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Check Out These Oscar Winners

The Oscars took place last night with Leonardo DiCaprio finally winning his first Oscar for The Revenant. This was DiCaprio’s sixth nomination but his first win. The following movies were nominated for best picture: The Big Short Bridge of Spies Brooklyn Mad Max: Fury Road The Martian The Revenant Room Spotlight   - best picture Inside Out - best animated feature film You can click on the movie title to be put the item on hold at the Kenton County Public Library. What was your favorite movie of 2015? Were you excited to see DiCaprio finally take home a win?

By |February 29th, 2016|Categories: Featured Post, KCPL|0 Comments

Children’s Books Celebrating African American History Month That Will Inspire You

             “Because of Them, We Can …” Celebrating African American History Month    Our nation’s celebration of black history was expanded to a full month in 1976, the year of our nation's bicentennial. At President Gerald R. Ford’s urging, Americans were encouraged to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.” In February, 1976, fifty years after the first black history celebration, the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History held the first African American History Month. By this time, the entire nation had come to recognize the importance of African American history in the drama of the American story. Each year, many children’s books that focus on African American history are published. February is the perfect time to introduce those titles! New Picture Books The First Step: How One Girl Put Segregation on Trial by Susan E. Goodman, illus. by E.B. Lewis In 1847 four year old Sarah Roberts was removed from her all white school in Boston and told she could not return. Her parents fought back, and though they lost the case in court, their actions set in motion the events which led to Boston voluntarily integrating its schools in 1855. Lewis’s illustrations effectively capture the historical era and mood of the times.   Freedom in Congo Square by Carole Boston Weatherford, illus. by R. Gregory Christie Slaves in New Orleans, Louisiana were allowed to congregate on Sundays in Congo Square to make music, sing and dance. The poetic text and folk-art style illustrations combine to pay homage to this bit of African American history.     Freedom over Me: Eleven Slaves, Their Lives [...]

Choosing a College

You may remember a post I wrote last fall called How to Prep for Your Child's Senior Year. Well, my daughter Andi's senior year will come to an end in two months. We definitely weren't as prepared as I would have liked to have been but I am much more prepared for my son Joey, who is only a freshman. After college visits, tons of research and lots of tears, Andi has chosen a college and a major. Over the last two years, we have toured Illinois State University, Georgia State University, Thomas More College and Northern Kentucky University. We didn't really consider cost when choosing which schools to tour, knowing that she would receive some merit money and hopefully receive other scholarships. Thomas More and Northern Kentucky University were obvious choices because of location. ISU and GSU were picked based on her interests. Thomas More College Thomas More offers a beautiful campus and although it is private, it can be very affordable. The school is able to offer a lot of scholarships, which actually brought the tuition down to about the cost of NKU. Andi wasn't sure what her major would be when we toured but TMC does not offer what she ultimately chose. However, she ruled TMC out before even picking a major. Thomas More has about 1300 students, which isn't much bigger than Andi's high school. She wants something larger than that. Andi & Joey visiting ISU Illinois State University ISU was our first college visit. We actually chose ISU because they offer a recreational circus program that Joey is interested in. You can read about this visit here. Andi really didn't consider ISU but it was good to have [...]

