. While living alone, and even now […]

By |July 31st, 2014|Categories: Featured Post, KCPL, Outreach||0 Comments

Cooking With Kids

Dinner.

The word strikes fear into my heart.  I have to cook it almost every day.  In the most stressful times I will find myself stuck in a cooking rut faced with whiney children.  What’s a parent to do?

Cook with the kids.

It’s a bit counterintuitive because it definitely takes more time than cooking solo. However, when my children are invested in the meal through planning and effort we reap several benefits:

Cooking becomes family time instead of a chore for Mom or Dad.
 The children are excited to eat the dinner they helped prepare
 We tend to eat healthier meals.

Ready to try it out?

Plan: Let your children (if they are old enough) help choose the meal to cook. You can browse cookbooks or websites together or just ask them for their ideas.  In our home, I prompt them to include seasonal fruits and veggies, or let them know ingredients we have on hand. Even letting them choose from a list pre-approved by me makes them feel more invested in the meal.

Prep:  The last thing you want to do when you are cooking with children is fumble around for equipment and ingredients.  An advantage of planning is that it gives me a grocery list.  We go through our recipe together and get out what we need. Even my 8 year old still needs a footstool, and everybody gets an apron.

Read the recipe as you go: When you model reading directions it helps your child’s reading development.  Directional reading requires different reading skills than reading a story.  If your children are reading independently, let them read the recipe to you.

Be safe:  Excited children can forget that stoves are hot and knives are sharp so keep a sharp eye out. For […]

Cooking with the Library Month – Kentucky Inspired Cooking

July is Cooking Month at the Kenton County Public Library and today’s blog focuses on what’s available from the Local History and Genealogy Department in Covington.

Do you know how to make jellied chicken? How about hominy puffs? Have you ever had Bouilli soup? You can find recipes for these and other unusual and delicious regional dishes in our cookbook collection located in the local history and genealogy department.

Many of our books can serve as historical sketches of the region. It’s interesting to see some of the older recipes like one for Kentucky burgout from The Blue Grass Cook Book that calls for “6 squirrels and 6 birds” or what was included in the book’s recipe for a “very fine omelet.” But, while many of our cookbooks are a glimpse into kitchens of the past, there’s no reason you shouldn’t try to make some of these delicious concoctions in your own home.

If you’re looking for a challenge, you might want to try a recipe from The Kentucky Housewife by Lettice Bryan. This compilation uses a paragraph format for each dish instead of the list presentation that is commonly used in today’s cookbooks. It also calls for measurements and techniques that are atypical in today’s modern kitchen, but don’t let that scare you. In fact, we highly recommend the “plain potato soup” on page 24.

Why not give one of the books below a try (or another from our four shelves of cookbooks in the local history department)?

The Blue Grass Cook Book – K 641.5975 F793b
The Kentucky Housewife – K 641.59 B915k
Appalachian Home Cooking – K 641.5975 S682a
The Blue Ribbon Cook Book – K 641.5973 B463b
The Historic Kentucky Kitchen – K 641.5975 S278h
The Delta Queen Cookbook – K 641.5975 N753d
The Kentucky Bourbon Cookbook – K 641.625 S348k

You can also check out our […]

Covington Library Stats & Stories – One Year Later

Covington Library Stats & Stories – Snapshots of the revitalization of Covington Library One Year Later

The Covington Library is one of those unique places. Smack in the center of an urban renewal. It’s one of the few places in Northern Kentucky where you can see people struggling to survive sitting next to a Federal judge. All are welcomed, none are judged. This month marks one year since the Covington Library has been fully operational after a 24 month expansion and renovation. A few questioned the need for expansion; citing books were a thing of the past. That couldn’t be further from the case. Since 2013, the Covington Library has seen a tremendous amount of use and has radically impacted the community and the people it serves.

The following is a brief snapshot on how the Covington Library remains relevant not only by providing books, materials and services, but also by being a critical part of the Northern Kentucky Community.

Stats and stories

The Kenton County Public Library records statistics on the fiscal year, beginning July 1 and ending June 30 of the following calendar year. Here is a look at the statistics for the Covington Library for July 1, 2013 through June 30, 2014:

Circulation of items for adults: 413,076 (up 31%)
Circulation of items for children: 92,461 (up 25%)
Overall circulation of items including books, movies, music , magazines and more: 505,537 (up 29%)
1,618 programs for adults, teens and children were offered including computer classes, book discussions, job skills education, storytimes, literacy enrichment and more. 37,595 people attended these programs.
Volunteers contributed 2,516 hours to the Covington Library, a value of $45,061.56
Staff answered 136,104 reference questions.
From July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2014, 407,516 people visited the Covington Library.

Stories and […]

December 24 & 25

All locations of the Library will be closed December 24 & 25.  However you can still access great books, video and audiobooks on our site.

 

 

 

Have you used Hoopla?  We have some great suggestions over on our 25 Days of e-Christmas blog.  Hoopla content is always available!  No waiting and no fines!

 

 

 

 

 

Looking for a great read?  Many of your favorite authors and hot new titles are over at our ebook site Overdrive.   Can’t decide what to read?  Check out the titles on our Hot Reads blog or A Wynk, A Blynk and a Nod to Books for children’s books.

 

 

 

DIY Prom

DIY PROM

It’s prom time, so let’s talk about hair and makeup!

If there’s one thing I (Jessy the Librarian) love as much as stories, it’s probably lipstick. Or maybe eyeliner. One of the best place I’ve found for (non-video) makeup/hair tutorials is The Beauty Department. I love the idea of a metallic eye, especially if your dress is more of a matte texture, like tulle.

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By |April 16th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post|Tags: , , , |Comments Off

Everything Old is New Again

A Wynk, a Blynk and a Nod to Books Suitable for Holiday Gift-Giving

The holidays are right around the corner, and chances are you’re looking for great gift ideas. You’ve come to the right place. There’s nothing like a classic book, and this year there’s a bumper crop of beautiful new anniversary editions sure to make adults nostalgic and kids engaged.
Reissued Classics and Anniversary Editions
The Best Christmas Pageant Ever by Barbara Robinson

Robinson’s classic story of the Herdman children first appeared in 1971. A picture book version is also available.

 

 

The Book of Three by Lloyd Alexander

Originally published in 1964, The Book of Three is the first book in the Newbery Award winning fantasy series.

 

 

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl, illus. by Quentin Blake

Can Charlie Bucket really be fifty years old? Yes he is, and everyone can celebrate by reading this 50th anniversary edition printed on candy colored pages.

 

 

The Christmas Alphabet: Deluxe 20th Anniversary Edition by Robert Sabuda

This book launched Sabuda’s career in 1994. The anniversary edition of this famous pop-up classic is a joy to open.

 

 

Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed by Eileen Christelow

Included in this 25th anniversary edition is a free audio download, a “How to Draw a Monkey” activity, and music and lyrics for the much-loved song.

 

 

Guess How Much I Love You by Sam McBratney, illus. by Anita Jeram

First published in the United Kingdom in 1994, this cherished tale now celebrates twenty years.

 

 

Harriet the Spy by Louise Fitzhugh

This 50th anniversary edition features a map of Harriet’s spy route and a section in which grown-ups, including many writers, share their feelings about the book.

 

 

James Herriot’s Treasury for Children by James Herriot, illus. by Ruth Brown and Peter Barrett

Originally published in […]

Friends of the Library Book Sale

Stock up on your reading material at the Friends of Kenton County Public Library Used Book Sale. 
The sale will take place May 11 to May 17.  

Hours of the sale are:

-Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.

-Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Nearly-new and used books, music and movies will be sold with prices ranging from 25 cents to  $4.  Proceeds from the sale will go towards programs and services that support the Library. The Durr Branch is located at 1992 Walton-Nicholson Independence, KY 41051

 

 

By |January 16th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

Get Started With Homeschooling at the Library

Being a homeschooler can be tough; not only do you have all of the usual household responsibilities to tend to, but you’re also your child’s teacher and mentor. Finding the time to plan a lesson and gather all of the materials can be difficult, but the library is a valuable resource and we’d love to help you out!

Homeschool teachers can apply for a special library card as an educator, just as a traditional teacher could. They’re a little different than normal cards, so here are the basics:

*You can check out 100 items

*You can request up to 30 items on the same subject

*We’ll renew your items, without you even having to ask, up to five times

*All items that were returned overdue receive a one week grace period where overdue fines are not charged

Sounds great, right? That’s not even the tip of the iceberg! We can also put together a teacher collection for you and save you time. Just let us know what you’re teaching, grade/reading level of your students and when you need it and we’ll have it ready for you to pick up.

You can also request book kits containing 15 copies of the same elementary-level book so that your children or co-op can all read the same book as part of a lesson. We have lots of titles that will keep your kids reading all year long!

We’re not stopping there! We’ve put together curriculum packs, essentially a lesson plan in a bag! They’re bags of materials (books, music, manipulatives, games) geared for elementary-age children on different subjects like fractions, anatomy, poetry and world cultures, just to name a few. You can request these and use them in your classroom as a supplement or as a lesson in itself.

If you’re […]

By |October 6th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post|Tags: , |0 Comments

Haunt Your Library Writing Contest 2014

Writing Contest for Grades 1-6
Enter an original poem or tale in the Library’s 12th annual Spooky Writing Contest (700 word limit).Winning stories will be featured in the Community Press! Submit entries to the Covington Children’s Department or email a Word document to writingcontest@kentonlibrary.org.
Winners will be announced and awarded prizes on October 17. Winning stories will be featured in the Community Press paper. Entries must be received by October 10.
Entries must include child’s name, age, address, phone, email address,school, grade and a color photo of the child.

By |September 9th, 2014|Categories: childrens, Featured Post||0 Comments

Healthy Cooking With the Library

Hi. I’m Erin. I write at A Bird and A Bean and I love summer. Hot, lazy days with the kids. Gardening. Cookouts. Swimming. Vacations with the family. Time “off.” But, moms don’t really get a vacation….even on vacation. I actually don’t mind. Vacations look different when you have little kids. Still awesome and fun, but just not as relaxing. The Onion sums that whole thing up pretty well in this hilarious article that I like to share, “Mom Spends Beach Vacation Assuming All Household Duties In Closer Proximity To Ocean.”Cracks me up.
One thing I do try to do less of in the summer whether we are on a vacation or a stay-cation… is turn the oven on. It just heats the whole house right up. No thank you. But, I like to still get the veggies in and keep things on the healthy side. We love utilizing the grill and crock-pot in the summer. But, things can get boring. Grilling the same burgers and hotdogs. Making the same old chili in the crock-pot.
I decided to keep things interesting by checking out the library’s cookbook and food magazine selection. There are so many choices. You know all those magazines you see in the line at the grocery store and want to buy?? They are all at the library!

Look at this fantastic cookbook selection! And this is just a small portion of what they have. You can easily find some new fresh and healthy recipes for your family this summer. It was hard to narrow it down. I was drawn to so many.. crockpot books, grilling cookbooks and a popsicle recipe books. I loved the zucchini and tomato recipe book idea, too. I could’ve used […]

Hot New Reads – April

Sisters of Heart and Snow by Margaret Diloway

The award-winning author of How to Be and American Housewife returns with a poignant story of estranged sisters, forced together by family tragedy, who soon learn that sisterhood knows no limits. Rachel and Drew Snow may be sisters, but their lives have followed completely different paths. Married to a wonderful man and is a mother to two strong-minded teens, Rachel hasn’t returned to her childhood home since being kicked out by her strict father after an act of careless teenage rebellion. Drew, her younger sister, followed her passion for music but takes side jobs to make ends meet and longs for the stability that has always eluded her. Both sisters recall how close they were, but the distance between them seems more than they can bridge. When their deferential Japanese mother, Haruki, is diagnosed with dementia and gives Rachel power of attorney, Rachel’s domineering father, Killian becomes enraged. In a rare moment of lucidity, Haruki asks Rachel for a book in her sewing room, and Rachel enlists her sister’s help in the search. The book-which tells the tale of real-life female samurai Tomoe Gozen, an epic saga of love, loss, and conflict during twelfth-century Japan-reveals truths about Drew and Rachel’s relationship that resonate across the centuries, connecting them in ways that turn their differences into assets.

 

Where They Found Her by Kimberly McCreight

From the author of the New York Times bestseller and 2014 Edgar and Anthony nominee Reconstructing Amelia comes another harrowing, gripping novel that marries psychological suspense with an emotionally powerful story about a community struggling with the consequences of a devastating discovery. At the end of a long winter in well-to-do Ridgedale, New Jersey, the body […]

Hot New Reads – August

Small Blessings by Martha Woodroof

Tom Putnam, an English professor at a Virginia women’s college, has resigned himself to a quiet and half-fulfilled life. For more than ten years, his wife Marjory has been a shut-in, a fragile and frigid woman whose neuroses have left her fully dependent on Tom and his formidable mother-in-law, Agnes Tattle. Tom considers his unhappy condition self-inflicted, since Marjory’s condition was exacerbated by her discovery of Tom’s brief and misguided affair with a visiting poetess. But when Tom and Marjory meet Rose Callahan, the campus bookstore’s charming new hire, and Marjory invites Rose to dinner, her first social interaction in a decade, Tom wonders if it’s a sign that change is on the horizon. And when Tom returns home that evening to a letter from the poetess telling him that he’d fathered her son, Henry, and that Henry, now ten, will arrive by train in a few days, it’s clear change is coming whether Tom’s ready or not.

 

 

 

 

 

The Supernatural Enhancements by Edgar Cantero

Inheriting an eerie estate in the Virginia woods, a skeptical man wonders about his family member’s suicide and realizes that the house harbors both ghosts and terrible secrets, in a story told through journal entries, scrawled notes, security footage, audio recordings and advertisements.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Frozen Dead by Bernard Minier

In a snowbound valley, deep in the French Pyrenees, a dark story of madness and revenge is unfolding. The first victim is a horse: its headless, flayed body hangs suspended from the edge of a frozen cliff. On the same day as the gruesome discovery takes place, Diane Berg, a young psychiatrist starts her first job at a high security asylum for the criminally insane, just a few miles away. She is […]

Hot New Reads – December

The Boston Girl by Anita Diamant

Addie Baum is The Boston Girl, born in 1900 to immigrant parents who were unprepared for and suspicious of America and its effect on their three daughters. Growing up in the North End, then a teeming multicultural neighborhood, Addie’s intelligence and curiosity take her to a world her parents can’t imagine—a world of short skirts, movies, celebrity culture, and new opportunities for women. Addie wants to finish high school and dreams of going to college. She wants a career and to find true love.

Eighty-five-year-old Addie tells the story of her life to her twenty-two-year-old granddaughter, who has asked her “How did you get to be the woman you are today.” She begins in 1915, the year she found her voice and made friends who would help shape the course of her life. From the one-room tenement apartment she shared with her parents and two sisters, to the library group for girls she joins at a neighborhood settlement house, to her first, disastrous love affair, Addie recalls her adventures with compassion for the naïve girl she was and a wicked sense of humor.

Written with the same attention to historical detail and emotional resonance that made Anita Diamant’s previous novels bestsellers, The Boston Girl is a moving portrait of one woman’s complicated life in twentieth century America, and a fascinating look at a generation of women finding their places in a changing world.

