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Ackerman, Richard H Most Rev. Bishop C.S.Sp., S.T.D.

The seventh Bishop of the Diocese of Covington. Richard H. Ackerman was born on August 30, 1903 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The future bishop graduated from Duquesne University High School in 1920 and in that same year, entered the Duquesne University School of Drama. Feeling a call to the religious life, Ackerman entered the Congregation of the Holy Ghost in 1921 and made his religious profession at Ridgefield, Connecticut on August 15, 1922. He was ordained to the priesthood on August 28, 1926 at St. Mary Seminary, Norwalk, Connecticut by the Most Rev. Maurice F. McAuliffe, Auxiliary Bishop of Hartford. From 1926 to 1940, Ackerman served in the following positions: Master of novices of the Congregation of the Holy Ghost, assistant pastor of St. Benedict the Moor Parish in Pittsburgh, assistant to the national director of the Pontifical Association of the Holy Childhood, assistant professor of Philosophy at St. Mary Seminary in Norwalk, and assistant pastor at St. Mary Parish in Detroit, Michigan. In 1941, he was named director of the Holy Childhood Association, and in 1947 was named the vice president of the association’s superior council. At the time of his silver jubilee of ordination in 1951, Ackerman was presented with the Grand Cross “Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice,” by Pope Pius XII. In 1956, Father Ackerman was appointed the first Auxiliary Bishop of San Diego, California and Titular Bishop of Lares. He was consecrated on May 22, 1956, by Bishop John F. Deardon of Pittsburgh at St. Paul Cathedral. Bishop Ackerman was installed at San Diego on May 23, 1956. He was appointed seventh Bishop of Covington on April 6, 1960 and was installed at the Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption in Covington on […]

By |December 19th, 2013|Categories: History||Comments Off on Ackerman, Richard H Most Rev. Bishop C.S.Sp., S.T.D.

Craig Street Burying Ground: Gone But Not Forgotten

“The cemetery is a memorial and a record. It is not a mere field in which the dead are stowed away unknown; it is a touching and beautiful history, written in family burial photos, in mounded graves, in sculptured and inscribed monuments. It tells the story of the past- not of its institutions, or its wars, or its ideas, but of its individual lives, of its men and women and children, and of its household. It is silent, but eloquent; it is common, but it is unique. We find no such history elsewhere; there are no records in all the wide world in which we can discover so much that is suggestive, so much that is pathetic and impressive.” –Joseph Anderson

Autumn is here, and while we listen close for the things that go bump in the night, there is no better way to spend the bright hours of a crisp fall day than a stroll through a cemetery in the fresh October air. If you missed our Linden Grove Cemetery Tour in September, the cemetery is always open until five for a self-guided experience. While it holds great historical significance, Linden Grove is not the oldest cemetery in Covington. Few remember the town’s first graveyard: The Craig Street Burying Ground.  Now an unassuming plot of land, anchored into the background by the 6th Street underpass and zipped shut by the old C&O Railroad Bridge approach, it was once the final resting place of those first to call Covington home. Let us then relate these distant memories, lest we forget something so dear to those who came before us.

Established in approximately 1815 with the creation of the town, the Craig Street Burying Ground was the […]

Winter Adventurers Part 1: Kate Scudder’s Journals of Traverse in Norway and Russia

For most of us, winter is the time to sit in a blanket by the fireplace, sip a hot drink, and pine for summer. Some, however, embrace the last three months of the year, journeying far and North where the winter never ends. In this two part series, we’ll adventure with Kate Scudder, a voracious traveler, and Emma Lee Orr, a local schoolteacher who braved Alaska, as they boldly pursued the midnight sun. For those of us who can’t (or would rather not) go with these intrepid ladies, they have left behind detailed accounts of their experiences for family and friends who prefer more temperate climes.

Kate Scudder, a popular community figure, is known for her work as a founder of the Baker-Hunt Art and Cultural Centre just a block away on Greenup. She was also an avid tourist, and left florid journals of her travels, which available on the library’s website. She gives detailed information about her journeys, telling her readers everything from the size of the country she’s visiting, to what she knows of its history, down to anecdotes of her experiences at the landmarks she sees. They are, in essence, Lonely Planet Guides by an educated nineteenth century woman, and though she has some strong opinions, it is still fascinating to read.

Most famous are her travel diaries from her 1882 and 1886 expeditions through Europe, which can be read in the Special Collections section of the library website. Lesser known is her journal from her trip to Norway, which might be often dismissed for the Grand Tour of Europe, but she describes it in favorable comparison.

“Small wonder that we were in love with Norway before we put foot on her soil, and […]