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Library Providing Services at Home

Library Providing Services at Home

About to celebrate her 90th birthday, Mrs. Jackie Linneman can honestly say she has had a lifelong relationship with the public library system.  An avid reader from a very young age, Jackie fondly recalls her trips to the former location of the public library in Covington.  In fact, the Carnegie Library at 10th and Scott was her first library.

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By |February 6th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post|Tags: , |0 Comments

10 Tips to a Great Thanksgiving Meal

Does holiday meal planning have you stressing out?  Do not worry I am here to help! Below I have compiled a list of 10 ways to help make your Thanksgiving meal a little less stressful.  I have also linked some fantastic resources that are available through the library.

Create your guest list and send out invites via email, text messaging, or social media. Ask guest to let you know if there are dietary restrictions and plan on how you will accommodate those restrictions. I usually create a Facebook event.
Do not put off your grocery shopping to the last minute. Not because the store will run out of food, but it is crazy busy at the grocery the week of Thanksgiving. Purchase what you can ahead of time.  I purchased cranberry sauce a month ago!
Create a checklist   – include all menu items you will be preparing; include the cooking times and temps for each item. Plan when each item needs to be cooked.  Please take into consideration that the turkey will be in the oven for 6-8 hours, depending on the weight.
Make sure the turkey is completely thawed. Have everything you need to season the turkey ready to go before you start preparing the turkey. If it is your first time, preparing a turkey, prepare yourself on the fact that you will have to grab out the neck and giblets. It is somewhat gross! I am glad I am not in charge of the turkey this year.
If you are hosting Thanksgiving for your family and friends, you can ask them to bring a dish. I usually ask people to bring specific dishes, so I do not have five people bringing mashed potatoes.
[…]

100 Years Ago, Latonia Jockey Reached Horse Racing’s Pinnacle

 

On May 27, 1914 a record crowd gathered at the historic Epsom Downs in England for the annual running of the world’s greatest horse race, the English Derby.  The dramatic death of suffragette Emily Davison on the track the year prior and the nearly unprecedented 30 horse field drew a large crowd who knew that quite anything could happen at the annual event.[1]  The tension mounted precipitously at the post line as the horses waited for the starter’s signal.  Matt McGee, an American jockey born and raised in Covington sitting atop of his fine colt Durbar II, stared down the track towards the outside rail and saw the crowd favorite Kennymore growing anxious for the start.  At 9-4 odds, and with Europe’s top jockey and future racing Hall of Famer Frank O’Neill aboard, the horse was thought to be shoo-in for victory, even with the crowded field.   The other rival for the title, Brakespear, owned by none other than the King of England himself, waited patiently close to the inside rail.  The 20 minutes standing at the line must have seemed like an eternity for the horse, however, as he frequently backed away from the starting tape.  The signal to go caught Brakespear off-guard and led to a poor start while the anxious Kennymore took off perpendicular to the rest of the field, racing directly towards the inside rail.

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By |April 11th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on 100 Years Ago, Latonia Jockey Reached Horse Racing’s Pinnacle

13 Reasons to Watch Fuller House

By Gina Stegner

I can’t begin to tell you how excited I was to find out Fuller House, basically an extension of Full House, was being made last year. I binge watched the new show on Netflix in two days. When I heard we would find out who D.J. Tanner married, how she became single, what had happened in Kimmy Gibbler’s life, see Stephanie all grown up, hear the jokes about Michelle and see Danny, Uncle Jessy and Joey again I thought… “Have Mercy!” I grew up with Full House, my kids watched reruns. I could relate to the Tanner girls. And now, D.J. is all grown up and a mom just like me. Pretty cool.

To make it even better, Fuller House is releasing a second season on Dec. 9 on Netflix. According to TV Guide, D.J. will continue to find herself in a love triangle, Stephanie will find a weird new boyfriend and Kimmy will try to move on from her ex-husband. So why should you watch?

