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Big Library Read – The Other Einstein

You still have a few days to join the #BigLibraryRead.  The Other Einstein examines the life of Albert Einstein’s first wife, and what role she may have played in his ideas.
Enjoy reading about the lives of women that have influenced of famous men?  Check out some historical fiction:

Loving Frank blends fact and fiction to tell the story of the love affair between Frank Lloyd Wright and Mamah Borthwick Cheney.

The Paris Wife follows the whirlwind relationship of Ernest Hemingway and Hadley Richardson.

Discover Anne Morrow and Charles Lindbergh’s high flying relationship.

 

By |June 23rd, 2017|Categories: Featured Post, KCPL||0 Comments

Historic Pike Street Corridor Walking Tour 2017

Pike Street was once the commercial and transportation heart of the city. It is named for the Lexington Turnpike that connected Covington and the markets of Cincinnati to farmers in the Bluegrass. The original and rustic route followed a historic buffalo trail (the original terminus of the Pike was to the southwest of Linden Grove Cemetery) until it was decided in the mid-1800s that the entire length of the turnpike would be improved to make it passable year-round. Once fully macadamized (a form of gravel paving), the turnpike brought travelers from Lexington up to Georgetown, across the Eagle Hills, over the Dry Ridge, into Northern Kentucky, and finally into the heart of Covington. Later, the railroad brought even more visitors and residents to Covington, who conducted business, shopped, lived, worked, and dined all along Pike Street.

Join us on a tour of historic Pike Street every Wednesday this summer. The tour begins in the Local History and Genealogy Department and features many striking buildings and landmarks for the mile loop. With over 150 years of history, the tour provides information about Covington’s commercial, transportation, brewing, distilling, and architectural history along this essential artery. Points of interest include the former location of the Covington Brewery, the Mutual Building, the Pike Street Arcade, Duveneck Square, the New England Distilling Company, the train station at Russell and Pike, and many more. Keep your eyes open for cool little hints of history, like Stewart Iron Works seals, ghost signs, and other bits of historic character. If you take photos of the tour, be sure to tag them @kentonlibrary and #kcplwalkingtour on Facebook and Instagram!

The tour leaves from the Local History and Genealogy Department at the Covington branch located at 502 Scott Boulevard […]

Free lunches at all Library locations this summer

The Kenton County Public Library has partnered with area school districts and the USDA Summer Food Service program to make sure that children do not go hungry this summer. Children under the age of 18 can go to any of the three Library locations for lunch during specified times. Anyone older than the age of 18 can purchase lunch at a reduced cost. Lunches are available to anyone regardless of income and begin the week of June 5.

According to Feeding America, when kids have empty stomachs, they don’t have the energy to focus, engage, learn and grow. The Library puts an army of effort into encouraging children to keep reading during the summer months so that they can stay on track when they return to school in the fall. Lise Tewes, Children’s Librarian for the Kenton County Public Library, says it makes sense to offer free lunches at the Library.

 

“In the summer months, our message is “read, read, read” but when you are hungry it’s hard to focus.  We do a lot of programs for children in mid-morning so it’s nice that they can go from a program, to picking out books then head over to lunch in one convenient place! We provide the location and the schools provide the food.”

 

While all three Library branches are offering lunches, days and times vary:

Covington Branch Library, Monday-Friday from June 5, 12:30-1 pm
Sponsored by the Covington Public School District
William E. Durr Branch Library, Wednesdays June & July starting June 7, noon-1 pm
Sponsored by the Kenton County School District
Erlanger Branch Library, Monday-Friday from June 5 through July 28, 11:30 am-1 pm
Sponsored by the Erlanger/Elsmere School District Food Service Department

 

The USDA Summer Food Service Program also sponsors […]

By |June 6th, 2017|Categories: KCPL, Uncategorized||0 Comments

DUKE Energy Becomes a Partner in Library’s STEM Efforts

If you have driven by the Erlanger Branch Library recently, you may have wondered what’s going on. Last fall, construction started on three projects at the branch: a makerspace, a large auditorium/meeting room and a separate building to house the administration offices.

On Tuesday, May 15, Duke Energy gave a big boost to this anxiously awaited project. Duke Energy presented the Kenton County Public Library Board of Trustees with a $10,000 grant that will go towards materials and equipment for the new makerspace. Republic Bank was the first sponsor of the makerspace with a donation of $5,000. Schultz Marketing and Communications and The Lawrence Firm, PSC, have also contributed.

 

Many ask “what is a makerspace?”  By definition, it is a place in which people with shared interests, especially in computing or technology, can gather to work on projects while sharing ideas, equipment, and knowledge. The Library provides the space, equipment and materials, and visitors are the makers.

