Preserve, Enrich, Inspire

Featured Post

Home/Featured Post

Library Providing Services at Home

Library Providing Services at Home About to celebrate her 90th birthday, Mrs. Jackie Linneman can honestly say she has had a lifelong relationship with the public library system.  An avid reader from a very young age, Jackie fondly recalls her trips to the former location of the public library in Covington.  In fact, the Carnegie Library at 10th and Scott was her first library. Continue Reading the Post...  

By |February 6th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post|Tags: , |0 Comments

100 Years Ago, Latonia Jockey Reached Horse Racing’s Pinnacle

  On May 27, 1914 a record crowd gathered at the historic Epsom Downs in England for the annual running of the world’s greatest horse race, the English Derby.  The dramatic death of suffragette Emily Davison on the track the year prior and the nearly unprecedented 30 horse field drew a large crowd who knew that quite anything could happen at the annual event.[1]  The tension mounted precipitously at the post line as the horses waited for the starter’s signal.  Matt McGee, an American jockey born and raised in Covington sitting atop of his fine colt Durbar II, stared down the track towards the outside rail and saw the crowd favorite Kennymore growing anxious for the start.  At 9-4 odds, and with Europe’s top jockey and future racing Hall of Famer Frank O’Neill aboard, the horse was thought to be shoo-in for victory, even with the crowded field.   The other rival for the title, Brakespear, owned by none other than the King of England himself, waited patiently close to the inside rail.  The 20 minutes standing at the line must have seemed like an eternity for the horse, however, as he frequently backed away from the starting tape.  The signal to go caught Brakespear off-guard and led to a poor start while the anxious Kennymore took off perpendicular to the rest of the field, racing directly towards the inside rail. Read the rest of this post

By |April 11th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on 100 Years Ago, Latonia Jockey Reached Horse Racing’s Pinnacle

12 Job Fair Tips

Whether you're attending a job fair at the Kenton County Public Library or another location, there are tips you should follow to get the most out of a career fair. 12 Tips to Get the Most Out of a Job Fair Bring several copies of your resume. If the fair is at the Library, you can arrive early to use the photo copier. Keep in mind others are probably doing the same thing so allow extra time. Dress appropriately. At minimum you should wear business casual but you might want to step it up depending on the organizations that will be at the fair. Have a game plan. Time could be limited so be sure to review the companies that will be present and prioritize the employers you're most interested in. Do your homework. Spend time researching background information on the organizations you are interested in so you can ask specific questions. Only take materials or samples from companies you are interested in. Some employers bring large quantities of print materials or freebies while others will only bring a few. Always ask before taking items. Prepare your "career pitch." Extend your hand, introduce yourself and be ready to talk about your career interests and goals. Be sure to emphasize your skills and experience that would be important to the company. This should be no longer than 30 to 60 seconds. Plan to follow up. Ask for the representative's business card and send a short thank you note to acknowledge them for taking time to speak with you but also so they remember you. Take notes. Personally, I like to write short notes on the back of the business card of the company I'm interested in [...]

By |January 17th, 2018|Categories: Featured Post|0 Comments

13 Reasons to Watch Fuller House

By Gina Stegner I can’t begin to tell you how excited I was to find out Fuller House, basically an extension of Full House, was being made last year. I binge watched the new show on Netflix in two days. When I heard we would find out who D.J. Tanner married, how she became single, what had happened in Kimmy Gibbler’s life, see Stephanie all grown up, hear the jokes about Michelle and see Danny, Uncle Jessy and Joey again I thought… “Have Mercy!” I grew up with Full House, my kids watched reruns. I could relate to the Tanner girls. And now, D.J. is all grown up and a mom just like me. Pretty cool. To make it even better, Fuller House is releasing a second season on Dec. 9 on Netflix. According to TV Guide, D.J. will continue to find herself in a love triangle, Stephanie will find a weird new boyfriend and Kimmy will try to move on from her ex-husband. So why should you watch? The 13 top reasons, in no certain order, to watch the second season of Fuller House on Netflix: Rumor has it that the New Kids on the Block will appear in at least one episode. Candace Cameron Bure (D.J. Tanner) hints that we will learn more about her and Kimmy’s kids this season. D.J. will choose between her high school sweetheart Steve and work romance Matt. D.J.’s ex-boyfriend Nelson, played by someone other than the original Nelson, will make an appearance on the show. We will finally meet Kimmy Gibbler’s brother. D.J.’s ex-best friend Kathy Santoni (also portrayed by a different actor) will make an appearance. We will meet Joey’s wife and kids. Kimmy’s brother is rumored to be Stephanie’s boyfriend (Oh [...]