The 13 top reasons, in no certain order, to watch the second season of Fuller House on Netflix:

Rumor has it that the New Kids on the Block will appear in at least one episode.
Candace Cameron Bure (D.J. Tanner) hints that we will learn more about her and Kimmy’s kids this season.
D.J. will choose between her high school sweetheart Steve and work romance Matt.
D.J.’s ex-boyfriend Nelson, played by someone other than the original Nelson, will make an appearance on the show.
We will finally meet Kimmy Gibbler’s brother.
D.J.’s ex-best friend Kathy Santoni (also portrayed by a different actor) will make an appearance.
We will meet Joey’s wife and kids.
Kimmy’s brother is rumored to be Stephanie’s boyfriend (Oh Mylanta!).
We […]

130th Anniversary of the Covington Ladies Home

2016 marks the 130th year of operation for the Covington Ladies Home located at 702 Garrard Street in the Licking Riverside Historic District. The organization, originally called the Home for Aged and Indigent Women (still visible in the stone above the main entrance today), was founded in 1886 by Covington resident Ellen B. Dietrick, an early advocate for equality and education for women, with the goal of providing care for women over the age of 60. Today, 130 years later, the mission of the Covington Ladies Home is the same, “to serve senior women, regardless of their economic circumstances, by providing high quality personal care in a community based and homelike environment.”

In February 1884, the Ohio River reached a level of 71 feet devastating Covington and surrounding communities. Dietrick, concerned about the plight of many women and families displaced by the flood, joined with other Covington women to form the Women’s Educational and Industrial Union. The Union provided training classes and an employment bureau for women in need. Particularly concerned about women over 60 with no family or financial support, Ellen created the Home for Aged and Indigent Women with the goal of providing care and shelter. The Home became an independent organization in 1887 and was incorporated by the Kentucky General Assembly in March 1888.

Ellen Battelle Dietrick was born in Morgantown, Virginia (now West Virginia), to Reverend Gordon Battelle (1814-1862) and Maria L. Tucker (1818-1899) in 1847. Gordon Battelle was a Methodist minister, educator, and delegate to the West Virginia’s Constitutional Convention in 1861. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he volunteered for service with the First Virginia Volunteers (a Union unit), but, sadly, died in 1862 of Typhoid Fever, possibly contracted while […]

By |April 29th, 2016|Categories: Featured Post, KCPL||1 Comment

2015 Haunt Your Library Writing Contest Winners

Congratulations to the following children and teens whose stories will be featured as part of the Kenton County Public Library Halloween Writing Contest. Since 2002, hundreds of creative children and teens have entered their creative spooky stories into the contest.

This year, over 130 stories were submitted. While all the stories were wonderful, the following have been selected and will be featured in the Community Recorder the week of October 26, 2015:
Grades 1-3
First Place Poetry Winner – Halloween Night by James M. – Age 8

 

Second Place Poetry Winner:   “Halloween’s Coming” by Devin W. – Age 8
Third Place Poetry Winner: “Halloween is Coming!” by Jayla M. – Age 8

First Place Prose Winner – All I Want Is a Pumpkin Pie by Ruth M. – Age 6

 

 

Second Place Prose Winner: “The Pumpkin” by Jude H. – Age 8
Third Place Prose Winner: “The Castle” by Eleanor D. – Age 8
Grades 4-6
First Place Poetry Winner – Spooky by Elizabeth M. – Age 12

 

 

 

Second Place Poetry Winner: “In Just One Night” by Kenzie J. – Age 12
Third Place Poetry Winner: “Halloween Party” by Julia G. – Age 10

First Place Prose Winner – Scary Encounter by James T. – Age 10

 

Second Place Prose Winner: “The Haunted Library” by Madison K. – Age 9
Third Place Prose Winner: “Halloween Night” by Piper L. – Age 9
Grades 7-12
First Place Poetry Winner – The Ground on Which You Stood by Kelsey B. – age 12

 

First Place Prose Winner – Rumors by Audrey D. – age 12

 

 

 

Second Place Prose Winner: “Forgotten House” by Nicholas C. – age 14
Third Place Prose Winner: “The Halloween” by Natalie F. – age 12

By |October 23rd, 2015|Categories: Featured Post, KCPL, teens, Teens||0 Comments

2016 Haunt Your Library Writing Contest Winners

The Library is pleased to announce the winners of this year’s Halloween writing contest. This was our 14th year in conducting this contest, and we had nearly 100 entries. Over twenty area schools were represented, including the homeschool community.  Several teachers even incorporated this into their curriculum, having the entire class submit entries. We are pleased to have this sort of support among the educational community.