 

The Library’s Executive Director Dave Schroeder explains why this space is so important.  “As we look toward the future, we realize there is great need for a stronger focus to provide STEM and STEAM related activities.  STEAM is an educational approach to learning that uses Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts and Mathematics as access points for guiding student inquiry, dialogue, and critical thinking[1].  However we at the Library have realized that while STEM and STEAM are wonderful movements, there is one critical component being left out – reading.”

 

Schroeder goes on to explain, “Without having a strong comprehension of reading and understanding, how can one be expected to follow directions to build a robot, create fireworks in a jar, or code? Reading is the basis in which both STEM and STEAM flourish.”

 

The […]

Made in Covington: The Aqua-Cycle

Twenty-five year old Phyllis Brawley was installed as a living window display at Cincinnati’s Hotel Sinton on the day of Aquacycle’s debut. Clad in a “beach costume,” the blonde model peddled the newly-patented marine invention that allowed users to propel boats and canoes by foot power.
Spectators congregated around the window in such numbers that Cincinnati patrolman, Charles Ray, ordered that the live window display to cease–a proclamation that was met with jeers. Ultimately, the authorities demanded that manager of the Aquacycle Company, Earl Metcalfe, either stop the demonstration or be cited for interfering with pedestrian traffic. Metcalfe, a self-employed business consultant and manager of the Aquacycle Company of Covington, stated that he intended to defy police orders to meet public demand for the demonstration continue the next day. Arguably, their interest was likely inspired more by the visible shins and shoulders of Miss Brawley than the newfangled contraption upon which she was perched.
Metcalfe, who lived on a farm in Morning View in southern Kenton County, was not the inventor of the Aquacycle, but was assignor to the company when the trademark was registered in 1948. He was involved with the contraption as early as 1947, when the Aquacycle Company of Covington was chartered and valued at an eyebrow-raising $100,000 (over $1,300,000 today). The design for the “pedal or mechanically propelling and steering mechanism for boats” was the work of Dr. Byrel Billman, a physician of physiotherapy and proctology, educated at the Eclectic Medical Institute of Cincinnati. Billman created the Aquacycle as a device to propel and steer boats in places where motorized watercraft were either outlawed or impossible operate. Sportsmen were potential clients of interest, especially those who enjoyed hunting and fishing in marshy areas. Instead […]

Maker Space Coming to Your Library

If you have visited or driven past the Erlanger Branch Library lately, you might be wondering what is being built. There are two projects. One is an administrative center to house Collection Development, Human Resources, Public Relations, Information Technology and the Business Office. The other is an addition to the current facility that will include a meeting room that can hold 450 people and a 1700 square-foot STREAM (Science, Technology, Reading, Education, Art and Math) Center, most commonly known as a maker space. Everything is expected to be completed by January, 2018.

 

The Digicart was a huge success. However, with that success came a demand for a more expansive selection of technology in the Digicart. The Digicart quickly became Digicarts as we expanded our services to include a VHS to DVD conversion service, record to CD conversion service, and a vinyl cutter. While the Digicart was mostly focused on STEM, we still wanted to be sure to include the arts and a love of reading. Thus, the STREAM Center began to take shape.

However, while we will soon have a large space to house all of our maker space materials, we still need to be mobile since we visit local schools. The current Digicart has visited over 1,000 students at five area schools. I see this as an important part of what we do here. We make these materials available to local school teachers because we realize their resources are limited. This allows teachers to give their students more thought provoking interactions in the classroom.

Visiting schools isn’t the only thing I do as an Emerging Technology Programmer though. I do normal library things like help patrons find books and movies. I also get to do a […]

Welcome to Brown Town…Decorating out of the Dark

My family and I just moved into a new house. Initially we thought, “hey, this is the first house we’ve lived in where we don’t have to do anything.” What do they say – famous last words?

 

The house we moved into has good bones. However, despite the large windows, it is so dark inside. The previous owner, though lovely, had a very different decorating style than we do.

We are more “beach chic.” By this I mean we like lighter blues, greens, white, with a pop of color here and there. Pictured below is the same living room as above but with a completely different feel. Ditto with the dining room.

The house we purchased though is about the furthest thing from beach chic. For one, it’s a Tudor. Now I don’t know about you, but I rarely see Tudors on my beach vacations.  The rooms all had dark paint, dark wood windows and dark brown hardwood floors. Knowing our style, a book that caught my eye is Pale & Interesting: Decorating with Whites, Pastels and Neutrals for a Welcoming Home. If you are a fan of either Shabby Chic or HGTV’s Fixer Upper, this book seems to be a blend of those two styles.

 

That being said, we will work with what we have. We have only been in the house since last September. The main focus has to been to paint. Out of curiosity, I searched the phrase “paint your home” on the Library’s card catalog. Nearly 40 titles popped up! Some are new and some are older but all can provide some inspiration.

