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Library Providing Services at Home

Library Providing Services at Home

About to celebrate her 90th birthday, Mrs. Jackie Linneman can honestly say she has had a lifelong relationship with the public library system.  An avid reader from a very young age, Jackie fondly recalls her trips to the former location of the public library in Covington.  In fact, the Carnegie Library at 10th and Scott was her first library.

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By |February 6th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post|Tags: , |0 Comments

100 Years Ago, Latonia Jockey Reached Horse Racing’s Pinnacle


On May 27, 1914 a record crowd gathered at the historic Epsom Downs in England for the annual running of the world’s greatest horse race, the English Derby.  The dramatic death of suffragette Emily Davison on the track the year prior and the nearly unprecedented 30 horse field drew a large crowd who knew that quite anything could happen at the annual event.[1]  The tension mounted precipitously at the post line as the horses waited for the starter’s signal.  Matt McGee, an American jockey born and raised in Covington sitting atop of his fine colt Durbar II, stared down the track towards the outside rail and saw the crowd favorite Kennymore growing anxious for the start.  At 9-4 odds, and with Europe’s top jockey and future racing Hall of Famer Frank O’Neill aboard, the horse was thought to be shoo-in for victory, even with the crowded field.   The other rival for the title, Brakespear, owned by none other than the King of England himself, waited patiently close to the inside rail.  The 20 minutes standing at the line must have seemed like an eternity for the horse, however, as he frequently backed away from the starting tape.  The signal to go caught Brakespear off-guard and led to a poor start while the anxious Kennymore took off perpendicular to the rest of the field, racing directly towards the inside rail.

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By |April 11th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on 100 Years Ago, Latonia Jockey Reached Horse Racing’s Pinnacle

7 Last Minute Gift Ideas

It’s December 23rd and you just realized you are missing a gift for your great aunt or maybe it’s your nephew or the neighbor. Our staff got together and came up with a few ideas for the last minute shopper.

1. DIY gifts can be a great money saver and something the gift receiver will truly enjoy. A bag or basket of your favorite cookies, candies or nuts is easy to personalize. You can even dress it up with a final addition of your favorite local coffee or adult brew. Everyone enjoys cuddling up with a good movie or book and a bunch of treats. Sticking with the DIY theme, you can also make an ornament or a card for someone special.

2. I personally love movie night baskets. It can include one or two DVDs, candy and popcorn. You can often find a great old movie for under $10.

3. Books and music are extremely easy to find and can be very inexpensive. We suggest The Mockingjay Part 1 Soundtrack along with a Mockingjay charm or even a new set of The Hunger Games paperback books. You can personalize it by giving your favorite CD or book in hopes of introducing the gift receiver to new music or a new author.

4. A magazine subscription can be a great gift and you can often find online deals like two years for the price of one. Grab a copy of that magazine from the local store to wrap and include a note telling the gift giver they now have a subscription.

5. Chocolates, old fashioned candies, hot chocolate gift pack, coffee gift pack and gourmet food baskets are great last minute gifts too. You can often pick these up at […]

92 Days of Summer

92 Days of Summer Giveaways is back! #92daysofsummer is the length of The Kenton County Public Library Summer Reading Club – June 1-August 31 – and we will be giving prizes away every single day on our Facebook page! Summer can be an exciting adventure but many children get bored quickly. Shoot, even the adults do. So the Kenton County Public Library has you covered with our list of suggested activities and books for #92daysofsummer and giveaways for outings and fun stuff to do at home. This is a long list so print it off to hang on the fridge, mark things on your calendar or check the post often. Also be sure to check the Library Calendar of Events for additional activities.

We will also be giving away prizes EVERY SINGLE DAY of the 92 Days of Summer on our Facebook page so be sure to check it out every day. A coupon for a kid’s meal from Fazoli’s, donated by 4 The Love of Family, will be included with every prize.