As librarians, we know the importance of reading and developing a child’s reading skills, especially through hands-on, active learning opportunities. Having a child create an original story or poem promotes the advancement of those skills.
Grades 1-3
First Place Poetry Winner – “A Halloween Limerick” by Kay Mayer, Age 6 Homeschool, Villa Hills, KY, Grade 1
Second Place Poetry Winner:   “A Witch has a Black Hat” by Alexandra Mechlin, Age 8 Ryland Heights Elementary, Grade 3                                                                
Third Place Poetry Winner: “Haunted School” by Lilly Hunt, Age 7 St. Anthony School, Grade 2                                                                                                            

First Place Prose Winner – “Being Watched” by Joseph Mayer, Age 8 Homeschool, Villa Hills, KY, Grade 3
Second Place Prose Winner: “A Scary Romance” by Ruth Maier, Age 7 Blessed Sacrament School, Grade 2                                             
Third Place Prose Winner: “Hook!” by Iris Laile, Age 7 Prince of Peace, […]

By |November 1st, 2016|Categories: Featured Post, KCPL, teens, Teens||0 Comments

32+ speeches, songs, films, comics and books for MLK Day

One of the ways to honor the memory and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is to learn more about the history of social justice and civil rights on this day and every day. We have many books, movies, speeches and audiobooks to explore and deepen your knowledge. Below you’ll find links to our digital collections that you can access anytime with your library card number and email, some ways to reflect on MLK Day and events in NKY and Cincinnati where you can celebrate with others.

 
National Book Award Winning: March: Book One

Read, Watch & Listen
Films
      
Ebooks
              
Kid and adult ebooks and audiobooks from Overdrive on civil rights
  
Stream and download music and spoken word
  Stream or download his and other great speeches.

  Search for social and civil rights music new and old.
Reflect
Reflect on these articles on how to celebrate MLK Day:
Do’s and Don’ts of Celebrating MLK Day
Going the Extra Mile for MLK Day
Teaching MLK With the Social Justice Standards

Services & Ways to Serve
Northern Kentucky
Dr. Monica Posey, President Cincinnati State Technical and Community College will be the Keynote Speaker at the Northern Kentucky Branch, NAACP 14th Annual Dr. Martin L. King, Jr. Community Outreach Luncheon. Tickets are $40.00 and can be purchased by contacting the NAACP at 859-442-7476, or at the door the day of the luncheon.

In honor of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day and in solidarity with the diverse people of our community, NKY Unites! will present its second peaceful demonstration for unity. The demonstration will take place in Florence, Kentucky on Saturday, January 14th from noon to 1:45 p.m.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Annual Breakfast
9:30 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 14, 2017 
Church of Our Savior
246 East 10th Street
Covington, KY 41011
Information: Sister Janet Bucher, (859) 491-5872

Annual Northern Kentucky Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.  March
1:30 […]

By |January 13th, 2017|Categories: blog, Featured Post||0 Comments

7 Last Minute Gift Ideas

It’s December 23rd and you just realized you are missing a gift for your great aunt or maybe it’s your nephew or the neighbor. Our staff got together and came up with a few ideas for the last minute shopper.

1. DIY gifts can be a great money saver and something the gift receiver will truly enjoy. A bag or basket of your favorite cookies, candies or nuts is easy to personalize. You can even dress it up with a final addition of your favorite local coffee or adult brew. Everyone enjoys cuddling up with a good movie or book and a bunch of treats. Sticking with the DIY theme, you can also make an ornament or a card for someone special.

2. I personally love movie night baskets. It can include one or two DVDs, candy and popcorn. You can often find a great old movie for under $10.

3. Books and music are extremely easy to find and can be very inexpensive. We suggest The Mockingjay Part 1 Soundtrack along with a Mockingjay charm or even a new set of The Hunger Games paperback books. You can personalize it by giving your favorite CD or book in hopes of introducing the gift receiver to new music or a new author.

4. A magazine subscription can be a great gift and you can often find online deals like two years for the price of one. Grab a copy of that magazine from the local store to wrap and include a note telling the gift giver they now have a subscription.

5. Chocolates, old fashioned candies, hot chocolate gift pack, coffee gift pack and gourmet food baskets are great last minute gifts too. You can often pick these up at […]

92 Days of Summer

92 Days of Summer Giveaways is back! #92days of summer is the length of the Kenton County Public Library Summer Reading Club – June 1-August 31 – and we will be giving prizes away every single day on our Facebook page! Summer can be an exciting adventure but many children get bored quickly. Shoot, even the adults do. So the Kenton County Public Library has you covered with our list of suggested activities and books for #92daysofsummer and giveaways for outings and fun stuff to do at home. This is a long list so print it off to hang on the fridge, mark things on your calendar or check the post often. Also be sure to check the Library Calendar of Events for additional activities.