 

 

Vanessa and Her Sister by Priya Parmar

For readers of The Paris Wife and Loving Frank, here is the first novel to offer a fascinating glimpse into the adult lives of sisters Virginia Woolf and Vanessa Bell, set against the backdrop of a new era—early 1900s London—and focusing on the perennially controversial and popular circle of […]

By |December 10th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post, Hot New Reads|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Hot New Reads – February

Before He Finds Her by Michael Kardos

Everyone in the quiet Jersey Shore town of Silver Bay knows the story: on a Sunday evening in September 1991, Ramsey Miller threw a blowout block party, then murdered his beautiful wife and three-year-old daughter.

But everyone is wrong. The daughter got away. Now she is nearly eighteen and tired of living in secrecy. Under the name Melanie Denison, she has spent the last fifteen years in small-town West Virginia as part of the Witness Protection Program. She has never been allowed to travel, go to a school dance, or even have internet at home. Precautions must be taken at every turn, because Ramsey Miller was never caught and might still be looking for his daughter. Yet despite strict house rules, Melanie has entered into a relationship with a young teacher at the local high school and is now ten weeks pregnant. She doesn’t want her child to live in hiding as she has had to. Defying her guardians and taking matters into her own hands, Melanie returns to Silver Bay in hopes of doing what the authorities have failed to do: find her father before he finds her. Weaving in Ramsey’s story in the three days leading up to the brutal crime, Before He Finds Her is a stirring novel about love and faith and fear-and how the most important things can become terribly distorted when we cling to them too fiercely.

 

A Touch of Stardust by Kate Alcott
digital audiobook

When Julie Crawford leaves Fort Wayne, Indiana for Hollywood, she never imagines she’ll cross paths with Carole Lombard, the dazzling actress from Julie’s provincial Midwestern hometown. Although the young woman has dreams of becoming a screenwriter, the only job Julie’s able to […]

By |January 30th, 2015|Categories: Featured Post, Hot New Reads|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Hot New Reads – January

The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins
A debut psychological thriller that will forever change the way you look at other people’s lives.

Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning. Every day she rattles down the track, flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. She’s even started to feel like she knows them. “Jess and Jason,” she calls them. Their life—as she sees it—is perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost.

And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough. Now everything’s changed. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel offers what she knows to the police, and becomes inextricably entwined in what happens next, as well as in the lives of everyone involved. Has she done more harm than good?

Compulsively readable, The Girl on the Train is an emotionally immersive, Hitchcockian thriller and an electrifying debut.

 
Etta and Otto and Russell and James by Emma Hooper
Eighty-two-year-old Etta has never seen the ocean. So early one morning she takes a rifle, some chocolate, and her best boots, and begins walking the 3,232 kilometers from rural Canada eastward to the coast.

Her husband Otto wakes to a note left on the kitchen table. I will try to remember to come back, Etta writes to him. Otto has seen the ocean, having crossed the Atlantic years ago to fight in a far-away war. He understands. But with Etta gone, the memories come crowding in and Otto struggles to keep them at bay.

Russell has spent his whole life trying to keep up with Otto and loving Etta from afar. Russell insists on finding Etta, […]

By |December 22nd, 2014|Categories: Featured Post, Hot New Reads|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Hot New Reads – July

The Black Hour by Lori Rader-Day

For sociology professor Amelia Emmet, violence was a research topic—until a student she’d never met shot her. He also shot himself. Now he’s dead and she’s stuck with a cane and one question she can’t let go: Why her? All she wants is for life to get back to normal. Better than normal, actually, since life was messy before she was shot. Then graduate student Nathaniel Barber offers to help her track down some answers. He’s got a crush and his own agenda—plans to make her his killer dissertation topic. Together and at cross-purposes, Amelia and Nathaniel stumble toward a truth that will explain the attack and take them both through the darkest hours of their lives.
ebook

 

Last Night at the Blue Angel by Rebecca Rotert

Set against the backdrop of the early 1960s Chicago jazz scene, a highly ambitious and stylish literary debut that combines the atmosphere and period detail of Amor Towles’ Rules of Civility with the emotional depth and drama of The Memory Keeper’s Daughter, about a talented but troubled singer, her precocious ten-year-old daughter, and their heatbreaking relationship.
ebook

 

 

 

Landline by Rainbow Rowell

Georgie McCool knows her marriage is in trouble. That it’s been in trouble for a long time. She still loves her husband, Neal, and Neal still loves her, deeply—but that almost seems beside the point now. Maybe that was always beside the point.

Two days before they’re supposed to visit Neal’s family in Omaha for Christmas, Georgie tells Neal that she can’t go. She’s a TV writer, and something’s come up on her show; she has to stay in Los Angeles. She knows that Neal will be upset with her—Neal is always a little upset with Georgie—but she doesn’t expect to him to pack up […]

Hot New Reads – November

Color Blind by Colby Marshall

There is something unusual about Dr. Jenna Ramey’s brain, a rare perceptual quirk that punctuates her experiences with flashes of color. They are hard to explain: red can mean anger, or love, or strength. But she can use these spontaneous mental associations, understand and interpret them enough to help her read people and situations in ways others cannot. As an FBI forensic psychiatrist, she used it to profile and catch criminals. Years ago, she used it to save her own family from her charming, sociopathic mother.

Now, the FBI has detained a mass murderer and called for Jenna’s help. Upon interrogation she learns that, behind bars or not, he holds the power to harm more innocents—and is obsessed with gaining power over Jenna herself. He has a partner still on the loose. And Jenna’s unique mind, with its strange and subtle perceptions, may be all that can prevent a terrifying reality…

 

Citizen Coke: The Making of Coca-Cola Capitalism by Bartow J. Elmore

How did Coca-Cola build a global empire by selling a low-price concoction of mostly sugar, water, and caffeine? The easy answer is advertising, but the real formula to Coke s success was its strategy, from the start, to offload costs and risks onto suppliers, franchisees, and the government. For most of its history the company owned no bottling plants, water sources, cane- or cornfields. A lean operation, it benefited from public goods like cheap municipal water and curbside recycling programs. Its huge appetite for ingredients gave it outsized influence on suppliers and congressional committees. This was Coca-Cola capitalism.

In this new history Bartow J. Elmore explores Coke through its ingredients, showing how the company secured massive quantities of coca leaf, caffeine, sugar, […]

By |November 6th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post, Hot New Reads|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Hot New Reads – October

Ruth’s Journey: The Story of Mammy from Gone with the Wind by Donald McCaig

Authorized by the Margaret Mitchell Estate, here is the first-ever prequel to one of the most beloved and bestselling novels of all time, Gone with the Wind. The critically acclaimed author of Rhett Butler’s Peoplemagnificently recounts the life of Mammy, one of literature’s greatest supporting characters, from her days as a slave girl to the outbreak of the Civil War.

 

 

 

 

 

The Book of Strange New Things by Michel  Faber

The Book of Strange New Things tells the story of Peter Leigh, a devoted man of faith called to the mission of a lifetime, one that takes him literally light years away from his wife, Bea. Peter becomes immersed in the mysteries of an astonishing new environment and the ego-gratifying work of ministering to a native population hungry for the Bible-this “book of strange new things.” But he soon begins to receive increasingly desperate letters from home. North Korea is devastated by a typhoon; the Maldives are wiped out by a tsunami; England endures an earthquake, and Bea’s faith, once the guiding light of their lives, begins to falter.

A separation measured in galaxies, and defined both by one newly discovered world and another in a state of collapse, is threatened by an ever-widening gulf that is much less quantifiable. Peter’s and Bea’s trials lay bare a profound meditation on faith, love tested beyond endurance, and the responsibility we have to others.