By |October 26th, 2016|Categories: Featured Post, KCPL|0 Comments

130th Anniversary of the Covington Ladies Home

Old Ladies Home is Real Haven. Kentucky Post, July 11, 1914, page 1 2016 marks the 130th year of operation for the Covington Ladies Home located at 702 Garrard Street in the Licking Riverside Historic District. The organization, originally called the Home for Aged and Indigent Women (still visible in the stone above the main entrance today), was founded in 1886 by Covington resident Ellen B. Dietrick, an early advocate for equality and education for women, with the goal of providing care for women over the age of 60. Today, 130 years later, the mission of the Covington Ladies Home is the same, “to serve senior women, regardless of their economic circumstances, by providing high quality personal care in a community based and homelike environment.” In February 1884, the Ohio River reached a level of 71 feet devastating Covington and surrounding communities. Dietrick, concerned about the plight of many women and families displaced by the flood, joined with other Covington women to form the Women’s Educational and Industrial Union. The Union provided training classes and an employment bureau for women in need. Particularly concerned about women over 60 with no family or financial support, Ellen created the Home for Aged and Indigent Women with the goal of providing care and shelter. The Home became an independent organization in 1887 and was incorporated by the Kentucky General Assembly in March 1888. Ellen Dietrick (1847-1895). Courtesy of the Covington Ladies Home. Ellen Battelle Dietrick was born in Morgantown, Virginia (now West Virginia), to Reverend Gordon Battelle (1814-1862) and Maria L. Tucker (1818-1899) in 1847. Gordon Battelle was a Methodist minister, educator, and delegate to the West Virginia’s Constitutional Convention in 1861. At the outbreak [...]

By |April 29th, 2016|Categories: Featured Post, KCPL|0 Comments

2015 Haunt Your Library Writing Contest Winners

Congratulations to the following children and teens whose stories will be featured as part of the Kenton County Public Library Halloween Writing Contest. Since 2002, hundreds of creative children and teens have entered their creative spooky stories into the contest. This year, over 130 stories were submitted. While all the stories were wonderful, the following have been selected and will be featured in the Community Recorder the week of October 26, 2015: Grades 1-3 First Place Poetry Winner - Halloween Night by James M. - Age 8   Second Place Poetry Winner:   “Halloween’s Coming” by Devin W. - Age 8 Third Place Poetry Winner: “Halloween is Coming!” by Jayla M. - Age 8 First Place Prose Winner - All I Want Is a Pumpkin Pie by Ruth M. - Age 6     Second Place Prose Winner: “The Pumpkin” by Jude H. - Age 8 Third Place Prose Winner: "The Castle" by Eleanor D. - Age 8 Grades 4-6 First Place Poetry Winner - Spooky by Elizabeth M. - Age 12       Second Place Poetry Winner: “In Just One Night” by Kenzie J. - Age 12 Third Place Poetry Winner: “Halloween Party” by Julia G. - Age 10 First Place Prose Winner - Scary Encounter by James T. - Age 10   Second Place Prose Winner: “The Haunted Library” by Madison K. - Age 9 Third Place Prose Winner: “Halloween Night” by Piper L. - Age 9 Grades 7-12 First Place Poetry Winner - The Ground on Which You Stood by Kelsey B. - age 12   First Place Prose Winner - Rumors by Audrey D. - age 12       Second Place Prose Winner: “Forgotten House” by Nicholas C. - age 14 Third Place Prose Winner: “The Halloween” by Natalie F. - age 12