Book: The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern
Activity:  Clown around by learning to juggle, balance feathers, ride a unicycle and much more
Giveaway: One week of summer camp at Circus Mojo

Book: Project Kid: 100 Genius Crafts for Family Fun by Amanda Klingoff
Activity:  Get out the craft supplies and see what type of creation you can make as a family
Giveaway:  Two free youth art class at Baker Hunt Art & Cultural Center

Book: 13 Modern Artists Children Should Know by Brad Finger
Activity:  Visit the Contemporary Arts Center
Giveaway:  Two free admission to the Contemporary Arts Center, two CAC T-shirts, four free admission to the June 27 Family Festival

Book: Scooby-Doo! and the Weird Water Park
Activity:  Pack up the sunscreen and head to […]

Baseball and Beer: A Look at the Wiedemann Baseball Club

Summer is almost here and with it comes a lot of baseball and fine beer. After all the two go hand and hand. So lets visit a local baseball team from the past, that was closely related to the beer industry. During the early 1900s baseball was played everywhere and by everybody even women! There were often police ordinances established to prevent youngsters from playing ball in the streets in towns and cities across the area. Many businesses had their own teams, sometimes comprised of employees while others had experienced players on their teams.

Several Breweries in the Northern Kentucky area aside from being in the beer making business also dabbled in the world of baseball. Breweries such as the Bavarian Brewing Company, Heidelberg Brewery and the George Wiedemann Brewing Company all at one point in time fielded baseball clubs. The Wiedemann Club and Heidelberg club played around the same time and even faced each other on several occasions. The most prominent though was the Wiedemann Baseball Club also known as the ‘Brewers’ They were a Semi-Pro team that played baseball in Newport, Kentucky. According to team letterhead from 1909 the club was organized sometime in 1903.


The above letterhead from the August “Garry” Hermann papers obtained from the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Hermann owned the Cincinnati Reds from 1902 to 1927. He also had a stint as the president of the National Baseball Commission. This particular letterhead was part of a note sent to Hermann from Wiedemann manager Arthur Nieman. Notice how the letter head proclaims the club as being leaders in Semi-Professional Baseball.

While researching the club between 1903 and 1907 other than a few game announcements and outcomes not many details […]

Biking in Northern Kentucky

There are many ways to explore beautiful Northern Kentucky and its surrounding areas. One of our favorite ways is to experience it on a bike! Biking groups hit the roads for a day or for weekend adventures. Families can leisurely explore hidden bike paths in our NKY parks. Bike trails sprawl across the countryside and merge into city areas which allow access to everyone making cycling a recreational sport for all! Here are some links to check out before making plans for your next biking excursion! Maybe some will peak your interest and get you back on a bike!


Mountain Biking in Kentucky
The Red Bicycle: The Extraordinary Story of One Ordinary Bicycle
Be Safe on Your Bike
Life is a Wheel : Love, Death, etc., and A Bike Ride Across America
The Bicycling Big Book of cycling for beginners : everything a new cyclist needs to know to gear up and start riding
Bike safety : a crash course
The Bike Lesson
Duck On a Bike

Biking Safety

Local Bike Shops:
Reser Bicycle
Montgomery Cyclery

Bike Rental:
Cincy Red Bike

Road Routes & Trails:
Trail Link
Map My Ride
Cincinnati USA
Licking River Greenway

BG Cycling
Team Cycling and Fitness

“Nothing compares to the simple pleasure of riding a bike.” ~ John F. Kennedy

By |August 19th, 2015|Categories: Featured Post, KCPL||0 Comments

A Book is a Book is a Book

A Wynk, a Blynk, and a Nod to Books  about Books, Libraries, and Reading

Children’s Book Week is an annual celebration of children’s books and the joy of reading. Established in 1919 at the urging of Franklin K. Mathiews, Librarian of the Boy Scouts of America, Children’s Book Week is the longest running national literacy initiative in the country. Its original intent was to focus attention on the need for quality children’s books and the importance of childhood literacy. The need for Children’s Book Week today is as essential as it was in 1919. The celebration is the first full week in May and this year runs from May 4-10. There are lots of great children’s books that are about books, reading, and libraries. This seemed to be the perfect opportunity to showcase those titles, both new and old.