Cincinnati Ballet’s Alice (in Wonderland) Giveaway

  It's always tea time in wonderland. Everyone is invited to tea with Alice in wonderland! When guests reach the bottom of the rabbit hole, they should promptly follow the White Rabbit (he's got a very important date). He will escort them to the tea party, where they will be greeted by various guests. Don't feel obliged to answer the Mad Hatter when he asks why a raven is like a writing desk (unless you know the answer). Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dum are sure to fly by and the Cheshire Cat is slated to make an appearance, but you never know when he'll disappear. Guests do not want to offend the Red Queen or they might end up losing their heads! PERFORMANCE DATES AND TIMES Friday, February 13 - 8:00 pm Sunday, February 15 - 1:00 pm Saturday, February 14 - 2:00 pm Sunday, February 15 - 5:30 pm Saturday, February 14 - 8:00 pm Tickets can be purchased by visiting the Cincinnati Ballet's website. Tickets range from $32-$100. The Cincinnati Ballet has partnered with the Kenton County Public Library to offer 20% off to Library patrons. Just use the code G1415KenLib to receive the discount. Giveaway: The Cincinnati Ballet has provided the Library with a voucher for two tickets (date and time of your choice) to Alice (in wonderland) to giveaway to one lucky reader. You have three chances to win. Be sure to do each entry separately for more chances to win. The deadline to enter is Jan. 14 at noon. The winner will be announced on the Library Facebook page and have 24 hours to respond. How to enter: 1. Comment on the blog saying who you would tag with you and why. 2. Tweet this post including @kentonlibrary [...]

Cincinnati Ballet’s Peter Pan Flash Ticket Giveaway

For those who never want to grow up, there's Never Never Land. Luckily, for the Darling family children, Wendy, John and Michael, there's Peter Pan to guide them through this magical place full of pirates and Indians and Lost Boys. The foursome (with the help of the mischievous Tinkerbell) fly to Never Never Land where the cranky pirate Captain Hook, a hungry crocodile and more adventures await. Follow along on this swashbuckling journey, past the second star to the right and straight on 'til morning, as these classic characters learn what growing up is really all about. The Kenton County Public Library would like to help one lucky winner experience Never Never Land. See the giveaway details below.   Tickets can be bought at the box office or by visiting the Cincinnati Ballet Website.   Friday, November 7 - 8:00 pm Saturday, November 8 - 2:00 pm Saturday, November 8 - 8:00 pm Sunday, November 9 - 2:00 pm   Giveaway The library has a voucher for two tickets to the performance time of your choice. Library employees and those living in their household cannot enter to win. A winner will be chosen randomly by the end of the day on Wednesday, Nov. 5. The winner will be announced on the Kenton County Public Library's Facebook page and will have 24 hours to respond to claim the voucher. The voucher must be picked up at one of the Kenton County Public Library locations. How to enter: Comment on this post stating why you want to win. Share this post on Facebook or Twitter and comment here stating that you did. (Entries will be verified)   Good luck!

By |November 4th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post|80 Comments

Classic Book Discussion

Classic Books Discussion Series at Covington The Classic Book Discussion Series is a new program at the Covington Branch designed to provide readers with the opportunity to discuss books that have proved to be of enduring interest.  This season’s discussions began in September with Sinclair Lewis’ “Main Street” and will continue with one discussion each month, concluding in May with a modern retelling of the ancient story of “The Ramayana” by South Asian author R. K. Narayan. Diversity was an important selection criterion for the books we selected. Continue Reading the Post  

By |January 15th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post|Tags: |0 Comments

Classic Book Discussion Series – Covington Branch

Love the classics?  Join us to discuss "A Christmas Carol" December 11, at 7 p.m. Each month the Covington Location of the Kenton County Public Library discusses a classic book. Copies of this book that is credited with reviving Christmas as a holiday of merriment and festivity may be picked up at Covington Reference Desk or Drive Thru Window up to 6 weeks before the discussion. Anyone requiring special accommodations is asked to contact the Library one week in advance of program, (859) 962-4070.       [/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

By |November 14th, 2013|Categories: Featured Post|0 Comments

Classic Book Discussion Series – No Exit

Love the classics?  Join us to discuss "No Exit" Wednesday, January 15, 2014, 7 – 8pm Each month the Covington Location of the Kenton County Public Library discusses a classic book. Join us for a discussion of Jean-Paul Sartre’s play” No Exit”, voted the Best Foreign Play in New York in 1946.  The play is considered by many to be Sartre’s best play and most accessible dramatization of his philosophy of existentialism.  Three damned souls, Garcin, Inès, and Estelle are brought to the same room in hell by a mysterious Valet. They had all expected medieval torture devices to punish them for eternity, but instead find a plain furnished room. Copies of the book may be picked up at the Covington Reference Desk up to six week before the discussion. Anyone requiring special accommodations is asked to contact the Library one week in advance of program, (859) 962-4070.       [/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