As of this writing, nearly every room in the house with exception of the kitchen has been repainted. However, I am really […]

Signed, Sealed, Delivered: The Courting of Ginny Hilton

 

Hail February, the month of roses and lace and stamps on Valentine cards; a prime time for a story of Northern Kentucky Love!

Here’s one: Bernard Wright Southgate Jr., son of Bernard Wright Southgate Sr. and Lallie Kennedy, married Virginia D. Hilton on the 17th of September in 1929.

Romantic, I suppose, if a bit dry. One can sit at any of our computers and find that information on Ancestry.com for free, like I just did.

 

However, what Ancestry doesn’t have is much more interesting. Now available on geNKY, the Southgate courtship letters tell a much more relatable tale. Virginia Southgate (at the time, a Hilton) kept all the letters Bernard sent her through their extensive five-year courtship, even as they both attended school and changed residences. Even though we can only hear his half of the conversation, we have a unique look into the fancies and follies between postmarks and biographical milestones.

The first letter is dated the 11th of May, in 1924, from Buffalo, West Virginia, and in it, he writes that he was surprised to receive her letter. It is quite possible (and in fact, likely, from the way he describes her personality in his future notes) that Virginia wrote first.  He does tell us she even illustrated her letters! Unfortunately, we do not possess any of those, though there are a few doodles to be seen at the bottom corner of some pages, like a Tokyo sunrise, and a black cat in a dark cellar at midnight. Bernard is modest about his artistic talents.

Virginia, or, as he refers to her, “Ginny”,  starts out in her family home at 15 Calhoun St., in Cincinnati, which is now a parking lot. Most of his letters are addressed […]

Galentine’s Day at the Library

Attention world, Galentine’s Day is fast approaching! You may have already marked the occasion on your calendar or you may be scratching your chin in confusion at this turn of phrase. For those that have not already embraced this beautiful land mermaid of a holiday let me give you a brief history. 

 

A little show known as “Parks and Recreation” let it be known to all us mere mortals that Galentine’s Day would forever and always be February 13th; otherwise known as the day before Valentine’s Day. Traditionally, the second week of February has been devoted to celebrating romantic love but the glory of Leslie Knope’s creation is that it celebrates the awesomeness of female friendships. Our gal pals are with us all year long. They listen to us complain, they shoulder our tears, they dance it out with us, and they make us laugh harder than is probably healthy. Why haven’t we already been celebrating them!? 

 

 

 

This year you can celebrate with us! The Erlanger Branch Library is having a Galentine’s Day celebration February 7th at 7:00 PM. We’ll be making our BFFs Galentine’s Day cards, watching the two hilarious Galentine Day episodes of Parks and Rec as well as stuffing our faces with waffles at our waffle bar. 

 

 

 

After you hang out with us at Erlanger you can wander over to the Durr Branch on the actual Galentine’s Day, February 13th, for a full day of galentine shenanigans. Starting at 11:00 AM with everyone’s favorite meal: brunch with (you guessed it) waffles! Movies will be playing through the afternoon with an enviable array of crafting choices until 4:30 PM when you’ll be able to paint ceramic dessert plates, followed by an appetizer aficionado’s dream cooking […]

Throwing the Perfect Super Bowl Party

If I asked you what the Super Bowl is about you’d probably answer with one of the following: 1. football, 2. the half time show or 3. the commercials. All of those answers are WRONG! The Super Bowl is about the food. It’s that simple. You must have good food to have a good party. Think chili, wings, nachos, buffalo chicken dip, sandwiches, sliders, meatballs, pizza and mini hot dogs. The greasier the better. We have LOTS of cookbooks you can borrow, as well as magazines you can download from our website for free. They are filled with yummy recipes. But our staff members also have their Super Bowl favorites that we are going to share with you.

“Baked Chicken Wings! The key for me is to bake them on a wire rack in the oven. Toss them in some oil and seasoning beforehand then bake until nice and crispy. I don’t like really saucy wings as they get too soggy, so I lightly toss them in sauce afterwards.” – Seth L., adult programmer at the Durr Branch
Best Spinach Artichoke Dip Ever made with garlic, spinach, artichoke hearts, garlic Alfredo sauce, mozzarella, Parmesan and cream cheese is Durr Branch Teen Librarian Jessy G.’s favorite.
“Keep it simple and classy with popcorn. I also love  good fresh veggies and several flavors of hummus-especially if somebody else cuts up the veggies,” – Julia A., Covington branch manager.
“My favorite was thick, cheesy chili dip.” – Gary P., adult programmer at the Covington Branch
“Boneless wings and nachos.” – Angela P., Erlanger Branch Manager
“Meatballs soaked in mild salsa and apricot jelly in the crock pot all day.” – Gina S., Public Relations Coordinator
“I love loaded […]