Any Questions? by Marie-Louise Gay

Gay answers the question, “Where does a story start?” She provides information on how a book is made, and her illustrations, full of splotches of color, bits of collage, scribbles, and scratched-out words, make each spread look like a delightfully disordered work in progress.



The Book with No Pictures by B.J. Novak

In this book with no pictures, the reader has to say every silly word, no matter what. This is great kid-friendly comedy, perfect for a crowd or one-on-one sharing!



Books for Me! by Sue Fliess, illus. by Mike Laughead

This third story in the series pays tribute to the many types of books available at the library. The sing-song text and adorable illustrations create a fun story about finding just the right book.



The Boy and the Book by David Michael Slater, illus. by Bob Kolar

In this nearly wordless picture book, a young boy carelessly mishandles a library […]

Bygone Buildings: Covington’s Changing Cityscape

Have you ever driven past an empty lot and wondered what was there before the asphalt and crabgrass? A surface lot, or even a new building in the heart of Covington, was likely erected upon the spot where another building once stood. Covington’s built environment has many intact and preserved buildings dating back as far as the early 1800s, but you might find a photo of a building in Faces and Places that you don’t recognize that was lost to development, fire, or perceived obsolescence. Here are a few examples of buildings of historic and stylistic distinction that once stood in Covington, but are now gone.

Holmes’ Castle is likely the most well-known example of lost architecture in Covington. This palatial home was the second location of Covington Public High School. The high school was originally located on Russell Street, near 12th Street, and was also torn down. Holmes’ Castle was built by Daniel Henry Holmes, a wealthy retailer. It was designed in the Gothic Revival style, which can be identified by its pointed arch windows and church-like details. With its sprawling grounds and lavishly appointed interior, Holmesdale was not D. H. Holmes’ only residence, and in 1915 (seventeen years after his death), his surviving family sold the property to the Covington School Board. The high school was moved into the residence until 1936, when it was razed and a new building constructed in its place. The décor and furnishings that remained were auctioned, and what didn’t sell was unceremoniously burned in the football field.

The Amos Shinkle Mansion is one particularly polarizing example of Gothic Revival architecture that once stood at 165 E. 2nd Street—people seem to either find it grand and exciting, or stuffy […]

Caring for Seniors During the Holidays

With all the hustle and bustle the holiday seasons brings it can become overwhelming quickly and we can easily forget about those who may need extra attention during the holiday season. The holidays can be tough for senior citizens who may not be able to attend holiday parties (due to physical limitations) or travel to see their family (health conditions prevent them from flying or driving for long periods). Holidays can also bring back fond and emotional memories of loved ones passed. These memories can make the holidays tough to get through. You may find that some of your senior friends, neighbors or those you work with moods have changed. During the holiday season it is not uncommon for senior citizens to experience the holiday blues.

With the holidays approaching I cannot help but think of the Homebound patrons the Kenton County Public Library Outreach department serves. Some of our patrons have no family or their family members live out of town. So, what can we do to help our patrons, senior neighbors, grandparents and our senior friends through the holidays? Listed below and some tips on how to cheer up senior citizens during the holiday season.

Sit and chat with them for a while. You might be the only human contact they have throughout the holiday season. Allow them to reminisce about holidays past.
Holiday cards: Send a holiday card to your neighbor, friend or relative who may be alone for the holiday season. Let them know you are thinking about them and you wish the very best holiday season. I can tell you from experience this can really make their day and they will talk about it for months afterwards.
Invite them over for a holiday […]

By |October 14th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post, KCPL, Outreach||0 Comments

Celebrate Your Heritage During Family History Month – October 2014

October is Family History Month, and what better time to celebrate your family’s heritage!