By |October 23rd, 2015|Categories: Featured Post, KCPL, teens, Teens|0 Comments

2017 Haunt Your Library Writing Contest Winners

The Library is pleased to announce the winners of this year’s Halloween writing contest. This was our 15th year in conducting this contest, and we had a record-breaking 303 entries. Over twenty-five area schools were represented, including the homeschool community. We even had an entry from Houston, Texas! It’s interesting to note that we had three sets of siblings win this year: Frances and Ruth Maier, Matilda and Ollie Lukes, and Lillian and Jackson Grothaus. We also had a repeat winner. Ruth Maier won 2nd place last year in the Grades 1-3 Prose Division, and this year she won 1st place. She also won 1st place in 2015. As librarians, we know the importance of reading and developing a child’s reading skills, especially through hands-on, active learning opportunities. Having a child create an original story or poem promotes the advancement of those skills. Several teachers even incorporated this contest into their curriculum, having the entire class submit entries. We are pleased to have this sort of support among the educational community. And the winners for the 2017 “Haunt Your Library” Writing Contest are: Grades 1-3 First Place Poetry Winner: "Stitches" by Frances Maier (Blessed Sacrament School, Grade 2) Second Place Poetry Winner: "Those Noisy Monsters" by Lillian Grothaus (Our Lady of Lourdes Academy, Grade 3)                                                     Third Place Poetry Winner: "Halloween Poem" by Jahlee Etta Reinecke (Cline Elementary, Grade 3)                                                                     [...]

By |October 31st, 2017|Categories: Featured Post|Tags: , |0 Comments

2017 Local History and Genealogy Periscopes

View us online by tuning into @KentonLibrary on Periscope (available on your smartphone or tablet), or at periscope.tv/kentonlibrary  ELI5: Family History In our ELI5: Family History broadcast we answer befuddling questions about doing family history research! January: https://www.periscope.tv/KentonLibrary/1dRKZXLynWrJB February: Why Can’t I find my Grandmother’s Marriage Record in Kenton County? March: What is DPI? Why is it important? Explain it like I’m Five! April: What did Northern Kentucky look like 100 years ago on the eve of World War I? May: Why can't I find my great-great grandmother's death record in 1880? June: Why can't I find my great-great grandmother's death record in 1880? July: How do I read about local history on-the-go? August: How do I find my mom's yearbook photo? September: How do I find what I'm looking for in the microfilm collection? Part 1 How do I find what I'm looking for in the microfilm collection? Part 2 October: How do I find out if anyone has died in my house? November: What is goetta? What's burgoo? What's in a mint julep? What's a hot brown!? December: What is a "Christmas Pickle"? 3G2: Glitter, Glue, and Genealogy, TOO! Glitter, Glue, and Genealogy, TOO! is where we show you how to DIY popular genealogy and family history crafts. January: Learn How To Preserve and Print Cell Phone Photos February: Create Traditional Valentines of the Past March: Women's History Scrapbook Ideas  April: Learn How to use Gel Medium Transfer to Make Family Trees May: DIY EZ Family Reunion T-Shirts June: Grab an Ink Pad and Make a Thumb-Print Family Tree!  July: Create Your Own Family History Zine August: Decoupage Family Tree Project September: Family Tree Peek-A-Boo Game October: DIY Silhouette Portraits November: Family History Recipe Cards December: Family History Family Cards   