 

Us by David Nicholls

The highly anticipated new novel from David Nicholls, author of the mega-bestselling fiction sensation One Day, which follows one man’s efforts to salvage his marriage–and repair his troubled relationship with his teenaged son–during the course of a trip around Europe.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Madness of July by […]

By |October 7th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post, Hot New Reads|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Hot New Reads – September

A Sudden Light by Garth Stein

In the summer of 1990, fourteen-year-old Trevor Riddell gets his first glimpse of Riddell House. Built from the spoils of a massive timber fortune, the legendary family mansion is constructed of giant, whole trees, and is set on a huge estate overlooking Puget Sound. Trevor’s bankrupt parents have begun a trial separation, and his father, Jones Riddell, has brought Trevor to Riddell House with a goal: to join forces with his sister, Serena, dispatch Grandpa Samuel—who is flickering in and out of dementia—to a graduated living facility, sell off the house and property for development into “tract housing for millionaires,” divide up the profits, and live happily ever after.

But Trevor soon discovers there’s someone else living in Riddell House: a ghost with an agenda of his own. For while the land holds tremendous value, it is also burdened by the final wishes of the family patriarch, Elijah, who mandated it be allowed to return to untamed forestland as a penance for the millions of trees harvested over the decades by the Riddell Timber company. The ghost will not rest until Elijah’s wish is fulfilled, and Trevor’s willingness to face the past holds the key to his family’s future.

 

Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel

One snowy night a famous Hollywood actor slumps over and dies onstage during a production of King Lear. Hours later, the world as we know it begins to dissolve. Moving back and forth in time-from the actor’s early days as a film star to fifteen years in the future, when a theater troupe known as the Traveling Symphony roams the wasteland of what remains-this suspenseful, elegiac, spellbinding novel charts the strange twists of fate that connect five […]

By |August 28th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post, Hot New Reads|Tags: , , |0 Comments

How We Choose Your Books

Happy National Library Week 2015!  One of the most important jobs at the Library is selecting, processing and buying items.  Ever wonder how we do it?  Read on to peek behind the curtain and see how it all happens…

More than 2,000,000 books and other items were checked out from the Kenton County Public Library last year, making our library one of the highest circulating libraries in the state.  But you may be wondering how we choose the materials that end up on our shelves.  Our strategic plan outlines five service priorities; the first two of these are Create Lifelong Readers and Learners, and Stimulate Imagination.  The Collection Development department strives to ensure that these service priorities are reflected in the materials we select.

We have four staff who are responsible for selecting tens of thousands of items each year—two for adult and young adult materials, one for children’s, and one A/V specialist.  Each of us spends time reading through reviews in both professional journals and popular newspapers and magazines, looking at bestseller lists, and paying attention to online trends to discover what our patrons might be interested in reading.  We read reviews from professional publications such as Booklist, Publishers Weekly, and Library Journal, and from popular magazines like People and Entertainment Weekly.

For items we know are going to be popular, we are able to set up standing orders with our vendors.  This means when a popular author like James Patterson or John Grisham has a new book coming out, they will automatically ship us a designated number of copies.  We have a similar plan for nonfiction, where, for one example, we can get the latest editions of popular travel guides sent without having to order […]

By |April 14th, 2015|Categories: Featured Post, KCPL||0 Comments

Isn’t it Pinteresting?

The Kenton County Public Library offers a gargantuan amount of programs, materials and services for all ages. To add to these services, the library has started a Pinterest videos series to guide you through great crafts for your family.

Marker Robots!

 

Try past episodes:

Erlanger Adult Programmer Laura Loechle demonstrates how to make Celtic Knot Jewelry.

Covington Children’s Librarian Amy Schardein demonstrates a fun Pinterest craft – how to color pasta noodles for crafts.

Follow the Pinteresting board on Pinterest

Find other Kenton County Public Library boards

Questions?  Just ask!

Libraries Change Lives

Add your name to the Friends of Kentucky Libraries “Declaration for the Right to Libraries”

Sign the Declaration for the Right to Libraries Today
In the spirit of the United States Declaration of Independence and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, we believe that libraries are essential to a democratic society. Every day, in countless communities across our nation and the world, millions of children, students and adults use libraries to learn, grow and achieve their dreams.

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIBRARIES EMPOWER THE INDIVIDUAL
LIBRARIES SUPPORT LITERACY AND LIFELONG LEARNING
LIBRARIES STRENGTHEN FAMILIES
LIBRARIES ARE THE GREAT EQUALIZER
LIBRARIES BUILD COMMUNITIES
LIBRARIES PROTECT OUR RIGHT TO KNOW
LIBRARIES STRENGTHEN OUR NATION
LIBRARIES ADVANCE RESEARCH AND SCHOLARSHIP
LIBRARIES HELP US TO BETTER UNDERSTAND EACH OTHER
LIBRARIES PRESERVE OUR NATION’S CULTURAL HERITAGE  

By |October 21st, 2014|Categories: Featured Post||0 Comments

Library in the News

Kids get a taste of World War I technology
Kamellia Soenjoto Smith, Community Recorder Contributor

ERLANGER – “There’s nothing cool about World War I,” instructor Ethan Palmer began. “It was horrifying and should never be repeated.”

It was a conflict that introduced the world to machine guns, chemical weapons and the inhuman life of trench warfare.

But it also brought about great advances in aviation.

On Aug. 21 about 20 kids from grades 6 to 12 participated in a program called STEAM Explorers at the Erlanger branch of the Kenton County Public Library. They came to learn about the history of World War I and to understand the secrets of flying.

Read the complete article at Cincinnati.com
Sign up for an upcoming STEAM Explorers program

By |September 8th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post, Library in the News||0 Comments

Make Your Own Valentine Gifts

There are hundreds of Valentine’s Day cards that you can buy in the store but we all know that it means more to receive a gift that someone made themselves. So, why not sit down with your child and make cards or gifts to give to classmates and loved ones? We have put together a Pinterest board filled with ideas for different crafts to make with your child. One of my favorites is the Tootsie Pop superhero Valentine, shown here. It comes with a printable template that you can use to make masks and capes for the pops.

It is important that you find an idea that your child is excited about so that they enjoy making the gifts. Remember to consider their age and make sure they will be able to help make the gifts. Our Pinterest board has ideas for using candy, goldfish crackers, glow sticks and more! After deciding what you are going to make, prepare the supplies you will need. Make sure you set aside time to do this ahead of time because the pressure of making cards the night before Valentine’s Day will not be fun for you or your child!

Once you have the supplies you need, sit down with your child or children and allow them to do as much as they are able to do so that it feels personal to them and they feel a part of the process. They don’t need to look perfect to be the perfect Valentine gift.

Grandparents also love child-made gifts. Why not give them a special memento of their place in your child’s heart. Here’s a sweet idea from our pinterest board:

When it is time to pass these gifts out, your child will […]

By |January 27th, 2015|Categories: Featured Post, KCPL||0 Comments

March Mania

March Mania Book Tournament @ the Library Completed!
2015 March Mania Book Champion is:
MOCKINGJAY by Suzanne Collins
Brackets:
3rd place = Jamir Nowak
2nd place = Bryn Connelly
GRAND PRIZE WINNER = Laura Laws
Congratulations!  Thanks to everyone for participating.
Hopefully we will see you next year for the 2106 Tournament.

March 1st – April 5th
March Madness is approaching, but why should basketball fans have all the fun?!
32 of your favorite Adult/YA books of 2014 will go head to head in a battle to crown a book champion.
Vote for the round victors to be entered for the weekly raffle prize.