We will also be giving away prizes EVERY SINGLE DAY of the 92 Days of Summer on our Facebook page so be sure to check it out every day. In addition to the prize listed for each day, we will give away a Reis Promotions tote bag and a free one-year subscription to Kentucky Monthly every single day.

#92daysofsummer

Book:  Rules of Summer
Activity:  Ice Cream Social
Giveaway:  Ice Cream Social Prize Pack
Book:  Silly Circus Tricks
Activity:  Sign up for camp at Circus Mojo
Giveaway:  Free Week of Summer Camp at Circus Mojo (Valid: Week of June 6)
Book:  Cincinnati Reds Legends
Activity:  Take in a baseball game
Giveaway:  Cincinnati Reds Ticket Vouchers
Book:  Wonder Woman At Super Hero High                                                                                                                              […]

Anti-German Hysteria in Greater Cincinnati

My ancestor, Louis Lang, then going by the name Ludwig, emigrated from his home in Alsace-Lorraine in 1895 when he was 15 years old. On the passenger list for the ship traveling from Antwerp, Belgium to New York City, his family listed that they were headed directly for Cynthiana, Kentucky, where Louis’s eldest brother was a farmer.

Louis lived a normal life: he got married and had two daughters, subsequently divorced his wife, and spent the rest of his life as a farming bachelor before dying at the age of 47.

This all seems pretty straightforward, but Louis caused some confusion for me when I started to research him

I first read Louis’s name when I found my great-grandmother, at the age of 14 months, with her family on the 1910 census. It was there that I saw Louis was listed as a naturalized American, born in Germany. Since both of his parents were listed as also being born in Germany, I simply assumed that that side of my family was German.

But, I noticed on the 1920 census that my great-great-grandfather Louis was no longer claiming his German heritage. This time around, he listed his birthplace as France despite his native tongue still being listed as German. The 1920 census also listed Louis’s parents as being French instead of the previously stated German.

Some may argue that the reason Louis changed his country of origin was due to Alsace-Lorraine reverting from German back to French terrain. After all, in 1870, only ten years before the Langs left Europe, the region had belonged to France. (The history of the Alasce-Lorraine territory is very complicated and convoluted. Including any sort of summarization of the difficulties the region went through would […]

Baseball and Beer: A Look at the Wiedemann Baseball Club

Summer is almost here and with it comes a lot of baseball and fine beer. After all the two go hand and hand. So lets visit a local baseball team from the past, that was closely related to the beer industry. During the early 1900s baseball was played everywhere and by everybody even women! There were often police ordinances established to prevent youngsters from playing ball in the streets in towns and cities across the area. Many businesses had their own teams, sometimes comprised of employees while others had experienced players on their teams.

Several Breweries in the Northern Kentucky area aside from being in the beer making business also dabbled in the world of baseball. Breweries such as the Bavarian Brewing Company, Heidelberg Brewery and the George Wiedemann Brewing Company all at one point in time fielded baseball clubs. The Wiedemann Club and Heidelberg club played around the same time and even faced each other on several occasions. The most prominent though was the Wiedemann Baseball Club also known as the ‘Brewers’ They were a Semi-Pro team that played baseball in Newport, Kentucky. According to team letterhead from 1909 the club was organized sometime in 1903.

 

The above letterhead from the August “Garry” Hermann papers obtained from the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Hermann owned the Cincinnati Reds from 1902 to 1927. He also had a stint as the president of the National Baseball Commission. This particular letterhead was part of a note sent to Hermann from Wiedemann manager Arthur Nieman. Notice how the letter head proclaims the club as being leaders in Semi-Professional Baseball.

While researching the club between 1903 and 1907 other than a few game announcements and outcomes not many details […]

Biking in Northern Kentucky

There are many ways to explore beautiful Northern Kentucky and its surrounding areas. One of our favorite ways is to experience it on a bike! Biking groups hit the roads for a day or for weekend adventures. Families can leisurely explore hidden bike paths in our NKY parks. Bike trails sprawl across the countryside and merge into city areas which allow access to everyone making cycling a recreational sport for all! Here are some links to check out before making plans for your next biking excursion! Maybe some will peak your interest and get you back on a bike!