By |December 18th, 2013|Categories: Featured Post|0 Comments

Classic Book Discussion Series – The Souls of Black Folk

Kenton County Public Library Covington Branch Classic Book Discussion Series April Title: W. E. B. Du Bois’s The Souls of Black Folk Wednesday, April 16, 7p.m. Copies of  this work in which Du Bois drew on his own experience to create a classic in sociology may be picked up at  the Covington Reference Desk or Drive Thru Window up to 6 weeks before the discussion. Call 859-962-4060 ext. 4241 for more information.    

By |March 24th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post|0 Comments

Come to our sewing, reflective, and LED workshops.

Thanks to a generous grant from the Center for Great Neighborhoods in Covington, the library is hosting sewing workshops to help residents increase their safety and engage in creative activities. The project started at Holmes Middle School where students are creating bike messenger bags like this in a 6 week session. The library is also hosting open workshops (anyone can attend!) where three sewing machines, fabric, reflective tape, LEDs, conductive thread, and other supplies are available for residents to create bags, belts, capes, pants protectors, and more. Get ideas for what you can make on our Instagram and Tumblr accounts for the project: http://bvisiblecov.tumblr.com/ https://instagram.com/bvisiblecov/ Upcoming workshops: Thursday, May 21, 6-8PM Friday, May 22, 11AM - 1PM Saturday, May 23, 4-5PM (More workshops: June 15 and July 14) Bike Light Parade and Safety Celebration (May 23) On May 23rd we will have an afternoon and evening celebration for safety and bike month. We have been working with some amazing partners who will provide helmets, lights, and safety training. Throughout the event, we will be giving away free head lights and tail lights (while supplies last) thanks to Queen City Bike and Reser Bicycles. BRIDGES is a Northern Kentucky Brain Injury Support Group that provides support, education and resources. The acronym of BRIDGES means BRain Injury Demands Guidance Education and Support. BRIDGES provides brain injury awareness education through community outreach and by raising funds to advocate of brain injured survivors and their families. BRIDGES NKY will provide information and free helmets from 2-3PM in Meeting Room 1. From 3-4PM. Annie Brown from Smitty's Cyclery will offer advice on riding safe on the roads from what to wear to how to position your bike.  Then from 5-6PM with help from the City of Covington and Park Hills Police Departments she will guide [...]

By |May 12th, 2015|Categories: Featured Post, KCPL|0 Comments

Cooking for Two

While many of the library patrons served by the Outreach department are residents in facilities that provide them with daily meals, not all of them are. Several are retired couples, or individuals who live in their own homes and apartments. They are responsible for their own food choices and preparation and in that respect; they fall into a category of household that is becoming more and more standard these days. No longer is the large family the norm.  There are many singles and couples, and they all want to feed themselves well.  Statistics back this up, with at present one-third of American families containing only two people.  -from Not Your Mother’s Slow Cooker Recipes for Two Whether you’re a retired individual, a young adult moving into your first apartment, a bachelor or bachelorette, a pair of newlyweds, or an empty-nester, you will be faced with the new territory of either cooking for yourself for the first time, or cooking smaller sized meals than you have in the past. During these challenges, it’s dangerously easy to fall into the takeout/pizza delivery trap. Learning how to adjust your skills and cook at home is better in the long run for both your health and your wallet. Plus, you’ll avoid the dreaded, “what do you want?”, “I don’t know, what sounds good to you?” exchange that can go on endlessly and frustrate even the most generally unflappable individuals. According to research, most people who cook for themselves use and rotate, at most, only a dozen or so recipes…thus everyday meals can become so routine that any mealtime excitement is lost. -from Not Your Mother’s Slow Cooker Recipes for Two I can say from personal experience that the statement above is true. While [...]

