kentucky

From the Head of Lettice: Recipes from Historic Kentucky Cookbooks Part One

When looking back on our favorite family memories and holidays, food is often a highlight. Nothing can be quite so nostalgic as Grandma’s cookies or Mom’s best soup. Here at the library, cookbooks are among our most circulated items. For those of you learning to cook or wanting to add some local flair to your home cooked meal, the Local History & Genealogy department has four shelves of cookbooks that you can check out, bring home, and test out. These range from local restaurants’ favorite recipes, to chefs who focus on modern Kentucky cuisine, to historic cookbooks written as early as the 1800s.

In an effort to get to know this section of our collection better, I tried out three recipes from two different books and documented my progress. I decided to focus on dishes with earlier origins. With some of the recipes, or receipts as Lettice Bryan of The Kentucky Housewife (1839) calls them, it took a little creative reimagining in order to modernize the measurements and equipment to something I have in my kitchen. In other words, I opted to bake in a modern oven with set temperatures. I’m also a vegetarian – so, sorry to all you Squirrel Soup lovers, I stuck to finding something I could enjoy!

Let’s get started:

Baked Potatoes, from The Kentucky Housewife (1839) by Lettice Bryan

This recipe is from one of our earliest cookbooks by the thorough Lettice Bryan. The collection contains thousands of recipes along with suggestions of accompanying dishes, for which meal a recipe works best, and other tidbits which give a wonderful glimpse of the time period. I chose this recipe because it is simple, contains few ingredients, but also takes a familiar dish in […]

Spring into Local History and Genealogy

SPRING HAS SPRUNG!!!

Flowers and trees are in bloom, the temperature is warming up, and you may be finding yourself out and about more so than in the past few months. This is the time of year to start planning and planting your garden, maybe visit a farmers market, and take a scenic stroll through your community. We encourage you to visit the Local History & Genealogy department in Covington in your quest for springtime fun; we have a number of fresh, new events on tap this spring that we hope you’ll enjoy!

Can’t make it out of the house this week? Join us on Periscope and we’ll take you with us as we explore Historic Linden Grove Cemetery on our tour Periscope: Hey, what’s that tree? On Friday, April 14 at 3:30PM. Join us live on Periscope (@KentonLibrary on Periscope on your smartphone or tablet, or at periscope.tv/kentonlibrary) for a stroll through the historic Linden Grove cemetery in Covington. We’ll have local guidebooks on hand to help us identify the fresh buds and leaves in bloom.

If you’re itching to get outside, put on your walking shoes and join us for a stroll through historic Covington. Coming up next month is our annual Historic Walking Tour, which happens every Wednesday morning this summer at 10AM, starting on May 3 and ending on September 27. We’ll talk about significant structures, their former residents, and events of times past on this one-hour jaunt down historic Pike Street in Covington.

If you find yourself bored on a rainy day, or perhaps avoiding spring pollen in the great outdoors, join us in the Local History & Genealogy department at the library instead!

Enjoy a display of older and antique dolls from the collection […]

Local Librarian Named as a Mover & Shaker

Ann Schoenenberger of the Kenton County Public Library has been named a “Mover & Shaker” in the library industry by the national publication Library Journal.

In its March 15, 2017 issue, Library Journal named 52 outstanding professionals committed to providing excellent service and shaping the future of libraries. Ann was selected for her commitment to the profession and innovation in working with the community.

 

Ann currently serves as a Digital Librarian for the Kenton County Public Library. As Digital Librarian, Ann oversees the Library’s e-newsletter, the library’s marketing segmentation program and chat services. Ann has also been using innovative technology to engage people who may not otherwise use the library.

 

This year’s class of 52 joins a group of talented professionals who are dedicated, innovative, and passionate about their service to the library and their community.

 

The STEM/STEAM movement, which focuses on science, technology, engineering, (arts), and math, has been steadily working its way through schools and libraries across the nation. From this movement, maker spaces have been developed. A maker space is a place where people of all ages can go to conduct hands-on activities and projects with a variety of traditional tools, such as a sewing machine, or by using more current digital technology such as a 3D printer.

 

Ann has worked to make strong partnerships with local web developers, tech companies and the maker community. She encouraged user groups to use the library and hosted Coder & Maker Club workshops on soldering, Raspberry Pi, Arduino, Python and physical computing. Through the use of Coursera MOOCs and help from tech mentors, she offered a complete 12 week “Beginning Programming” course that evolved into a project-based learning experiment.

 

She has cultivated a relationship with Kenton County Public Schools. She […]

Tips for Using Faces and Places Over the Holidays!

The holidays are a great time to browse through Faces and Places! We have thousands of images of people from the Northern Kentucky area that are just waiting to be recognized and shared. Here are a few tips for using Faces and Places.