Books:

Mountain Biking in Kentucky
The Red Bicycle: The Extraordinary Story of One Ordinary Bicycle
Be Safe on Your Bike
Tracers
Life is a Wheel : Love, Death, etc., and A Bike Ride Across America
The Bicycling Big Book of cycling for beginners : everything a new cyclist needs to know to gear up and start riding
Bike safety : a crash course
The Bike Lesson
Duck On a Bike

Safety:
Biking Safety

Local Bike Shops:
Reser Bicycle
Velocity
Montgomery Cyclery

Bike Rental:
Cincy Red Bike

Road Routes & Trails:
Trail Link
OKI
Map My Ride
Cincinnati USA
Licking River Greenway

Groups:
BG Cycling
Team Cycling and Fitness

“Nothing compares to the simple pleasure of riding a bike.” ~ John F. Kennedy

By |August 19th, 2015|Categories: Featured Post, KCPL||0 Comments

A Book is a Book is a Book

A Wynk, a Blynk, and a Nod to Books  about Books, Libraries, and Reading

Children’s Book Week is an annual celebration of children’s books and the joy of reading. Established in 1919 at the urging of Franklin K. Mathiews, Librarian of the Boy Scouts of America, Children’s Book Week is the longest running national literacy initiative in the country. Its original intent was to focus attention on the need for quality children’s books and the importance of childhood literacy. The need for Children’s Book Week today is as essential as it was in 1919. The celebration is the first full week in May and this year runs from May 4-10. There are lots of great children’s books that are about books, reading, and libraries. This seemed to be the perfect opportunity to showcase those titles, both new and old.

 

Any Questions? by Marie-Louise Gay

Gay answers the question, “Where does a story start?” She provides information on how a book is made, and her illustrations, full of splotches of color, bits of collage, scribbles, and scratched-out words, make each spread look like a delightfully disordered work in progress.

 

 

The Book with No Pictures by B.J. Novak

In this book with no pictures, the reader has to say every silly word, no matter what. This is great kid-friendly comedy, perfect for a crowd or one-on-one sharing!

 

 

Books for Me! by Sue Fliess, illus. by Mike Laughead

This third story in the series pays tribute to the many types of books available at the library. The sing-song text and adorable illustrations create a fun story about finding just the right book.

 

 

The Boy and the Book by David Michael Slater, illus. by Bob Kolar

In this nearly wordless picture book, a young boy carelessly mishandles a library […]

Books about Snow for Children

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The Weather Outside is Frightful …”
… but reading is so delightful!
A Wynk, a Blynk and a Nod to Books about Snow

The first book that always comes to mind when we think of winter is the classic story of The Snowy Day, written and illustrated by Ezra Jack Keats. This 1963 Caldecott Award winner was groundbreaking as it showcased an African-American child as the central character. Recently published, A Poem for Peter: The Story of Ezra Jack Keats and the Creation of THE SNOWY DAY, pays homage to this children’s classic. Written by Andrea Davis Pinkney and illustrated by Lou Fancher and Steve Johnson, the story of Keats and his infamous little boy in the red snowsuit are brought to life through lyrical text and acrylic, collage, and pencil illustrations.

New Picture Books

Andy & Sandy and the First Snow by Tomie dePaola and Jim Lewis, illus. by Tomie dePaola

Tomie dePaola is a Caldecott and Newbery Honor winning author and illustrator. Lewis is an Emmy Award winning writer for The Muppets. They have collaborated on this new easy reader series about friendship. In this episode, Sandy wants to play outside in the snow, but Andy is not so sure. This book is perfect for those just beginning to read on their own.

 

Bears in the Snow by Shirley Parenteau, illus. by David Walker

Big Brown Bear comes up with a fun solution when his four little bear cubs can’t all fit on the sled. The soft illustrations and lyrical text make for a fun read-aloud.

 

 

Best in Snow by April Pulley Sayre

This prolific writer of non-fiction has created another visually stunning work. The wintery world of snow, ice, and frost is depicted through amazing photographs and simple verse.

 

 

Before Morning by […]

Books as Gifts

Library Staff Recommended Books As Gifts
Whether you are shopping for a newborn or a 90-year-old, books can make fantastic gifts. Several of our staff members have put together a list of books they think would make wonderful gifts.