By |October 12th, 2017|Categories: Featured Post, History|Tags: |0 Comments

2018 Mary Ann Mongan Literacy Award Winner – John Reynolds

Congratulations to the 2018 Mary Ann Mongan Award:  Jon Reynolds - Kenton County Adult Education   Jon Reynolds, ESL Coordinator for Kenton County Adult Education at Gateway Community & Technical College, has been named as the 2018 recipient of the Kenton County Public Library Foundation’s Mary Ann Mongan Literacy Award. Since 2009, the Mary Ann Mongan Award recognizes an individual or organization that has shown outstanding service in literacy in Kenton County. The award is named after former Kenton County Public Library director Mary Ann Mongan, who served as Library Director for over 40 years. Jon was given the award at a surprise ceremony prior to his Monday night class.   In his role, Jon has and continues to provide opportunities to countless ESL students in Northern Kentucky. In addition to teaching English and literacy skills, he is also responsible for the organization that keeps the grant funded to be able to provide students with free access to classes. Jon also continues to seek and add services for his students. In addition to ESL classes, students may now take citizenship classes, English conversation and the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Additionally, he has given students advice on job hunting, continuing education and helps them navigate their new communities. Jon has impacted countless lives through his work.   “He is tireless in his efforts to continue to support those that may otherwise feel marginalized in their education and career opportunities,” stated nominator Terribeth Smith. “Jon wears many hats and touches countless lives, often without receiving the recognition for his passion and dedication.”    “Jon works so hard to make the lives of so many people rich and more rewarding,” stated Kym Grillot, social studies [...]

By |November 13th, 2018|Categories: Featured Post|0 Comments

31 Days of Local History & Genealogy

What could be better than a pumpkin spice or chai latte every day before Halloween? Thirty-one days of programs during Family History Month brought to you by your local history and genealogy library friends, of course! Starting October 1 we kick off 31 days of programming. That’s right; we are doing at least one program per day ALL MONTH LONG. Grab your rain coat and walking shoes because we couldn’t contain all of the fun to inside the library! We have a host of events that might look familiar, but we’re also hosting events on a whole bunch of fresh, new-to-us topics. We’ll be heading out into our beautiful city to explore and teach you about the iconography of headstones in Historic Linden Grove Cemetery & Arboretum, and have a picnic amongst the cemetery’s residents. If you are sad to see the weekly walking tours of historic Pike Street come to an end, have no fear! We know you like storytelling as much as we do, so we put together a brand new tour filled with spooky, grim, or otherwise unusual stories from the Historic Licking Riverside Neighborhood. Join us on Mondays, October 9 & 30 at 6:00 pm, and Wednesdays, October 4 & 25 at 10:00 am for an hour-long jaunt through the neighborhood with a side of storytelling. As a super special bonus, we’ll be doing another installment of the tour on Saturday, October 21 at 3:30 pm before our annual Evening with the Ancestors event. We’ll also be giving family-friendly tours of Historic Linden Grove Cemetery & Arboretum on Friday, October 13, in case you wanted a little entertainment while waiting for Cinema in the Cemetery to start (presented in partnership with [...]

7 Last Minute Gift Ideas

It's December 23rd and you just realized you are missing a gift for your great aunt or maybe it's your nephew or the neighbor. Our staff got together and came up with a few ideas for the last minute shopper. 1. DIY gifts can be a great money saver and something the gift receiver will truly enjoy. A bag or basket of your favorite cookies, candies or nuts is easy to personalize. You can even dress it up with a final addition of your favorite local coffee or adult brew. Everyone enjoys cuddling up with a good movie or book and a bunch of treats. Sticking with the DIY theme, you can also make an ornament or a card for someone special. 2. I personally love movie night baskets. It can include one or two DVDs, candy and popcorn. You can often find a great old movie for under $10. 3. Books and music are extremely easy to find and can be very inexpensive. We suggest The Mockingjay Part 1 Soundtrack along with a Mockingjay charm or even a new set of The Hunger Games paperback books. You can personalize it by giving your favorite CD or book in hopes of introducing the gift receiver to new music or a new author. 4. A magazine subscription can be a great gift and you can often find online deals like two years for the price of one. Grab a copy of that magazine from the local store to wrap and include a note telling the gift giver they now have a subscription. 5. Chocolates, old fashioned candies, hot chocolate gift pack, coffee gift pack and gourmet food baskets are great last minute gifts too. You can often [...]