Round 1:  Vote for the Select Sixteen March 1-7 —> (Matchups completed)
Round 2:  Vote for the Exclusive Eight March 8-15 —> (Matchups completed)
Round 3:  Vote for the Fantastic Four March 16-22 —> (Matchups completed)
Round 4:  Vote for the Terrific Two March 23-29 —>  (Matchups completed)
Championship Round:   Vote for the 2015 March Mania Book Tournament Champion
March 31-April 5 —> (Matchup completed)

Submit your questions to KCPLMarchMania@gmail.com
Brackets: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1bYORSbBGKYNhNHx-7j64RYQTm9nBzirc5pLyWV72Fow/pub

Meet some makers at the Coder and Maker Club.

A digital clock.
An android app.
A geodesic dome.
A new career.
An online retirement calculator.
LED bracelet and messenger bag.

What do these items have in common? They are all projects in the works at the Kenton County Public Library, Coder and Maker Club that meets twice a month at the Covington library. A mix of hobbyists, professionals, artists, entrepreneurs, new computer programmers, young adults, kids, and the curious, the club is a way to connect with other makers, learn new skills, and share what you are working on. Ann Schoenenberger, who helps organize the group, says, “I don’t think we ever get over the need to share and listen like we did in Kindergarten.” (She calls that part of the meeting “show and tell.”) “We are also very busy people with lots of competition for our time and focus. The club and the library can help keep you on track and provide motivation to get things done. Best of all, you have other people to encourage you and celebrate with. ”

If you are an artist, tinkerer, like making things (anything), curious about 3D printing, Raspberry Pi or Arduino, or want to learn how to make an app or website, new members are always welcome. Join the e-newsletter or search the library event page for “Maker.”

The club is inspired and supported by the many resources the library has for learning. Find your inspiration here: Art and Creativity, Programming and Code, & Making and Technology

The Center for Great Neighborhoods in Covington recently awarded the Coder and Maker Club, B Visible Project a grant to increase pedestrian and bike safety. Read more about the grant or sign–up for the public workshops on how to add lights, LEDs and reflective tape to your clothes and accessories. Mark your calendars for […]

By |March 25th, 2015|Categories: Featured Post, KCPL||0 Comments

New Books about Autumn and Halloween

A Wynk, a Blynk and a Nod to Books about Autumn and Halloween
Where did the summer go? It’s hard to believe that we’re already thinking about Fall and Halloween. The crop of new books is simply “spooktacular,” and many of our old favorites are sure to make for ghoulish fun. So, enjoy! Happy Haunting ….. and Happy Reading!

 
 At the Old Haunted House by Helen Ketteman, illus. by Nate Wragg

Ketteman, author of Heat Wave, one of our all-time favorites, gives us a Halloween rendition of the classic rhyme “Over in the Meadow.” From goblins to vampires to bats, the creatures increase in number from one to ten. This is a stand-out begging to be read aloud.

 Dog and Bear: Tricks and Treats by Laura Vaccaro Seeger

Dog and Bear are back, just in time for Halloween. They prepare costumes, receive trick-or-treaters, and go trick-or-treating themselves. Simple text and illustrations make for a fun book for beginning readers.

 Fall Leaves by Loretta Holland, illus. by Elly MacKay

This poetic picture book captures both the art and science of the change in seasons. The ink and photography illustrations are visually appealing. This book can be used on a variety of levels. Instructions for making leaf prints are included.

 The Ghosts Go Haunting by Helen Ketteman, illus. by Adam Record

A second book by Ketteman is worth noting. This time the rhythm is that of “The Ants Go Marching” and provides another fun read aloud.

 Llama Llama Trick or Treat by Anna Dewdney

In this board book, Dewdney’s Llama Llama is excited over choosing a Halloween costume and going trick-or-treating.

 Little Boo by Stephen Wunderli, illus. by Tim Zeltner

A tiny pumpkin seed wants to be scary but must wait until it grows into a pumpkin and Halloween arrives. […]

New Books About School

A Wynk, a Blynk and a Nod to Books about School
August is coming to an end, and with that comes the start of a new school year. For many children this can be an anxious time. We’ve included lots of books to hopefully make the transition a little easier and calm those first day jitters. And for the seasoned pro, we’ve included some school stories that are just for fun!

New Books about School

B. Bear and Lolly Off to School by A.A. Livingston, illus. by Joey Chou

Evidently Baby Bear and Goldilocks became best friends after their famous encounter because now they are embarking on another adventure, their first day of school together. Children should enjoy finding other fairy tale characters in the illustrations.

 

 

 

Chu’s First Day of School by Neil Gaiman, illus. by Adam Rex

In this sequel to the New York Times best-seller, Chu’s Day, the sneeze-prone little panda is nervous about his first day of school and worried that others won’t like him. Chu’s teacher is nice and the other animals at school are friendly, but too much chalk dust leads to an explosive end.

 

 

 

Dinosaur vs. School by Bob Shea

In this sixth Dinosaur vs. book by Shea, Dinosaur faces his newest foe … school. The cartoon style illustrations provide kid-friendly humor.

 

 

 

Dinotrux Go to School by Chris Gall

In this beginning reader, it’s the first day of school for the Dinotrux and they are worried. But when you’re part dinosaur and part truck, school can be lots of fun!

 

 

 

Dog Days of School by Kelly DiPucchio, illus. by Brian Biggs

This story is reminiscent of Freaky Friday. Instead of going to school, Charlie wishes he could change places with his dog, Norman. For an entire week, Norman goes to […]

New Love and Valentine’s Day Books

A Wynk, a Blynk, and a Nod to Books about Love and Valentine’s Day
Roses are red,
Violets are blue,
Books about love
Are waiting for you!
Children love Valentine’s Day, from making cards to giving kisses to eating sweets to planning a surprise or two. Many of our selected titles focus on friendship and affection as well as the holiday itself, so why not include a few books in your holiday celebration.

 
Giveaway:  The Library has a Valentine themed basket to giveaway to one lucky reader. You have three chances to win. Be sure to do each entry separately for more chances to win. The deadline to enter is January 30 at noon. The winner will be announced on the Library Facebook page and have 24 hours to respond. How to enter:
1. Comment on the blog saying who you would share this basket with and why.
2. Tweet this post including @kentonlibrary and comment here that you did.
3. Share on Facebook tagging the Library Facebook page and comment here that you did.
Note: Library employees and those living in their household are not eligible to enter.
 
New Books about Love and Valentine’s Day
A Crankenstein Valentine by Samantha Berger, illus. by Dan Santat

An ordinary boy becomes a grumbling Crankenstein on the mushiest, yuckiest day of the year … until he meets someone just like him! The humorous illustrations include exaggerated expressions which match the size of Crankenstein’s emotions.

 

Did You Know that I Love You? by Christa Pierce

Little Bird expresses her love for Fox in this sweet picture book. The minimal rhyming text makes it a good choice for one-on-one sharing. This is the author/illustrator’s debut children’s book.

 

Foxy in Love by Emma Dodd

Foxy uses his magic to help Emily create the perfect card for the one she loves. Children […]

NKY Fandom Fest

Each year the Teen Librarians at KCPL, BCPL, and CCPL get together to host an event celebrating anime, cartoons, and comics! In the past it was known as NKY Cosplay, and is now called NKY FANDOM FEST! 

Continue reading about Fandom Fest

By |March 28th, 2014|Categories: childrens, Featured Post|Tags: , , |Comments Off

Nutcracker Voucher Giveaway

 

In a world where sugarplums dance, rats are kings and toys come to life, one little girl goes on the adventure of a lifetime through the Land of Sweets. But is it all a dream? There’s only one way to find out. Accompanied by the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra performing Tchaikovsky’s iconic score, Frisch’s Presents The Nutcracker, presented since 1974, is Cincinnati’s favorite holiday tradition. Revel in the magic as Clara and her Nutcracker Prince meet exciting characters, absorb the bright colors and enjoy the classic adventure of The Nutcracker.