1. Share Images Instantly on Social Media

Share images instantly to Facebook, Google +, Pinterest, Tumblr and Twitter! At the bottom of the page for each image, you will see the boxes pictured below. To share click the social media platform of your choice! This saves time, as you don’t have to copy the link or save the image.  

2. Add Comments and Tell Your Story

If you recognize someone, or yourself, add a comment to tell us more of the story behind the image. We love reading your comments and the stories found in images. Just click on the “Add Comment” button!

3. Resize and Save Images Instantly
Take advantage of the picture tabs to view different sizes of an image. Photographs can be viewed as thumbnails, medium, and full size images. You can also view the image as a PDF and save for later!

Donate Your Own Family Photograph Collections
We collect images relating to Northern Kentucky’s people, places, businesses and events. We would be excited to work with you and make your collection available to future generations. Visit our Faces and Places collection to learn more about donating photographs.

Written by: Cierra Earl, Local History and Genealogy Department – Covington

Top 5 Hiking Trails in Northern Kentucky and Cincinnati

The weather has finally changed and the cool temperatures are here at last.  That also means the beautiful changing of leaves and my favorite time to hike.  I greatly enjoy long backpacking hikes but as many people know, it is hard to find the time.  One of my favorite places to hike is the Red River Gorge, but that is about a two hour drive. So I compiled a short list of my top favorite five local hikes that are closer to the Cincinnati area.  If you only have a few hours or a whole day, try to escape to the woods and enjoy the splendor of the fall season.

I hope you find the time to enjoy the splendor of nature in the fall.  It can be quite fleeting.  Dress with layers because it may be cool under those trees.

 

5)  Big Bone Lick Trails:  3380 Beaver Rd. Union, KY.

There are a choice of 5 trails ranging in length and difficulty.  You can also do them all in the 4.5 mile Discovery Trail.  The trails run through woodlands, grasslands, woody savanna, the salt-sulfur springs, and the bison viewing area.

 

 

 

4) Fort Thomas Landmark Tree Trail:  89 Carmel Manor Rd. Fort Thomas, KY 41075

This short loop offers great scenery and views across to Ohio.  It consists of 14 landmark trees and the colorful foliage should be a treat at this time of year.  It is a short 1.1 miles but moderate to difficult due to the few steep hills.  Dogs allowed.

 

 

3)  Devou Park Trail:  460 Deverill St, Ludlow, KY 41016

Devou Park Trail consists of several fun trails.  You can view train tracks right over the trail and know that it should be an interesting hike.  This is […]

The Spanish Flu Pandemic of 1918-1919 in Northern Kentucky

We are creeping into that time of the year again: autumn. Autumn is all kinds of fun: pumpkin-flavored everything, apple cider, trick-or-treating, and a crisp, cool air that we are always pining for following the dog days of summer. Cool weather shoos us inside more often than summer, however, and germs are more easily spread in close proximity to others. Cue flu season, that nasty fact of life that persists from roughly October to March. Ninety-eight years ago this month, the country at large was experiencing one of the most severe outbreaks of flu in its history. Cue the constant hand-washing, and stock up on hand sanitizer, because we are about to venture into a brief, local history of the Spanish Flu Pandemic of 1918-1919.

Influenza comes with a slew of uncomfortable symptoms that we also associate with the common cold, but multiplied in intensity. Influenza can be life threatening to those with comprised immune systems such as the elderly and very young. Between three to five million severe cases of influenza occur each year throughout the world, with death tolls from the flu, or complications from it, ranging from 250,000 to 500,000 worldwide (1). Some years, however, the primary strain of influenza is particularly virulent and panic-inducing: for example, the Swine Flu Pandemic of 2009. The fall of 1918 happened to bring with it one of those flu strains, and was quite possibly the largest outbreak of disease in the 20th century United States.

Panic Ensues

The Public Health Service began requiring states to report cases of flu starting on September 27, 1918, coincidentally the date that influenza is estimated to have arrived in the state of Kentucky (2). The first newspaper reported death from […]

Craig Street Burying Ground: Gone But Not Forgotten

“The cemetery is a memorial and a record. It is not a mere field in which the dead are stowed away unknown; it is a touching and beautiful history, written in family burial photos, in mounded graves, in sculptured and inscribed monuments. It tells the story of the past- not of its institutions, or its wars, or its ideas, but of its individual lives, of its men and women and children, and of its household. It is silent, but eloquent; it is common, but it is unique. We find no such history elsewhere; there are no records in all the wide world in which we can discover so much that is suggestive, so much that is pathetic and impressive.” –Joseph Anderson

Autumn is here, and while we listen close for the things that go bump in the night, there is no better way to spend the bright hours of a crisp fall day than a stroll through a cemetery in the fresh October air. If you missed our Linden Grove Cemetery Tour in September, the cemetery is always open until five for a self-guided experience. While it holds great historical significance, Linden Grove is not the oldest cemetery in Covington. Few remember the town’s first graveyard: The Craig Street Burying Ground.  Now an unassuming plot of land, anchored into the background by the 6th Street underpass and zipped shut by the old C&O Railroad Bridge approach, it was once the final resting place of those first to call Covington home. Let us then relate these distant memories, lest we forget something so dear to those who came before us.