Tracing the heritage of your family can produce so many insights into the struggles and the accomplishments of one’s ancestors – the story of why your family came to live in a certain place, how family members learned a trade, what religious, fraternal or civic organizations your ancestors belonged to, what sort of awards and recognitions your ancestors received, who might be your distant cousins. With the ever-increasing amount of information available in print and online, researching the lives of your predecessors has never been easier – and more complicated at the same time! So, where to begin?

The best way to begin a family history project is to start in the present and work backwards in time – from the known to the unknown. Gather up any family documents, talk to older relatives, and peruse family photographs. Look for birth, marriage, and death information on your family members, as these are the “building blocks” of a family tree. As you work your way backwards in time, also take note of family friends, neighbors and associates. Knowing about them can sometimes provide clues to your own family’s stories.

But what do you do when you finally hit that “brick wall” in your research? What steps can you take to discover more about your ancestors’ lives? To help you with your research and in honor of Family History Month, the Local History and Genealogy department is offering a variety of programs in October to enhance your family heritage sleuthing.

The month begins with a program titled, “Did He Say Regiment, Squadron, Battalion, Destroyer or Attack Transport?” presented by Bill Stolz on Thursday, October 2nd at […]

Celebrating Women of Character, Courage and Commitment

A Wynk, a Blynk, and a Nod to Women’s History Month
Before 1970, women’s history was rarely the subject of serious consideration. However, two significant factors contributed to its emergence as a topic worthy of study. The women’s movement of the sixties caused women to examine their exclusion from traditional American history textbooks. Second, the study of history in general was being transformed, and women’s history was a part of this movement that ultimately transformed the study of history in the United States. History had traditionally meant political history – a study of the key political events and of the leaders, primarily men, who influenced them. However, by the 1970’s, social history began replacing the older style.

Women’s History Month in the United States began as a small-town school event, “Women’s History Week,” in Sonoma County, California in 1978. The week that was selected included March 8, International Women’s Day. In 1981, Senator Orrin Hatch of Utah and Representative Barbara Mikulski of Maryland co-sponsored a joint Congressional resolution proclaiming a national Women’s History Week. In 1987, after much lobbying by the National Women’s History Project (NWHP), Congress expanded the celebration to a full month, and March was declared Women’s History Month. Between 1988 and 1994, Congress passed additional resolutions requesting and authorizing the President to proclaim March of each year as Women’s History Month. Since 1995, U. S. Presidents have issued annual proclamations designating March as Women’s History Month.
The NWHP, founded in 1980, remains a national clearinghouse for multicultural women’s history information. Each year this organization selects a theme that highlights achievements by distinguished women in specific fields, from medicine and the environment to art and politics. The theme for 2014 is “Celebrating Women of Character, […]

Cincinnati Ballet’s Alice (in Wonderland) Giveaway

It’s always tea time in wonderland. Everyone is invited to tea with Alice in wonderland! When guests reach the bottom of the rabbit hole, they should promptly follow the White Rabbit (he’s got a very important date). He will escort them to the tea party, where they will be greeted by various guests. Don’t feel obliged to answer the Mad Hatter when he asks why a raven is like a writing desk (unless you know the answer). Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dum are sure to fly by and the Cheshire Cat is slated to make an appearance, but you never know when he’ll disappear. Guests do not want to offend the Red Queen or they might end up losing their heads!