PERFORMANCE DATES AND TIMES

Friday, December 19 – 7:30 pm
Tuesday, December 23 – 2:00 pm SP

Saturday, December 20 – 2:00 pm
Tuesday, December 23 – 7:30 pm

Saturday, December 20 – 7:30 pm
Friday, December 26 – 2:00 pm SP

Sunday, December 21 – 1:00 pm
Friday, December 26 – 7:30 pm

Sunday, December 21 – 5:30 pm
Saturday, December 27 – 2:00 pm

Saturday, December 27 – 7:30 pm

*SP denotes Sugar Plum Parade: Take a walk across the stage to see the sets, costumes and dancers up close!
International ballet dancers Venus Villa and Rolando Sarabia will be joining Cincinnati Ballet for several weeks this December to perform in The Nutcracker. Both Villa and Sarabia have
enjoyed distinguished careers that have allowed them opportunities to dance all over the world. Villa is originally from Cuba and has danced with the Royal Ballet, the English National Ballet
and Vienna Staatsoper Ballet. Sarabia, also from Cuba, is a gold medal winner at the International Ballet Competition in Jackson, Mississippi, as well as multiple other international competitions. They will be dancing the roles of the Snow King and Queen and the Sugar Plum Fairy and the Cavalier for select performances. Villa and Sarabia join us from Rome where they most recently appeared as guest artists with […]

Oscar Film Fest @ the Covington Library

Planning to watch the Academy Awards this year? You can start the cinematic celebration early by stopping by the Covington Branch on Friday, February 20th, to enjoy a viewing of some Oscar-winning films, courtesy of Hoopla.

We’ll be showing movies from 10am to 5pm. Popcorn will be provided and you can grab an Oscar ballot to make your guesses for this year’s winners. All completed ballots may be entered into a drawing for a prize.
Schedule:
Best of the Three Stooges -10am
In the Heat of the Night – 11am
The Sting – 1pm
The King’s Speech – 3:15
    

Hoopla is the newest digital service offered through the Kenton County Public Library. With Hoopla, you can borrow movies, music, and audiobooks – all for FREE. Hoopla works with smartphones, tablets, or your home computer. You can even watch movies with Apple TV. Just click on the link, sign up with your Library card, and you’re ready to go:

http://www.kentonlibrary.org/hoopla

    
Items are always available on Hoopla, so you’ll never have to place a hold. You may check out ten items a month and they are automatically returned at the end of the lending period—that means no  late fees ever!

Here is a list of more great films on Hoopla
Find out what’s new on Hoopla
Get the apps:

    

 

By |February 18th, 2015|Categories: at the library, Featured Post, KCPL|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Our Favorite Children’s Books of 2014

The days are counting down on not only  the holiday season, but the end of the year. If you’re still looking for that final, perfect gift for the special child (or children) in your life, check out some favorite picks of this past year from Covington Children’s Librarians , Amy Schardein & Krista King-Oaks.

For children ages 0-4:

Flashlight – Liz Boyd

A child explores the night with his flashlight – cleverly illuminating a partially hidden world.  Lovely details and a simple storyline make this book one to be enjoyed again and again.

Mix It Up – Herve Tullet 

Herve Tullet is the master of playful interactive books and this one does not disappoint. Young readers are invited to touch and rub and tilt colors together in this clever book.

Tickle- Leslie Patricelli

This sweet little board book simply shows a baby enjoying a tickle fest with the family and presents an irresistible opportunity to tickle your own little one.

For children ages 5-8:

Ivan: The Remarkable True Story of the Shopping Mall Gorilla – Katherine Applegate

Author Katherine Applegates won the Newbery award for her novel The One and Only Ivan.  Now readers can learn the facts behind the novel in this fascinating look at a captive gorilla.

Lily the Unicorn – Dallas Clayton

If you are a fan of Elephant and Piggie, then you will fall in love with Lily and her penguin friend Roger in their colorful adventure of learning about feelings and friendship and all their favorite things that make the world “awesome”.

Weasels – Elys Dolan

If I-Spy and Where’s Waldo made a book, but filled it with mischievous critters, it would be Dolan’s quirky masterpiece; so many zany and hilarious illustrations fill this minimalist picture book that  will keep readers busy discovering the jokes long after the story […]

Rereading Favorite Books

What is your favorite book? Why do you love it? Who do you talk with about your favorite stories?

When December comes and it’s snowy and tiny colored lights are blinking (or menorah candles are twinkling), it gets dark so early I don’t always want a new and exciting book. This is the time of year I grab an old favorite to reread.

Read the entire post…

By |December 27th, 2013|Categories: Featured Post|Tags: , |0 Comments

Rhythm and Rhyme: Sensory Storytime

Rhythm and Rhyme: Sensory Storytime is a monthly interactive and educational program. It is specially designed for children ages 2-6 with sensory integration challenges.

It combines the books, rhymes and music of other storytimes along with physical activities to promote learning in a sensory friendly environment. Many children with Sensory Processing Disorders are extra sensitive to loud noises, bright lights, or other strong sensory environments. In this program, the lights are dimmed, the music is not as loud, and there are minimal distractions while the program is taking place.

There is repetition from month to month so the children know what to expect. We also go over the activities for the day before beginning each program. After we share a short book, rhymes, and songs there is social time where interactive experiences are offered to the children. These activities include sensory tubs to search through, toys to play with, sidewalk chalk, bubbles, and other activities to stimulate tactile learning.

Although this program is aimed at children with Sensory Processing Disorders, if your child has difficulty sitting through one of the library’s other storytimes, this inclusive program of stories, songs, and activities may be a better fit for him or her.

If you would like to register for the program, please check our Event Calendar.

If you would like further information, please feel free to contact me at julie.mills@kentonlibrary.org regarding the Erlanger Branch programs or Joel Caithamer at joel.caithamer@kentonlibrary.org regarding the Durr Branch programs. We look forward to seeing you there!

By |March 26th, 2014|Categories: childrens, Featured Post|Tags: , , |Comments Off

Ring In the New Year with Old Favorites

Are you looking for a good read, some new to you music, a great movie or an awesome book to introduce your children to? The Kenton County Public Library has you covered with the top items checked out in 2014. 

Top adult fiction books checked out in 2014:

1. Sycamore Row, by John Grisham

2. Gone Girl, by Gillian Flynn

3. The Invention of Wings, by Sue Kidd

4. First Love, by James Patterson

5. Dark Witch, by Nora Roberts

Top YA fiction books checked out in 20141. Divergent, by Veronica Roth

2. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green

3. Catching Fire, by Suzanne Collins

4. The Hunger Games, by Suzanne Collins

5. Insurgent, by Veronica Roth

Top DVDS checked out in 2014:

1. The Hunger Games, Catching Fire

2. Gravity

3. Despicable Me 2

4. Man of Steel

5. Thor, The Dark World

Top songs downloaded from Freegal:

1. Happy (Gru’s Theme from Despicable Me 2)

2. All of Me

3. All About That Bass

4. Rude

5. Say Something

Top children’s books checked out in 2014:

1. Greg Heffley’s Journal, by Jeff Kinney

2. The Last Straw, by Jeff Kinney

3. Rodrick Rules, by Jeff Kinney

4. Dog Days, by Jeff Kinney

5. The Ugly Truth, by Jeff Kinney

Top children’s video games checked out in 2014:

1. Kirby’s Dream Collection Special Edition

2. Planes

3. Super Mario Galaxy

4. MarioKart

5. Sonic Unleashed

Top adult video games checked out in 2014:

1. Lego Marvel Super Heroes

2. The Lego Movie

3. Injustice Gods Among Us

4. Titanfall

5. Plants vs. Zombies Garden Warfare

Want to check out some of these items? Visit the library catalog to the put the items on hold. Have you read, watched or listened to any of these items? Which was your favorite?

Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps: The Earliest “Street View”

Have you wondered what your town or neighborhood looked like 100 years ago? Want to know what that large building at the end of your block was originally used for? If you answered yes, you will want to check out the Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps. In 1867, the Sanborn Map Company, which is still in business today, began making detailed fire insurance maps to help “insurance agents determine the degree of hazard associated with a particular property.”[i] The Sanborn Company estimates they created maps for 12,000 cities and towns in the United States[ii]. The maps are very intricate and detail the size, shape, placement and number of windows and doors, property boundaries, and type of business or industry located within a structure. They are also coded to reflect the various types of building material used and to distinguish residential from commercial property.

While the maps are no longer used for insurance purposes, they are now a wonderful way to supplement your historical and genealogical research. They are also essential tools for anyone interested in the history of their home or a particular structure. The maps can be used in conjunction with city directories and newspapers to locate the homes of individuals or businesses in a town and even on a specific street. Because the maps were constantly updated, researchers can track changes that took place in towns, business districts, and neighborhoods. Street addresses and street names have also changed over time, and sometimes more than once, so the maps are an excellent way to find the original address for a specific home or business.

The Local History and Genealogy Department, located on the 2nd floor of the Covington Branch, has Sanborn Maps in original map format, […]

Season’s Readings

 

It’s time for Season’s Readings at the Kenton County Public Library!
Beginning December 1, children ages 2-12 can visit any Kenton County Public Library
location and pick up a “Season’s Readings” book log. Read or listen to five books and
return your log to the Library for a prize and raffle entry. Complete as many book logs
as you like for more chances to win.

By |December 10th, 2013|Categories: childrens, Featured Post|Tags: , |Comments Off

Seasons Readings

All the children in my life know I will give them books every year for Christmas. Here are a few of my favorite books from 2013 that I would be proud to give any child. I know that for my own children, books are the gifts that keep on giving as we pass them down and reread treasured favorites for years.  Can’t afford all of these gems? Click on the covers and you can borrow them from the library.

Season’s readings!

…continue Reading this blog post

By |November 21st, 2013|Categories: Featured Post||0 Comments

Share Your Favorite Books & Movies

I have one child in middle school and one in high school. I am lucky that they both have a natural love of reading. My son will find a series he loves and read every single book (Conspiracy 365 being the most recent). Once he’s finished, he’ll look for other books written by that author. My daughter mostly chooses her books based on her friends’ recommendations but once in a while she’ll still ask Ms. Amy at the Covington Branch what she should read next. I always loved sharing children’s books with my kids but now that they are older, I really enjoy sharing some of my favorite adult and YA books with them. We are also able to discover new books together.

Continue Reading the Post…

 

By |February 18th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post|Tags: , , , |0 Comments

Simple Cooking for Teens

Maybe you think that cooking is difficult, nearly impossible or you want to kick your basic cooking skills up a notch. Maybe you’re a fast foodie or tired of your same old ramen noodle diet. Whatever your skill level the Kenton County Public Library has you covered with a variety of resources and programs.

You’re busy, you don’t have a lot of time to cook but fast food doesn’t have to be junk food. Top Ten Time Tips from Real Food, Real Fast by Sam Stern, young adult author of cookbooks for teens.

Don’t waste time wandering round your kitchen looking for an ingredient or piece of equipment. Get organized!
Vegetables chopped small take a shorter time to cook.
Need the oven? Switch it on-first thing you do.
Save time and energy by using the right size pan.
Water can take ages to boil, so try not to use too much. Get that lid on the pan for speedier heating.
Use time well. If you’re waiting for something to boil or marinate, prep something else.
Extra time suits some food like marinating meat, so do’em the day before and fridge’em.
Make more food than you need at a time. Double recipes. That’s lots of time saved and other meals taken care of.
Take opportunities. If you’ve got bread left over, make breadcrumbs and stick them in the freezer for later. Make stock from roasts. Freeze fruit for crumbles, yogurt bowls and smoothies.
Speed things up by using the right stuff. A sharp knife’s faster than a blunt one. Try a hand mixer. Get good equipment and a sharp grater.

This book might be for you, it’s organized by minutes for the length of time it takes to prep and make a recipe, check it out.

 

More Great […]

Spring Flings

A Wynk, a Blynk, and a Nod to Books about Spring
No matter how long the winter, spring is sure to follow. There are many new books about spring and spring holidays that offer a welcome respite from the gloom of winter. So, while anticipating spring’s arrival, why not check out what’s blooming at the library.
New Books about Spring
 And Then Another Sheep Turned Up by Laura Gehl, illus. by Amy Adele
Preparation and plans for a small family Passover seder are altered when the Sheep family of four is continually interrupted by unexpected guests. Kids will stay engaged with this rhyming, cumulative tale.

Bug Detective: Amazing Facts, Myths, and Quirks of Nature by Maggie Li
From butterflies to beetles to bees, this fact-filled guide encourages children to take a closer look at the insect world.

A Butterfly Called Hope by Mary Alice Monroe, photographs by Barbara J. Bergwerf
This book provides an excellent introduction to the life cycle of the monarch butterfly. Beautiful, full-color, up-close photographs accompany the text. Four pages of learning activities are also included. Free online resources are available from the publisher as well.

Butterfly Counting by Jerry Pallotta, illus. by Shennen Bersani
This unusual butterfly book introduces facts about the insects, portrays 24 different species, gives the word for “butterfly” in 27 languages other than English, and counts from zero to 25.

Click, Clack, Peep! by Doreen Cronin, illus. by Betsy Lewin
After a baby duck is born on the farm, the entire farm is disrupted as all the animals try to get the baby to sleep. This is another installment from the duo who gave us Click, Clack, Moo and Giggle, Giggle, Quack.

Crinkle, Crackle, Crack: It’s Spring! by Marion Dane Bauer, illus. by John Shelley
The charming watercolor illustrations bring this “arrival of […]

Technology Personality Types

6 technology personality types: which class sounds like you?

The Apprentice
Not all of us have used a computer, created a free email account or mastered how to use a scanner.   Are you new to computers? Maybe you have a friend or grandparent who is ready to try?  All three branches offer classes for new or inexperienced computer users. Our teachers are skilled at helping people who are just starting out. Durr even has open labs for one-to-one help.

Continue reading this post…

By |March 17th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post, KCPL|Tags: , |0 Comments

Teen Photo Contest 2015

Do you know someone in middle or high school who takes great pictures? Our annual photo contest is their chance to show off!

First prize is a $100 prepaid debit card and your photo as the cover for the KCPL Teens facebook page; 2nd prize is a $50 prepaid debit card.

(Last year’s gallery show, photos by Jessy Griffith, teen services librarian at Durr/Independence.)

All the photos will be on display at our gallery show event at the Durr/Independence Branch on Friday, January 30 at 6pm. These are open to any and everyone in the community!

Submit up to 2 JPEG images as email attachments to kcplteens@gmail.com between January 1-January 26. Include your name, grade, and contact phone or e-mail. I will send a reply after I receive your photos. If you do not get a reply email, please try again or call the library.

By entering the contest you are allowing the library to use the images in promotional materials (like this blog post [except the gallery show photo]) and galleries both online and in print.

Maximum two entries per person. Judges will be library staff and volunteers.

See all of last year’s photos here!

By |January 14th, 2015|Categories: Featured Post, teens||0 Comments

Top 10 Creative Projects You Can Make with the DigiCart

Ready to get creative?  Request an item from our “DigiCart” and forget all those excuses you have been using about not having the right technology.  Our DigiCart at the Erlanger Branch has just about everything you will need to get your project started.   We’ve created a list of projects but the possibilities are endless!