By |July 31st, 2014|Categories: Featured Post, KCPL, Outreach|0 Comments

Cooking With Kids

Dinner. The word strikes fear into my heart.  I have to cook it almost every day.  In the most stressful times I will find myself stuck in a cooking rut faced with whiney children.  What’s a parent to do? Cook with the kids. Request this book! It’s a bit counterintuitive because it definitely takes more time than cooking solo. However, when my children are invested in the meal through planning and effort we reap several benefits: Cooking becomes family time instead of a chore for Mom or Dad.  The children are excited to eat the dinner they helped prepare  We tend to eat healthier meals. Ready to try it out? Plan: Let your children (if they are old enough) help choose the meal to cook. You can browse cookbooks or websites together or just ask them for their ideas.  In our home, I prompt them to include seasonal fruits and veggies, or let them know ingredients we have on hand. Even letting them choose from a list pre-approved by me makes them feel more invested in the meal. Request this book! Prep:  The last thing you want to do when you are cooking with children is fumble around for equipment and ingredients.  An advantage of planning is that it gives me a grocery list.  We go through our recipe together and get out what we need. Even my 8 year old still needs a footstool, and everybody gets an apron. Read the recipe as you go: When you model reading directions it helps your child’s reading development.  Directional reading requires different reading skills than reading a story.  If your children are reading independently, let them read the recipe to you. Be [...]

Cooking with the Library Month – Kentucky Inspired Cooking

July is Cooking Month at the Kenton County Public Library and today’s blog focuses on what’s available from the Local History and Genealogy Department in Covington. Kenton County South 4-H Cookbook In Honor of Kentucky's Bicentennial. We really love the Heritage recipe section with recipes by grandparents. This cookbook can be checked out at the Kenton County Public Library. Do you know how to make jellied chicken? How about hominy puffs? Have you ever had Bouilli soup? You can find recipes for these and other unusual and delicious regional dishes in our cookbook collection located in the local history and genealogy department. Many of our books can serve as historical sketches of the region. It’s interesting to see some of the older recipes like one for Kentucky burgout from The Blue Grass Cook Book that calls for “6 squirrels and 6 birds” or what was included in the book’s recipe for a “very fine omelet.” But, while many of our cookbooks are a glimpse into kitchens of the past, there’s no reason you shouldn’t try to make some of these delicious concoctions in your own home. If you’re looking for a challenge, you might want to try a recipe from The Kentucky Housewife by Lettice Bryan. This compilation uses a paragraph format for each dish instead of the list presentation that is commonly used in today’s cookbooks. It also calls for measurements and techniques that are atypical in today’s modern kitchen, but don’t let that scare you. In fact, we highly recommend the “plain potato soup” on page 24. Why not give one of the books below a try (or another from our four shelves of cookbooks in the local history department)? The Blue Grass Cook Book – K 641.5975 [...]

Countdown to Cincinnati Reds’ Opening Day 2016

Photograph from www.myfountainsquare.com With the 2016 Opening Day rapidly approaching for the Cincinnati Reds, below are some fun facts and interesting stats about the professional baseball team just north of the Ohio River. Cincinnati boasts the first professional baseball team and for decades hosted the initial game of the Major League Baseball season. The Reds’ first of 162 regular season games is on April 4th. Getting excited for the first day of the new baseball season is a long-standing tradition for people in the greater-Cincinnati area. Former Reds’ catcher Joe Oliver said, “A lot of clubs have great openers...but I never saw an Opening Day that got the attention of an entire city the way the Reds opener does.” The legendary Sparky Anderson, the winningest manager in Reds’ history, explained, “It’s a holiday—a baseball holiday! Ain’t no other place in America got that!” The Findlay Market Opening Day Parade has been going strong since 1920 and is an excuse for many locals to suddenly feel too sick to go to work or school, but somehow well enough to attend the parade and baseball game. Cincinnati native and former Red Buddy Bell stated: “If you don't try to get out of school on Opening Day, there's something wrong with you! It's right up there with Christmas.” [Not that I’m advocating truancy!] Though many baseball experts predict Cincinnati will finish dead last in their division this year–let’s hope they are terribly mistaken–fans never know what will happen. That is why they play the games; each season is a fresh, exciting beginning. Said Hall of Fame pitcher Don Sutton: “I loved opening the baseball season in Cincinnati. It is a sea of red…I remember thinking, ‘Yeah, [...]