Friday, February 13 – 8:00 pm
Sunday, February 15 – 1:00 pm

Saturday, February 14 – 2:00 pm
Sunday, February 15 – 5:30 pm

Saturday, February 14 – 8:00 pm

Tickets can be purchased by visiting the Cincinnati Ballet’s website. Tickets range from $32-$100. The Cincinnati Ballet has partnered with the Kenton County Public Library to offer 20% off to Library patrons. Just use the code G1415KenLib to receive the discount.
Giveaway: The Cincinnati Ballet has provided the Library with a voucher for two tickets (date and time of your choice) to Alice (in wonderland) to giveaway to one lucky reader. You have three chances to win. Be sure to do each entry separately for more chances to win. The deadline to enter is Jan. 14 at noon. The winner will be announced on the Library Facebook page and have 24 hours to respond. How to enter:
1. Comment on the blog saying who you would tag with you and why.
2. Tweet this post including @kentonlibrary and comment here that you did.
3. Share on Facebook tagging […]

Cincinnati Ballet’s Peter Pan Flash Ticket Giveaway

For those who never want to grow up, there’s Never Never Land. Luckily, for the Darling family children, Wendy, John and Michael, there’s Peter Pan to guide them through this magical place full of pirates and Indians and Lost Boys. The foursome (with the help of the mischievous Tinkerbell) fly to Never Never Land where the cranky pirate Captain Hook, a hungry crocodile and more adventures await. Follow along on this swashbuckling journey, past the second star to the right and straight on ’til morning, as these classic characters learn what growing up is really all about. The Kenton County Public Library would like to help one lucky winner experience Never Never Land. See the giveaway details below.

Tickets can be bought at the box office or by visiting the Cincinnati Ballet Website.

Friday, November 7 – 8:00 pm

Saturday, November 8 – 2:00 pm

Saturday, November 8 – 8:00 pm

Sunday, November 9 – 2:00 pm

The library has a voucher for two tickets to the performance time of your choice. Library employees and those living in their household cannot enter to win. A winner will be chosen randomly by the end of the day on Wednesday, Nov. 5. The winner will be announced on the Kenton County Public Library’s Facebook page and will have 24 hours to respond to claim the voucher. The voucher must be picked up at one of the Kenton County Public Library locations.

How to enter:

Comment on this post stating why you want to win.
Share this post on Facebook or Twitter and comment here stating that you did. (Entries will be verified)

Good luck!

By |November 4th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post||80 Comments

Classic Book Discussion

Classic Books Discussion Series at Covington

The Classic Book Discussion Series is a new program at the Covington Branch designed to provide readers with the opportunity to discuss books that have proved to be of enduring interest.  This season’s discussions began in September with Sinclair Lewis’ “Main Street” and will continue with one discussion each month, concluding in May with a modern retelling of the ancient story of “The Ramayana” by South Asian author R. K. Narayan. Diversity was an important selection criterion for the books we selected.

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By |January 15th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post|Tags: |0 Comments

Classic Book Discussion Series – Covington Branch

Love the classics?  Join us to discuss “A Christmas Carol”
December 11, at 7 p.m.
Each month the Covington Location of the Kenton County Public Library discusses a classic book.

Copies of this book that is credited with reviving Christmas as a holiday of merriment and festivity may be picked up at
Covington Reference Desk or Drive Thru Window up to 6 weeks before the discussion.

Anyone requiring special accommodations is asked to contact the Library one week in advance of program, (859) 962-4070.


By |November 14th, 2013|Categories: Featured Post||0 Comments

Classic Book Discussion Series – No Exit

Love the classics?  Join us to discuss “No Exit”
Wednesday, January 15, 2014, 7 – 8pm
Each month the Covington Location of the Kenton County Public Library discusses a classic book.

Join us for a discussion of Jean-Paul Sartre’s play” No Exit”, voted the Best Foreign Play in New York in 1946.  The play is considered by many to be Sartre’s best play and most accessible dramatization of his philosophy of existentialism.  Three damned souls, Garcin, Inès, and Estelle are brought to the same room in hell by a mysterious Valet. They had all expected medieval torture devices to punish them for eternity, but instead find a plain furnished room.

Copies of the book may be picked up at the Covington Reference Desk up to six week before the discussion.

Anyone requiring special accommodations is asked to contact the Library one week in advance of program, (859) 962-4070.