8 Spring Break Ideas without Breaking the Bank

Spring Break is next week for most schools in Kenton County. Taking an entire week off work or financing a trip to the beach can be difficult so we have ideas that won't break the bank, or require you to take more than a day or two off work. 1.) The Kenton County Public Library - Schedule time to learn how to use the equipment in the STREAM Center, attend the movie showings each day at the Durr Branch or attend our off-site program at Lincoln Ridge Park Mini Camp:Soils, Mud and Plants. This program will be held Monday and Tuesday, April 9 & 10, at shelter three from 10-noon to explore soils, mud and plants. There will be different activities each day and you will get messy. Be sure to check the calendar of events for other programs like ACT Math Review, Anime Club, Engineering Club, Chess Club and more. You can also come to the library just to check out books, movies and games. Don't forget to take a look at our Library of Things for unique items you can borrow! 2.) The National Museum of the US Air Force - This museum is free and only an hour drive from Northern Kentucky. It is the oldest and largest military aviation museum in the world. It is located on Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio. Visitors can actually climb aboard some of the planes, see lots of memorabilia and try out the flight simulators.   3.) Booneshoft Museum of Discovery - Admission is between $11.50 and $14.50 at this interactive science museum in Dayton, Ohio. The kids will have hours of fun with the science on a sphere, the tree house, tidal pool and discovery zoo exhibits.  4.) COSI [...]

By |April 5th, 2018|Categories: Featured Post|0 Comments

87 Years of Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky History Added to Kenton County Public Library Database

The Historical Cincinnati Enquirer Database now covers 1841-2009. The expanded date range offers 87 more years of Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky news coverage. The database contains digitized scans of the Cincinnati Enquirer, viewable in PDF format. The database is keyword searchable and also searchable by a specific date or page number. Articles can be saved to your computer or printed. Patrons can access the database at any branch of the Kenton County Public Library and at home with their Kenton County Public Library card. If you are looking for something in the Kentucky Post, Kentucky Times-Star, or other Northern Kentucky newspapers, the Northern Kentucky Newspaper Index contains indexed entries to these newspapers. You can view the Kentucky Post and Kentucky Times-Star on microfilm, in the Local history and Genealogy Department at the Covington branch. The Local History and Genealogy Department is located on the upper level of the building. Reach us at (859)962-4070 or history@kentonlibrary.org if you have questions about researching the database. Cierra Earl, MA, Local History and Genealogy Programmer, Covington branch

By |January 12th, 2017|Categories: Featured Post, History, KCPL|0 Comments

92 Days of Summer

92 Days of Summer Giveaways is back! #92days of summer is the length of the Kenton County Public Library Summer Reading Club – June 1-August 31 – and we will be giving prizes away every single day on our Facebook page! Summer can be an exciting adventure but many children get bored quickly. Shoot, even the adults do. So the Kenton County Public Library has you covered with our list of suggested activities and books for #92daysofsummer and giveaways for outings and fun stuff to do at home. This is a long list so print it off to hang on the fridge, mark things on your calendar or check the post often. Also be sure to check the Library Calendar of Events for additional activities. We will also be giving away prizes EVERY SINGLE DAY of the 92 Days of Summer on our Facebook page so be sure to check it out every day. In addition to the prize listed for each day, we will give away a Reis Promotions tote bag and a free one-year subscription to Kentucky Monthly every single day. #92daysofsummer Book:  Rules of Summer Activity:  Ice Cream Social Giveaway:  Ice Cream Social Prize Pack Book:  Silly Circus Tricks Activity:  Sign up for camp at Circus Mojo Giveaway:  Free Week of Summer Camp at Circus Mojo (Valid: Week of June 6) Book:  Cincinnati Reds Legends Activity:  Take in a baseball game Giveaway:  Cincinnati Reds Ticket Vouchers Book:  Wonder Woman At Super Hero High                                                                                                                [...]