Established in approximately 1815 with the creation of the town, the Craig Street Burying Ground was the […]

Covington Walking Tours Available During #92daysofSummer

The Covington Bicentennial is in full swing and the Local History and Genealogy Department is ready with a new FREE walking tour!

Join a member of the Local History and Genealogy Department each Wednesday at 10 a.m. for a tour of the neighborhood around the library. The tour highlights and explores the people who lived in the neighborhoods around the Library 100 years ago in 1915. You’ll learn about Covington’s northern and southern heritage, architecture, and diverse commercial history. We’ll also explore some of the forgotten and lost buildings that once proudly stood in the neighborhood.

The tour is roughly a mile long, and comfortable clothing and shoes are recommended. Large groups, and anyone requiring special accommodations should contact the Local History and Genealogy Department a week in advance of the program at 859-962-4070.

Here is a sneak peak into one of the stories you’ll discover during the tour.

The Lovell-Graziani house at 326 E 2nd Street, formerly 174 E 2nd Street

 

Benjamin F. Graziani occupied 174 E 2nd Street in 1915. The house dates to the late 1870s, built in French Victorian style by Howell Lewis Lovell, of the tobacco business. Graziani was born in 1858 in Cold Spring, KY, the youngest of nine children to Italian immigrants. His father died in a steamboat explosion when Graziani was only eight years old. He attended Cincinnati Law School and graduated in 1882. In time, Graziani grew to be one of the most prominent attorneys in Covington during the late 19th and early 20th century, often appearing in the newspapers as a “promising young lawyer” at the start of his career. He worked as a criminal attorney, keeping an office building on the second floor of 510 Madison Ave. (formerly where […]

Spooky Stories In Your Own Backyard

Looking to read about ghosts, spirits, phantoms, or unexplained phenomena? Want to read a spooky story about Kentucky or one that originates in your own back yard? Do you think your house may be haunted and want to research its history? Look no further than the Kenton County Public Library. We have numerous local history books and resources filled with haunting tales, ghost stories, and documented unexplained experiences that will give you a good fright just in time for Halloween.

If you’re thirsting for spooky tales from Kentucky, sink your teeth into Ghosts Across Kentucky by William Lynwood Montell or Ghosts, Spirits, and Angels True Tales from Kentucky and Beyond by Thomas Lee Freese. If you have regional supernatural interests, try Haunted Louisville: History and Hauntings from the Derby City by Robert W. Parker or Appalachian Ghost Stories Tales from Bloody Breathitt by Jerry Deaton.

For local hauntings, dare to turn the pages of Cincinnati Ghosts and other Tristate Haunts by Karen Laven, or The Cincinnati Haunted Handbook and Haunted Cincinnati and Southwest Ohio by Jeff Morris and Michael A. Morris. Or, if you don’t find the truth stranger than fiction, A Vampire in Covington by Tim Kelly is a new addition to our Kentucky Fiction collection that incorporates many famous people and locations from Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky.

Also, don’t forget to read or re-read books about the widely-known Northern Kentucky haunting of Bobby Mackey’s Music World. Books in our collection include Haunting Experiences at Bobby Mackey’s by Christel Brooks, and the fictional Hell’s Gate: Terror at Bobby Mackey’s Music World by Douglas Hensley.  We also have copies of the Ghost Adventures television program that investigated Bobby Mackey’s in Season 1 and Season 4. Have you experienced something you can’t explain at Bobby Mackey’s? Creep us out in the comments!

The true story of Pearl Bryan’s murder in Fort Thomas has […]

Adult Kentucky Authors

L. Walker Arnold
Harriette Arnow
Wendell Berry
Elizabeth Bevarly
Martha Griffith Browne
Harry M. Caudill
Marilyn Dungan
Kim Edwards
Ron Elliott
William E. Ellis
John Fox
Ann Gabhart
Janice Holt Giles
Joey Goebel
Sue Grafton
Elizabeth Grayson
Lynn S. Hightower
B.J. Hoff
bell hooks
Silas House
Gayl Jones
Jack Kerley
Barbara Kingsolver
George Ella Lyon
Sharlene MacLaren
Deanna Mascle
Bobbie Ann Mason
Ed McClanahan
Luann McLane
Fern Michaels
Beverle Graves Myers
Sena Jeter Naslund
Elizabeth Oakes
Chris Offutt
Johnny Payne
Betty Layman Receveur
Karen Robards
Gwen Hyman Rubio
Rebeca Seitz
E. Joan Sims
Verna Mae Slone
James Still
Jesse Stuart
Jim Tomlinson
Frank X. Walker
Robert Penn Warren
Jan Watson
Crystal Wilkinson
Deborah Woodworth