 

Babies/Toddlers 

All Fall Down by Helen Oxenbury

Charlie Chick (pop-up book) by Nick Denchfield and Ant Parker

Barnyard Dance By Sandra Boynton

Where is Baby’s Belly Button?  by Karen Katz

 

Preschool
The Princess and the Pony by Kate Beaton

Interstellar Cinderella by Deborah Underwood

Waiting by Kevin Henkes

Ninja, Ninja, Never Stop! Hardcover by Todd Tuell

Don’t let the Pigeon Drive the bus by Mo Willems

 

School Age

Rump: The True Story of Rumpelstiltskin by Liesl Shurtliff

Inside Out and Back Again by Thanhha Lai

The Marvels by Brian Selznick

Wonder by R.J. Jarimillo

Holes by Louis Sachar

Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Old School by Jeff Kinney

 

Young Adults

The Crossover by Kwame Alexander

Simon Vs. The Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli

Saint Anything by Sarah Dessen

Red Queen by Victoria Aveyard

Vanishing Girls by Lauren Oliver

A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J. Maas

5 to 1 by Holly Bodger

We Are All Made of Molecules by Susin Nielson

Bone Gap by Laura Ruby

Mosquitoland by David Arnold

The Glass Arrow by Kristen Simmons

The Wrath and the Dawn—Ahdieh

An Ember in the Ashes—Tahir

Lumberjanes—Stevenson

Under a Painted Sky–Lee

 

Graphic Novels
Ms. Marvel vol. 1 by G. Willow Wilson and Adrian Alphona

Deadpool: The Complete Collection vol. 1 by Daniel Way and Andy Diggle

Fiction

City on Fire Garth Risk Hallberg

The Martian by Andy Weir

 

Nonfiction

Kissinger: 1923-1968 The Idealist- Niall Ferguson.

The Witches: Salem 1692 by Stacy Schiff

Country Living American Style: Decorate * Create * Celebrate
Want to read the book but don’t want to buy it? Visit http://catalog.kentonlibrary.org/eg/opac/home to put the item on hold at the Kenton County Public Library. Have you read any of these books? What do you think?
 

 

 

 

 

By |December 11th, 2015|Categories: Book Lists, Featured Post, KCPL||0 Comments

Bygone Buildings: Covington’s Changing Cityscape

Have you ever driven past an empty lot and wondered what was there before the asphalt and crabgrass? A surface lot, or even a new building in the heart of Covington, was likely erected upon the spot where another building once stood. Covington’s built environment has many intact and preserved buildings dating back as far as the early 1800s, but you might find a photo of a building in Faces and Places that you don’t recognize that was lost to development, fire, or perceived obsolescence. Here are a few examples of buildings of historic and stylistic distinction that once stood in Covington, but are now gone.

Holmes’ Castle is likely the most well-known example of lost architecture in Covington. This palatial home was the second location of Covington Public High School. The high school was originally located on Russell Street, near 12th Street, and was also torn down. Holmes’ Castle was built by Daniel Henry Holmes, a wealthy retailer. It was designed in the Gothic Revival style, which can be identified by its pointed arch windows and church-like details. With its sprawling grounds and lavishly appointed interior, Holmesdale was not D. H. Holmes’ only residence, and in 1915 (seventeen years after his death), his surviving family sold the property to the Covington School Board. The high school was moved into the residence until 1936, when it was razed and a new building constructed in its place. The décor and furnishings that remained were auctioned, and what didn’t sell was unceremoniously burned in the football field.

The Amos Shinkle Mansion is one particularly polarizing example of Gothic Revival architecture that once stood at 165 E. 2nd Street—people seem to either find it grand and exciting, or stuffy […]

Caring for Seniors During the Holidays

With all the hustle and bustle the holiday seasons brings it can become overwhelming quickly and we can easily forget about those who may need extra attention during the holiday season. The holidays can be tough for senior citizens who may not be able to attend holiday parties (due to physical limitations) or travel to see their family (health conditions prevent them from flying or driving for long periods). Holidays can also bring back fond and emotional memories of loved ones passed. These memories can make the holidays tough to get through. You may find that some of your senior friends, neighbors or those you work with moods have changed. During the holiday season it is not uncommon for senior citizens to experience the holiday blues.

With the holidays approaching I cannot help but think of the Homebound patrons the Kenton County Public Library Outreach department serves. Some of our patrons have no family or their family members live out of town. So, what can we do to help our patrons, senior neighbors, grandparents and our senior friends through the holidays? Listed below and some tips on how to cheer up senior citizens during the holiday season.