92 Days of Summer

92 Days of Summer Giveaways is back! #92days of summer is the length of the Kenton County Public Library Summer Reading Club – June 1-August 31 – and we will be giving prizes away every single day on our Facebook page! Summer can be an exciting adventure but many children get bored quickly. Shoot, even the adults do. So the Kenton County Public Library has you covered with our list of suggested activities and books for #92daysofsummer and giveaways for outings and fun stuff to do at home. This is a long list so print it off to hang on the fridge, mark things on your calendar or check the post often. Also be sure to check the Library Calendar of Events for additional activities. We will also be giving away prizes EVERY SINGLE DAY of the 92 Days of Summer on our Facebook page so be sure to check it out every day. In addition to the prize listed for each day, we will give away a Reis Promotions tote bag and a free one-year subscription to Kentucky Monthly every single day. #92daysofsummer Book:  Rules of Summer Activity:  Ice Cream Social Giveaway:  Ice Cream Social Prize Pack Book:  Silly Circus Tricks Activity:  Sign up for camp at Circus Mojo Giveaway:  Free Week of Summer Camp at Circus Mojo (Valid: Week of June 6) Book:  Cincinnati Reds Legends Activity:  Take in a baseball game Giveaway:  Cincinnati Reds Ticket Vouchers Book:  Wonder Woman At Super Hero High                                                                                                                [...]

By |April 20th, 2016|Categories: Featured Post|0 Comments

92 Days of Summer

92 Days of Summer Giveaways is back! #92daysofsummer is the length of The Kenton County Public Library Summer Reading Club – June 1-August 31 – and we will be giving prizes away every single day on our Facebook page! Summer can be an exciting adventure but many children get bored quickly. Shoot, even the adults do. So the Kenton County Public Library has you covered with our list of suggested activities and books for #92daysofsummer and giveaways for outings and fun stuff to do at home. This is a long list so print it off to hang on the fridge, mark things on your calendar or check the post often. Also be sure to check the Library Calendar of Events for additional activities. We will also be giving away prizes EVERY SINGLE DAY of the 92 Days of Summer on our Facebook page so be sure to check it out every day. A coupon for a kid’s meal from Fazoli’s, donated by 4 The Love of Family, will be included with every prize.   #92daysofsummer Book: The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern Activity:  Clown around by learning to juggle, balance feathers, ride a unicycle and much more Giveaway: One week of summer camp at Circus Mojo Book: Project Kid: 100 Genius Crafts for Family Fun by Amanda Klingoff Activity:  Get out the craft supplies and see what type of creation you can make as a family Giveaway:  Two free youth art class at Baker Hunt Art & Cultural Center Book: 13 Modern Artists Children Should Know by Brad Finger Activity:  Visit the Contemporary Arts Center Giveaway:  Two free admission to the Contemporary Arts Center, two CAC T-shirts, four free admission to the June 27 Family Festival Book: Scooby-Doo! and the Weird Water [...]

Anti-German Hysteria in Greater Cincinnati

Newspaper article found on microfilm in the Local History and Genealogy Department at Covington. Appeared in the Kentucky Post on September 25th, 1918 on page 1. My ancestor, Louis Lang, then going by the name Ludwig, emigrated from his home in Alsace-Lorraine in 1895 when he was 15 years old. On the passenger list for the ship traveling from Antwerp, Belgium to New York City, his family listed that they were headed directly for Cynthiana, Kentucky, where Louis’s eldest brother was a farmer. Louis lived a normal life: he got married and had two daughters, subsequently divorced his wife, and spent the rest of his life as a farming bachelor before dying at the age of 47. This all seems pretty straightforward, but Louis caused some confusion for me when I started to research him I first read Louis’s name when I found my great-grandmother, at the age of 14 months, with her family on the 1910 census. It was there that I saw Louis was listed as a naturalized American, born in Germany. Since both of his parents were listed as also being born in Germany, I simply assumed that that side of my family was German. But, I noticed on the 1920 census that my great-great-grandfather Louis was no longer claiming his German heritage. This time around, he listed his birthplace as France despite his native tongue still being listed as German. The 1920 census also listed Louis’s parents as being French instead of the previously stated German. Some may argue that the reason Louis changed his country of origin was due to Alsace-Lorraine reverting from German back to French terrain. After all, in 1870, only ten years before the Langs [...]