By |December 18th, 2013|Categories: Featured Post||0 Comments

Classic Book Discussion Series – The Souls of Black Folk

Kenton County Public Library
Covington Branch
Classic Book Discussion Series
April Title:
W. E. B. Du Bois’s The Souls of Black Folk
Wednesday, April 16, 7p.m.
Copies of  this work in which Du Bois drew on his own experience to create a classic in sociology may be picked up at  the Covington Reference Desk or Drive Thru Window up to 6 weeks before the discussion. Call 859-962-4060 ext. 4241 for more information.



By |March 24th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post||0 Comments

Come to our sewing, reflective, and LED workshops.

Thanks to a generous grant from the Center for Great Neighborhoods in Covington, the library is hosting sewing workshops to help residents increase their safety and engage in creative activities. The project started at Holmes Middle School where students are creating bike messenger bags like this in a 6 week session. The library is also hosting open workshops (anyone can attend!) where three sewing machines, fabric, reflective tape, LEDs, conductive thread, and other supplies are available for residents to create bags, belts, capes, pants protectors, and more.

Get ideas for what you can make on our Instagram and Tumblr accounts for the project:
Upcoming workshops:
Thursday, May 21, 6-8PM
Friday, May 22, 11AM – 1PM
Saturday, May 23, 4-5PM
(More workshops: June 15 and July 14)
Bike Light Parade and Safety Celebration (May 23)
On May 23rd we will have an afternoon and evening celebration for safety and bike month. We have been working with some amazing partners who will provide helmets, lights, and safety training. Throughout the event, we will be giving away free head lights and tail lights (while supplies last) thanks to Queen City Bike and Reser Bicycles.

BRIDGES is a Northern Kentucky Brain Injury Support Group that provides support, education and resources. The acronym of BRIDGES means BRain Injury Demands Guidance Education and Support. BRIDGES provides brain injury awareness education through community outreach and by raising funds to advocate of brain injured survivors and their families. BRIDGES NKY will provide information and free helmets from 2-3PM in Meeting Room 1.

From 3-4PM. Annie Brown from Smitty’s Cyclery will offer advice on riding safe on the roads from what to wear to how to position your bike.  Then from 5-6PM with help from the City of Covington and Park Hills Police Departments she will guide kids through a course to practice their bike skills […]

By |May 12th, 2015|Categories: Featured Post, KCPL||0 Comments

Cooking for Two

While many of the library patrons served by the Outreach department are residents in facilities that provide them with daily meals, not all of them are. Several are retired couples, or individuals who live in their own homes and apartments. They are responsible for their own food choices and preparation and in that respect; they fall into a category of household that is becoming more and more standard these days.
No longer is the large family the norm.  There are many singles and couples, and they all want to feed themselves well.  Statistics back this up, with at present one-third of American families containing only two people. 
-from Not Your Mother’s Slow Cooker Recipes for Two
Whether you’re a retired individual, a young adult moving into your first apartment, a bachelor or bachelorette, a pair of newlyweds, or an empty-nester, you will be faced with the new territory of either cooking for yourself for the first time, or cooking smaller sized meals than you have in the past. During these challenges, it’s dangerously easy to fall into the takeout/pizza delivery trap. Learning how to adjust your skills and cook at home is better in the long run for both your health and your wallet. Plus, you’ll avoid the dreaded, “what do you want?”, “I don’t know, what sounds good to you?” exchange that can go on endlessly and frustrate even the most generally unflappable individuals.

According to research, most people who cook for themselves use and rotate, at most, only a dozen or so recipes…thus everyday meals can become so routine that any mealtime excitement is lost.
-from Not Your Mother’s Slow Cooker Recipes for Two
I can say from personal experience that the statement above is true. While living alone, and even now […]

By |July 31st, 2014|Categories: Featured Post, KCPL, Outreach||0 Comments

Cooking With Kids


The word strikes fear into my heart.  I have to cook it almost every day.  In the most stressful times I will find myself stuck in a cooking rut faced with whiney children.  What’s a parent to do?