Covington Library Stats & Stories – One Year Later

Covington Library Stats & Stories – Snapshots of the revitalization of Covington Library One Year Later The Covington Library is one of those unique places. Smack in the center of an urban renewal. It’s one of the few places in Northern Kentucky where you can see people struggling to survive sitting next to a Federal judge. All are welcomed, none are judged. This month marks one year since the Covington Library has been fully operational after a 24 month expansion and renovation. A few questioned the need for expansion; citing books were a thing of the past. That couldn’t be further from the case. Since 2013, the Covington Library has seen a tremendous amount of use and has radically impacted the community and the people it serves. The following is a brief snapshot on how the Covington Library remains relevant not only by providing books, materials and services, but also by being a critical part of the Northern Kentucky Community. Before & After Circulation Desk Stats and stories The Kenton County Public Library records statistics on the fiscal year, beginning July 1 and ending June 30 of the following calendar year. Here is a look at the statistics for the Covington Library for July 1, 2013 through June 30, 2014: Circulation of items for adults: 413,076 (up 31%) Circulation of items for children: 92,461 (up 25%) Overall circulation of items including books, movies, music , magazines and more: 505,537 (up 29%) 1,618 programs for adults, teens and children were offered including computer classes, book discussions, job skills education, storytimes, literacy enrichment and more. 37,595 people attended these programs. Volunteers contributed 2,516 hours to the Covington Library, a value of $45,061.56 Staff [...]

Covington Walking Tours Available During #92daysofSummer

The Covington Bicentennial is in full swing and the Local History and Genealogy Department is ready with a new FREE walking tour! Join a member of the Local History and Genealogy Department each Wednesday at 10 a.m. for a tour of the neighborhood around the library. The tour highlights and explores the people who lived in the neighborhoods around the Library 100 years ago in 1915. You'll learn about Covington's northern and southern heritage, architecture, and diverse commercial history. We'll also explore some of the forgotten and lost buildings that once proudly stood in the neighborhood. The tour is roughly a mile long, and comfortable clothing and shoes are recommended. Large groups, and anyone requiring special accommodations should contact the Local History and Genealogy Department a week in advance of the program at 859-962-4070. Here is a sneak peak into one of the stories you'll discover during the tour. The Lovell-Graziani house at 326 E 2nd Street, formerly 174 E 2nd Street Lovell-Graziani House 2015   Benjamin F. Graziani occupied 174 E 2nd Street in 1915. The house dates to the late 1870s, built in French Victorian style by Howell Lewis Lovell, of the tobacco business. Graziani was born in 1858 in Cold Spring, KY, the youngest of nine children to Italian immigrants. His father died in a steamboat explosion when Graziani was only eight years old. He attended Cincinnati Law School and graduated in 1882. In time, Graziani grew to be one of the most prominent attorneys in Covington during the late 19th and early 20th century, often appearing in the newspapers as a “promising young lawyer” at the start of his career. He worked as a criminal attorney, keeping an office building [...]