April Showers Bring May Flowers

 A Wynk, a Blynk, and a Nod to Books about Flowers, Gardening, and Things that Grow   Did you know that this familiar rhyme was originally a poem written by Karen Chappell? We thought it might be fun to include the first stanza of this poem as an introduction to the many new and colorful books about flowers and gardening that can be found at your library. Enjoy! April showers bring May flowers, That is what they say. But if all the showers turned to flowers, We’d have quite a colourful day! New Picture Books Bee: A Peek-Through Picture Book by Britta Teckentrup This book provides children with a very simple explanation of the important job bees have of pollinating flowers. The mixed media illustrations include a die-cut with a bee at the center. The die-cut gets progressively smaller as the story unfolds. This is a very colorful and engaging picture book.     The Best-Ever Step-By-Step Kid’s First Gardening: Fantastic Gardening Ideas for 5 to 12 Year-Olds, from Growing Fruit and Vegetables and Fun with Flowers to Wildlife Gardening and Outdoor Crafts by Jenny Hendy Winner of the Practical Gardening Book of the Year, with 120 fun projects for kids.     The Butterfly Garden by Laura Weston This lift-the-flap board book presents the life cycle of the monarch butterfly. The illustrations are done in black and white, but the flaps reveal pops of color. Simple language explains the transformation.     Caterpillar Dreams by Clive McFarland Henri the caterpillar sets off on a great adventure beyond the walls of his garden, but in the end discovers there’s no place like home.       Fantastic Flowers by Susan Stockdale This book includes a [...]

Arjay to Zag: a Brief Collection of Strange Kentucky Places

While doing your family research you might come across some towns you have never heard of. But have you ever really given any thought to where the names of towns come from? In modern times, town names come about when a post office is established. As such, it was often the post master, or someone close to them, that submitted town names to the Post Office Department. Here are 26 towns (one for each letter of the alphabet) in Kentucky with unusual names and their origins. These are certainly not the only unusual towns in the state, but a small selection. What strange town names have you come across in your research? Arjay (Bell County): A coal town located along KY 66, 3 miles north east of Pineville. The name was created from the initials of coal operator R.J. Asher. The post office was established on Feb. 23, 1911. Bachelors Rest (Pendleton County): 5 miles east south east of Falmouth is Bachelors Rest, so named because of the bachelors that spent time sunning themselves in front of the local store. The post office was established in 1870 (as “Batchelors Rest”) but renamed Mains in 1887 after Sarah Mains became the post master. The post office was closed in 1903 Canoe (Breathitt County): Named for the nearby Canoe Creek, this post office, 7.5 miles south by southwest of Jackson was named Canoe Fork on Aug. 14, 1891. It lost “Fork” becoming the simpler “Canoe” in 1894. Story of the creek’s name says that the creek waters got so low that a person’s canoe couldn’t be floated out and was abandoned there. Democrat (Letcher County): Located on KY 7, 8 miles north of Whitesburg, this settlement was [...]

By |January 12th, 2017|Categories: Featured Post|0 Comments

Astronomy at the Library

What are you doing on August 21, 2017? On that date, there will be a Total Solar Eclipse visible in the United States… the first one since 1979! While we are not on the path of totality in Northern Kentucky, meaning the entire sun will not be blocked by the moon‘s shadow in our line of sight; we will be able to see about 90% of the sun covered! This will be the most exciting astronomical event in the US for quite some time, and I am very excited to share not just the solar eclipse, but space in general!   In February, there was a Penumbral Lunar Eclipse, meaning that we were seeing the edges of the earth’s shadow on the moon. In order to share the experience with as many people as possible, I held a Lunar Eclipse program that evening at the Erlanger Branch. 75 people of a wide range of ages attended to learn about the eclipse, build some models of how eclipses work, and practice “becoming” eclipses themselves. We also took the library’s 8” Dobsonian Reflector telescope out on the front sidewalk to look at the moon during the eclipse. Since it was a Penumbral Eclipse and not a total Lunar Eclipse, it wasn’t a spectacular event, but the view of the moon that night was very good regardless! During the program, families created models, then used flashlights to simulate the sun’s light. If you did not make it to the Lunar Eclipse program, there are many other opportunities for you to experience the wonders of space at KCPL. I frequently hold children’s and all-ages programs related to astronomy and space. In fact, On April 13, at 7:00 pm, I will [...]