Cook with the kids.

It’s a bit counterintuitive because it definitely takes more time than cooking solo. However, when my children are invested in the meal through planning and effort we reap several benefits:

Cooking becomes family time instead of a chore for Mom or Dad.
 The children are excited to eat the dinner they helped prepare
 We tend to eat healthier meals.

Ready to try it out?

Plan: Let your children (if they are old enough) help choose the meal to cook. You can browse cookbooks or websites together or just ask them for their ideas.  In our home, I prompt them to include seasonal fruits and veggies, or let them know ingredients we have on hand. Even letting them choose from a list pre-approved by me makes them feel more invested in the meal.

Prep:  The last thing you want to do when you are cooking with children is fumble around for equipment and ingredients.  An advantage of planning is that it gives me a grocery list.  We go through our recipe together and get out what we need. Even my 8 year old still needs a footstool, and everybody gets an apron.

Read the recipe as you go: When you model reading directions it helps your child’s reading development.  Directional reading requires different reading skills than reading a story.  If your children are reading independently, let them read the recipe to you.

Be safe:  Excited children can forget that stoves are hot and knives are sharp so keep a sharp eye out. For […]

Cooking with the Library Month – Kentucky Inspired Cooking

July is Cooking Month at the Kenton County Public Library and today’s blog focuses on what’s available from the Local History and Genealogy Department in Covington.

Do you know how to make jellied chicken? How about hominy puffs? Have you ever had Bouilli soup? You can find recipes for these and other unusual and delicious regional dishes in our cookbook collection located in the local history and genealogy department.

Many of our books can serve as historical sketches of the region. It’s interesting to see some of the older recipes like one for Kentucky burgout from The Blue Grass Cook Book that calls for “6 squirrels and 6 birds” or what was included in the book’s recipe for a “very fine omelet.” But, while many of our cookbooks are a glimpse into kitchens of the past, there’s no reason you shouldn’t try to make some of these delicious concoctions in your own home.

If you’re looking for a challenge, you might want to try a recipe from The Kentucky Housewife by Lettice Bryan. This compilation uses a paragraph format for each dish instead of the list presentation that is commonly used in today’s cookbooks. It also calls for measurements and techniques that are atypical in today’s modern kitchen, but don’t let that scare you. In fact, we highly recommend the “plain potato soup” on page 24.

Why not give one of the books below a try (or another from our four shelves of cookbooks in the local history department)?

The Blue Grass Cook Book – K 641.5975 F793b
The Kentucky Housewife – K 641.59 B915k
Appalachian Home Cooking – K 641.5975 S682a
The Blue Ribbon Cook Book – K 641.5973 B463b
The Historic Kentucky Kitchen – K 641.5975 S278h
The Delta Queen Cookbook – K 641.5975 N753d
The Kentucky Bourbon Cookbook – K 641.625 S348k

You can also check out our […]

Covington Library Stats & Stories – One Year Later

Covington Library Stats & Stories – Snapshots of the revitalization of Covington Library One Year Later

The Covington Library is one of those unique places. Smack in the center of an urban renewal. It’s one of the few places in Northern Kentucky where you can see people struggling to survive sitting next to a Federal judge. All are welcomed, none are judged. This month marks one year since the Covington Library has been fully operational after a 24 month expansion and renovation. A few questioned the need for expansion; citing books were a thing of the past. That couldn’t be further from the case. Since 2013, the Covington Library has seen a tremendous amount of use and has radically impacted the community and the people it serves.

The following is a brief snapshot on how the Covington Library remains relevant not only by providing books, materials and services, but also by being a critical part of the Northern Kentucky Community.