Sit and chat with them for a while. You might be the only human contact they have throughout the holiday season. Allow them to reminisce about holidays past.
Holiday cards: Send a holiday card to your neighbor, friend or relative who may be alone for the holiday season. Let them know you are thinking about them and you wish the very best holiday season. I can tell you from experience this can really make their day and they will talk about it for months afterwards.
Invite them over for a holiday […]

By |October 14th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post, KCPL, Outreach||0 Comments

Celebrate Your Heritage During Family History Month – October 2014

October is Family History Month, and what better time to celebrate your family’s heritage!

Tracing the heritage of your family can produce so many insights into the struggles and the accomplishments of one’s ancestors – the story of why your family came to live in a certain place, how family members learned a trade, what religious, fraternal or civic organizations your ancestors belonged to, what sort of awards and recognitions your ancestors received, who might be your distant cousins. With the ever-increasing amount of information available in print and online, researching the lives of your predecessors has never been easier – and more complicated at the same time! So, where to begin?

The best way to begin a family history project is to start in the present and work backwards in time – from the known to the unknown. Gather up any family documents, talk to older relatives, and peruse family photographs. Look for birth, marriage, and death information on your family members, as these are the “building blocks” of a family tree. As you work your way backwards in time, also take note of family friends, neighbors and associates. Knowing about them can sometimes provide clues to your own family’s stories.

But what do you do when you finally hit that “brick wall” in your research? What steps can you take to discover more about your ancestors’ lives? To help you with your research and in honor of Family History Month, the Local History and Genealogy department is offering a variety of programs in October to enhance your family heritage sleuthing.

The month begins with a program titled, “Did He Say Regiment, Squadron, Battalion, Destroyer or Attack Transport?” presented by Bill Stolz on Thursday, October 2nd at […]

Celebrating Women of Character, Courage and Commitment

A Wynk, a Blynk, and a Nod to Women’s History Month
Before 1970, women’s history was rarely the subject of serious consideration. However, two significant factors contributed to its emergence as a topic worthy of study. The women’s movement of the sixties caused women to examine their exclusion from traditional American history textbooks. Second, the study of history in general was being transformed, and women’s history was a part of this movement that ultimately transformed the study of history in the United States. History had traditionally meant political history – a study of the key political events and of the leaders, primarily men, who influenced them. However, by the 1970’s, social history began replacing the older style.

Women’s History Month in the United States began as a small-town school event, “Women’s History Week,” in Sonoma County, California in 1978. The week that was selected included March 8, International Women’s Day. In 1981, Senator Orrin Hatch of Utah and Representative Barbara Mikulski of Maryland co-sponsored a joint Congressional resolution proclaiming a national Women’s History Week. In 1987, after much lobbying by the National Women’s History Project (NWHP), Congress expanded the celebration to a full month, and March was declared Women’s History Month. Between 1988 and 1994, Congress passed additional resolutions requesting and authorizing the President to proclaim March of each year as Women’s History Month. Since 1995, U. S. Presidents have issued annual proclamations designating March as Women’s History Month.
The NWHP, founded in 1980, remains a national clearinghouse for multicultural women’s history information. Each year this organization selects a theme that highlights achievements by distinguished women in specific fields, from medicine and the environment to art and politics. The theme for 2014 is “Celebrating Women of Character, […]

Check Out These Oscar Winners

The Oscars took place last night with Leonardo DiCaprio finally winning his first Oscar for The Revenant. This was DiCaprio’s sixth nomination but his first win.

The following movies were nominated for best picture:

The Big Short

Bridge of Spies

Brooklyn

Mad Max: Fury Road

The Martian

The Revenant

Room

Spotlight   – best picture

Inside Out – best animated feature film

You can click on the movie title to be put the item on hold at the Kenton County Public Library. What was your favorite movie of 2015? Were you excited to see DiCaprio finally take home a win?

By |February 29th, 2016|Categories: Featured Post, KCPL||0 Comments

Children’s Books Celebrating African American History Month That Will Inspire You

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Because of Them, We Can …”
Celebrating African American History Month   
Our nation’s celebration of black history was expanded to a full month in 1976, the year of our nation’s bicentennial. At President Gerald R. Ford’s urging, Americans were encouraged to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.” In February, 1976, fifty years after the first black history celebration, the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History held the first African American History Month. By this time, the entire nation had come to recognize the importance of African American history in the drama of the American story. Each year, many children’s books that focus on African American history are published. February is the perfect time to introduce those titles!