Audiobooks — Just Added to Hoopla

  What Remains of Her - Eric Rickstad From the New York Times bestselling author of The Silent Girls comes this chilling, harrowing thriller set in rural Vermont about a recluse who believes the young girl he's found in the woods is the reincarnation of his missing daughter, returned to help him solve her and his wife's disappearance.   If You Leave Me - Crystal Hana Kim An emotionally riveting debut novel about war, family, and forbidden love-the unforgettable saga of two ill-fated lovers in Korea and the heartbreaking choices they're forced to make in the years surrounding the civil war that still haunts us today.   Captain Underpants - Dav Pilkey The second book in Dav Pilkey's mega-bestselling Captain Underpants series, now available in Sound-O-Rama!   Keys to My Cuffs - Lani Lynn Vale Part 4 of the Heroes of The Dixie Wardens MC series   Auschwitz Lullaby by Mario Escobar In 1943 Germany, Helene is just about to wake up her children to go to school when a group of policemen break into her house. The policemen want to haul away her gypsy husband and their five children. The police tell Helene that as a German she does not have to go with them, but she decides to share the fate of her family.

By |August 14th, 2018|Categories: Featured Post|0 Comments

Audiobooks for Your Spring Break Road Trip

A stunning debut novel--a chilling and unexpected portrait of a female friendship set in 1950's Morocco. This is Patricia Highsmith for the 21st century.  Optioned for film by George Clooney's Smokehouse Pictures, with Scarlett Johansson to star. Lives of four misfits are intertwined when a bully's prank lands shy Virgil at the bottom of a well and Valencia, Kaori, and Gen band together in an epic quest to find and rescue him. While Jacobia "Jake" Tiptree has moved on from fixing up houses, she still can't resist the urge to snoop into the occasional murder. Something sinister is brewing in the kitchen of The Chocolate Moose - retired health inspector Alan Blake is found murdered. Jake's best friend Ellie never made a secret of her distaste for Alan. Now, with no alibi for the night of the murder, she's in a sticky situation with the police - and it's up to Jake to catch the real killer and keep Ellie living in the land of the free. Nikki has spent most of her life distancing herself from the traditional Sikh community. After her father's death she takes a job teaching a creative writing course in the heart of the Punjabi community. When one of the women students brings a book of erotica to class, Nicki use it as the basis for helping these modest women unleash creativity by telling their own stories. At a moment of crisis over our national identity, journalist Dan Rather reflects on what it means to be an American. He reminds us of the principles upon which the United States was founded.

By |March 30th, 2018|Categories: Featured Post|0 Comments

Baseball and Beer: A Look at the Wiedemann Baseball Club

Summer is almost here and with it comes a lot of baseball and fine beer. After all the two go hand and hand. So lets visit a local baseball team from the past, that was closely related to the beer industry. During the early 1900s baseball was played everywhere and by everybody even women! There were often police ordinances established to prevent youngsters from playing ball in the streets in towns and cities across the area. Many businesses had their own teams, sometimes comprised of employees while others had experienced players on their teams. Several Breweries in the Northern Kentucky area aside from being in the beer making business also dabbled in the world of baseball. Breweries such as the Bavarian Brewing Company, Heidelberg Brewery and the George Wiedemann Brewing Company all at one point in time fielded baseball clubs. The Wiedemann Club and Heidelberg club played around the same time and even faced each other on several occasions. The most prominent though was the Wiedemann Baseball Club also known as the ‘Brewers’ They were a Semi-Pro team that played baseball in Newport, Kentucky. According to team letterhead from 1909 the club was organized sometime in 1903. Photograph Courtesy of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum @ www.baseballhall.org   The above letterhead from the August “Garry” Hermann papers obtained from the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Hermann owned the Cincinnati Reds from 1902 to 1927. He also had a stint as the president of the National Baseball Commission. This particular letterhead was part of a note sent to Hermann from Wiedemann manager Arthur Nieman. Notice how the letter head proclaims the club as being leaders in Semi-Professional Baseball. While [...]