Stats and stories

The Kenton County Public Library records statistics on the fiscal year, beginning July 1 and ending June 30 of the following calendar year. Here is a look at the statistics for the Covington Library for July 1, 2013 through June 30, 2014:

Circulation of items for adults: 413,076 (up 31%)
Circulation of items for children: 92,461 (up 25%)
Overall circulation of items including books, movies, music , magazines and more: 505,537 (up 29%)
1,618 programs for adults, teens and children were offered including computer classes, book discussions, job skills education, storytimes, literacy enrichment and more. 37,595 people attended these programs.
Volunteers contributed 2,516 hours to the Covington Library, a value of $45,061.56
Staff answered 136,104 reference questions.
From July 1, 2013 to June 30, 2014, 407,516 people visited the Covington Library.

Stories and […]

Covington Walking Tours Available During #92daysofSummer

The Covington Bicentennial is in full swing and the Local History and Genealogy Department is ready with a new FREE walking tour!

Join a member of the Local History and Genealogy Department each Wednesday at 10 a.m. for a tour of the neighborhood around the library. The tour highlights and explores the people who lived in the neighborhoods around the Library 100 years ago in 1915. You’ll learn about Covington’s northern and southern heritage, architecture, and diverse commercial history. We’ll also explore some of the forgotten and lost buildings that once proudly stood in the neighborhood.

The tour is roughly a mile long, and comfortable clothing and shoes are recommended. Large groups, and anyone requiring special accommodations should contact the Local History and Genealogy Department a week in advance of the program at 859-962-4070.

Here is a sneak peak into one of the stories you’ll discover during the tour.

The Lovell-Graziani house at 326 E 2nd Street, formerly 174 E 2nd Street


Benjamin F. Graziani occupied 174 E 2nd Street in 1915. The house dates to the late 1870s, built in French Victorian style by Howell Lewis Lovell, of the tobacco business. Graziani was born in 1858 in Cold Spring, KY, the youngest of nine children to Italian immigrants. His father died in a steamboat explosion when Graziani was only eight years old. He attended Cincinnati Law School and graduated in 1882. In time, Graziani grew to be one of the most prominent attorneys in Covington during the late 19th and early 20th century, often appearing in the newspapers as a “promising young lawyer” at the start of his career. He worked as a criminal attorney, keeping an office building on the second floor of 510 Madison Ave. (formerly where […]

Craig Street Burying Ground: Gone But Not Forgotten

“The cemetery is a memorial and a record. It is not a mere field in which the dead are stowed away unknown; it is a touching and beautiful history, written in family burial photos, in mounded graves, in sculptured and inscribed monuments. It tells the story of the past- not of its institutions, or its wars, or its ideas, but of its individual lives, of its men and women and children, and of its household. It is silent, but eloquent; it is common, but it is unique. We find no such history elsewhere; there are no records in all the wide world in which we can discover so much that is suggestive, so much that is pathetic and impressive.” –Joseph Anderson

Autumn is here, and while we listen close for the things that go bump in the night, there is no better way to spend the bright hours of a crisp fall day than a stroll through a cemetery in the fresh October air. If you missed our Linden Grove Cemetery Tour in September, the cemetery is always open until five for a self-guided experience. While it holds great historical significance, Linden Grove is not the oldest cemetery in Covington. Few remember the town’s first graveyard: The Craig Street Burying Ground.  Now an unassuming plot of land, anchored into the background by the 6th Street underpass and zipped shut by the old C&O Railroad Bridge approach, it was once the final resting place of those first to call Covington home. Let us then relate these distant memories, lest we forget something so dear to those who came before us.

Established in approximately 1815 with the creation of the town, the Craig Street Burying Ground was the […]

December 24 & 25

All locations of the Library will be closed December 24 & 25.  However you can still access great books, video and audiobooks on our site.




Have you used Hoopla?  We have some great suggestions over on our 25 Days of e-Christmas blog.  Hoopla content is always available!  No waiting and no fines!






Looking for a great read?  Many of your favorite authors and hot new titles are over at our ebook site Overdrive.   Can’t decide what to read?  Check out the titles on our Hot Reads blog or A Wynk, A Blynk and a Nod to Books for children’s books.