New Picture Books
The First Step: How One Girl Put Segregation on Trial by Susan E. Goodman, illus. by E.B. Lewis

In 1847 four year old Sarah Roberts was removed from her all white school in Boston and told she could not return. Her parents fought back, and though they lost the case in court, their actions set in motion the events which led to Boston voluntarily integrating its schools in 1855. Lewis’s illustrations effectively capture the historical era and mood of the times.

 

Freedom in Congo Square by Carole Boston Weatherford, illus. by R. Gregory Christie

Slaves in New Orleans, Louisiana were allowed to congregate on Sundays in Congo Square to make music, sing and dance. The poetic text and folk-art style illustrations combine to pay homage to this bit of African American history.

 

 

Freedom over Me: Eleven Slaves, Their Lives and Dreams Brought to Life by Ashley Bryan

Bryan uses historical slave documents from the 1820’s […]

Children’s Summer Reading Suggestions

 

By |May 26th, 2016|Categories: Featured Post||0 Comments

Cincinnati Ballet’s Alice (in Wonderland) Giveaway

 
It’s always tea time in wonderland. Everyone is invited to tea with Alice in wonderland! When guests reach the bottom of the rabbit hole, they should promptly follow the White Rabbit (he’s got a very important date). He will escort them to the tea party, where they will be greeted by various guests. Don’t feel obliged to answer the Mad Hatter when he asks why a raven is like a writing desk (unless you know the answer). Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dum are sure to fly by and the Cheshire Cat is slated to make an appearance, but you never know when he’ll disappear. Guests do not want to offend the Red Queen or they might end up losing their heads!
PERFORMANCE DATES AND TIMES

Friday, February 13 – 8:00 pm
Sunday, February 15 – 1:00 pm

Saturday, February 14 – 2:00 pm
Sunday, February 15 – 5:30 pm

Saturday, February 14 – 8:00 pm

Tickets can be purchased by visiting the Cincinnati Ballet’s website. Tickets range from $32-$100. The Cincinnati Ballet has partnered with the Kenton County Public Library to offer 20% off to Library patrons. Just use the code G1415KenLib to receive the discount.
Giveaway: The Cincinnati Ballet has provided the Library with a voucher for two tickets (date and time of your choice) to Alice (in wonderland) to giveaway to one lucky reader. You have three chances to win. Be sure to do each entry separately for more chances to win. The deadline to enter is Jan. 14 at noon. The winner will be announced on the Library Facebook page and have 24 hours to respond. How to enter:
1. Comment on the blog saying who you would tag with you and why.
2. Tweet this post including @kentonlibrary and comment here that you did.
3. Share on Facebook tagging […]

Cincinnati Ballet’s Peter Pan Flash Ticket Giveaway

For those who never want to grow up, there’s Never Never Land. Luckily, for the Darling family children, Wendy, John and Michael, there’s Peter Pan to guide them through this magical place full of pirates and Indians and Lost Boys. The foursome (with the help of the mischievous Tinkerbell) fly to Never Never Land where the cranky pirate Captain Hook, a hungry crocodile and more adventures await. Follow along on this swashbuckling journey, past the second star to the right and straight on ’til morning, as these classic characters learn what growing up is really all about. The Kenton County Public Library would like to help one lucky winner experience Never Never Land. See the giveaway details below.

 
Tickets can be bought at the box office or by visiting the Cincinnati Ballet Website.
 

Friday, November 7 – 8:00 pm

Saturday, November 8 – 2:00 pm

Saturday, November 8 – 8:00 pm

Sunday, November 9 – 2:00 pm

 
Giveaway
The library has a voucher for two tickets to the performance time of your choice. Library employees and those living in their household cannot enter to win. A winner will be chosen randomly by the end of the day on Wednesday, Nov. 5. The winner will be announced on the Kenton County Public Library’s Facebook page and will have 24 hours to respond to claim the voucher. The voucher must be picked up at one of the Kenton County Public Library locations.

How to enter:

Comment on this post stating why you want to win.
Share this post on Facebook or Twitter and comment here stating that you did. (Entries will be verified)

 
Good luck!

By |November 4th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post||80 Comments