 

 

1.  Create a flyer or brochure for your small business or non-profit group.  With Adobe InDesign you can create a professional piece for your business or non-profit that just might win you a new customer or a much needed grant.  We have four MacBooks that are loaded with the full Adobe CS suite.

2.  Record a podcast.  Podcasts can be a great way to get your ideas out to a wider audience.  Not sure about podcasts?  Try searching iTunes to see all of the options that exist.  If you can think of a topic, you can create a podcast.  We have a Yeti microphone that will make you sound great!

3.  Write and illustrate a children’s picture book.  Use our Wacom drawing pad and Adobe Illustrator to write and illustrate your very own children’s book for a special child in your life.  It would be a keepsake for any child.  Consider adding pictures of the child in the book and they will be so excited to receive a personalized present.

4.  Make a playlist.  Bring in your old records and record digital versions of your favorite songs that might not be available in any other format.  If you have family members who years ago recorded music give them a digital copy of their album and they will never have to worry about scratching their vinyl.

5.  Mix and share your music.  Use GarageBand to mix […]

By |April 8th, 2015|Categories: blog, Featured Post, KCPL|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Top 10 reasons to have your friendly neighborhood teen librarian visit your middle and/or high school classroom

1.  Facebook may start labeling satirical posts so users don’t think they’re real, but you know who has been dedicated to information literacy and teaching students how to objectively evaluate information? Librarians.

 

 

2.  Are you a teacher looking for extra credit ideas? Some teachers include attending events at the library.

a. Covington has Write On!, a teen writers group, Sunday, September 7 at 2pm.

b.  Durr/Independence has Teen Crafternoon, an art program with lots of fun supplies.

c.  Erlanger has STEAM Explorers, whose meeting on Thursday, November 20, 2014, 7 – 8pm  will be all about computer programming with the Scratch! programming method. 
d.  …and tons more at each location!

3.  Do you want your students to research current topics and events from multiple angles? The Opposing Viewpoints database lets users browse issues to explore different positions on topics.

4.  Have an activity or assignment that takes up about half a class period? The librarian can take the other half!

5.  KCPL has an AWESOME* and FREE database you can get to from any computer with internet access and a KCPL Library Card that has all kinds of test prep: ACT, AP, SAT… You create a free account in the database and can stop and come back to their timed practice tests at any time. The tests are also scored, including explaining why answers are correct. A librarian can come and show your students all about this service, or if possible, we can arrange to have you visit our on-site computer labs and get library cards.

6.  In most situations, a visiting public librarian does not mind if you leave for a few minutes to have your own bathroom break.

 

 

 

7.  If you teach in Kenton County, you can get a KCPL teacher card, no matter where you […]

By |October 23rd, 2014|Categories: Featured Post, teens||0 Comments

Top Ten Fall YA Books

If you’re looking for a good book to read this fall look no further than the newest and most popular Young Adult Fiction! With several of these books being made into movies, or already on the big screen, everyone is talking about them!

Click on the titles to find the book in our online catalog and request the books for pickup, find an e-book copy, or get put on the wait list for an item.

Check out the top 10 YA books to read this autumn season:

1. The Maze Runner by James Dashner: The blockbuster movie came out in theaters last week and has been getting rave reviews! This book is a popular dystopian series.

2. The Fault in Our Stars by John Green: With the movie being released on DVD next month, TFiOS has taken the world by storm and is a must-read for all book lovers.

3. Love is the Drug by Alaya Dawn Johnson: One of the best books of the year, Alaya Dawn Johnson’s newest political and dystopian thriller releases on September 30th.

4. Unraveled by Gennifer Albin: The final book in the thrilling and unputdownable dystopian “Crewel World” series by a popular YA author.

5. The Graveyard Book – Graphic Novel by Neil Gaiman: the brand new graphic novel adaptation of the classic novel by Neil Gaiman.

6. Mortal Heart by Robin LaFevers: The 3rd book in the popular “assassin nun” series, a great historical fiction read.

7. If I Stay by Gayle Forman: With a movie soon to be released, this is a must-read for fall!

8. 100 Sideways Miles by Andrew Smith: the latest novel by an award-winning author, about first love, epilepsy, and making your own story in life.

9. Ruin & Rising by Leigh Bardugo: the final book in the extremely popular Grisha series!

10. Perfectly Good White Boy by Carrie Mesrobian: Intense realistic fiction for boys, […]

By |September 25th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post, staff picks, Teens||0 Comments

Turning Clutter Into Cash

Many people have trouble decluttering because they see their clutter as piles of cash that they spent. I know that I am less of an impulse shopper now that I have given away items that I had to have but then never used.

Decluttering is humbling. You realize you have more than you need and often wish you could have a “do over” and get that money back.

Finish reading the rest of the post…

By |April 1st, 2014|Categories: Featured Post|Tags: , , |Comments Off

What’s New at the Library in 2015?

The Kenton County Library is planning for 2015!

A new year brings new opportunities for any organization and the Library is no exception.  One of the biggest changes patrons will see in the coming year is the renovation of the Erlanger Branch.  The branch has been open for over 12 years and has seen foot traffic of more than 5.5 million visitors.  As you can imagine, this puts a lot of wear and tear on the building.  A number of the chairs in the building have already been replaced and refinished.  Currently, many of the floor coverings are also being replaced.  This includes all of the carpets in the building.  Can you imagine a carpet that has been walked on by the feet of over 5.5 million people?  We are replacing some of the carpeting with industrial squares that will be more durable and more easily replaced.  Other high traffic areas will be replaced with rubber tile.  These two fixes will give a new and fresh look to the building and cut down dramatically on trip hazards.  Later in the year we hope to be able to paint the interior of the building.

The Library will also be working on meeting the goals of its strategic plan.  In 2015, we will be focusing on three major initiatives.  Our Children’s Departments and Outreach Department will be focusing on increasing attendance at programs that promote early childhood literacy which is so important to our families and community.  Currently our staff visit practically every public, private and parochial school in the county.  We will be working diligently to increase these visits and encourage students to use our traditional and online materials in their school work.  We will also be […]

Will your child be ready?

Helping young children be ready to learn to read does not have to be hard – in fact, the best ways are simple and inexpensive. Here are my top five tips:

 

Play! Items you already have around the house make great toys that don’t break the bank. Boxes, tubes, pots and pans and old magazines are all tons of fun for young children.  Simple toys encourage creativity and imagination.

Sing! Singing develops phonological awareness by helping children to hear the smaller parts of words. Songs can also introduce new vocabulary while cementing the bond between child and caregiver.  Don’t worry about how well you sing – I promise your child will love it no matter what.  If you are stumped for songs, you can check out or download music from the library.

Talk! Make eye contact and talk with your child. Research shows again and again that talking with children builds their vocabulary and understanding of the world around them.  A voice on the television or caregivers talking to other adults near a child does not have the same affect. Respond to your children when they babble or talk and give them new words to use.

Read!  I hear from parents all the time about children who won’t sit still for the 20 recommended daily reading minutes.  Since I can barely do that either, I have a great deal of sympathy for those children.  It is fine if children stand (or walk, or run!) while sharing books. You can also break your time into smaller chunks. Read while you are waiting for appointments or in the check out line at the store. Sneak in a book during snack time or while your child is in the bath.

Write! Children […]

By |April 2nd, 2015|Categories: Featured Post, KCPL||0 Comments

You & Your Pets

Pets are an integral parts of our families, our lives, and our hearts. Whether you have cats, dogs, fish, a snake, a family of tarantulas or ferrets, you understand the importance of those amazing creatures and the impact they have on you and your life.

Continue Reading the Post…

By |January 28th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post|Tags: , , |0 Comments