Craig Street Burying Ground: Gone But Not Forgotten

From the City Atlas of Covington, Kentucky 1877 on page 22. Atlas is available in the Local History and Genealogy Department. “The cemetery is a memorial and a record. It is not a mere field in which the dead are stowed away unknown; it is a touching and beautiful history, written in family burial photos, in mounded graves, in sculptured and inscribed monuments. It tells the story of the past- not of its institutions, or its wars, or its ideas, but of its individual lives, of its men and women and children, and of its household. It is silent, but eloquent; it is common, but it is unique. We find no such history elsewhere; there are no records in all the wide world in which we can discover so much that is suggestive, so much that is pathetic and impressive.” –Joseph Anderson Autumn is here, and while we listen close for the things that go bump in the night, there is no better way to spend the bright hours of a crisp fall day than a stroll through a cemetery in the fresh October air. If you missed our Linden Grove Cemetery Tour in September, the cemetery is always open until five for a self-guided experience. While it holds great historical significance, Linden Grove is not the oldest cemetery in Covington. Few remember the town’s first graveyard: The Craig Street Burying Ground.  Now an unassuming plot of land, anchored into the background by the 6th Street underpass and zipped shut by the old C&O Railroad Bridge approach, it was once the final resting place of those first to call Covington home. Let us then relate these distant memories, lest we forget something so [...]

December 24 & 25

All locations of the Library will be closed December 24 & 25.  However you can still access great books, video and audiobooks on our site.       Have you used Hoopla?  We have some great suggestions over on our 25 Days of e-Christmas blog.  Hoopla content is always available!  No waiting and no fines!           Looking for a great read?  Many of your favorite authors and hot new titles are over at our ebook site Overdrive.   Can't decide what to read?  Check out the titles on our Hot Reads blog or A Wynk, A Blynk and a Nod to Books for children's books.      

DIY Ornaments

Creating your own ornaments will make your Christmas tree all the more special!  Years later, you can look back and remember how much fun it was to create them.  The Kenton County Public Library can help you make those memories.   Along with all of the materials you can check out to inspire your holiday creations, we have many free events for all ages.               Books available from the Kenton County Public Library to inspire your Holiday crafting:                                What are you waiting for?  Get crafting and make some memories!

By |December 4th, 2015|Categories: Featured Post, KCPL|0 Comments

DIY Prom

DIY PROM It’s prom time, so let’s talk about hair and makeup! If there’s one thing I (Jessy the Librarian) love as much as stories, it’s probably lipstick. Or maybe eyeliner. One of the best place I’ve found for (non-video) makeup/hair tutorials is The Beauty Department. I love the idea of a metallic eye, especially if your dress is more of a matte texture, like tulle. Continue Reading the Blog Post

By |April 16th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on DIY Prom

Do You Judge a Book by its Cover?

Have you ever picked out a book based on the cover? The cover draws you in (whether it's the design, color, title, pictures, etc.) and you take it with you while not even knowing the synopsis. This situation happens quite a bit whether you are at the library, shopping at a bookstore or even online. Sometimes the opposite even happens and you might be turned away from a book based on the cover because it looks boring or unattractive. Book covers are very important. Let's be honest, we judge books by their covers everyday! Looking for some book recommendations with striking covers? Take a look below! The following list is a mix of old/current books (Adult, Children's and Young Adult). American War (by: Omar El Akkad) Astrophysics for People in a Hurry (by: Neil DeGrasse Tyson) Borne (by: Jeff Vandermeer) The Night Gardener (by: Terry and Eric Fan) A Separation (by: Katie Kitamura) White Tears (by: Hari Kunzru) Breadcrumbs (by: Anne Ursu) How to Murder your Life (by: Cat Marnell) Exit West (by: Mohsin Hamid) The Goldfinch (by: Donna Tartt) Red Queen (by: Victoria Aveyard) Cannibals In Love (by: Mike Roberts) Appetites Cookbook (by: Anthony Bourdain) Commonwealth (by: Ann Patchett) The Girl Who Fell From The Sky (by: Heidi W. Durrow)   Visit one of our three library locations to check out one of these books and take a look at one of our many book displays! You never know -- you might pick up your next favorite book based on it's cover. Looking for more book suggestions? Check out BookUs to connect with a librarian and get book recommendations.      

By |November 16th, 2017|Categories: Featured Post|0 Comments

DUKE Energy Becomes a Partner in Library’s STEM Efforts

If you have driven by the Erlanger Branch Library recently, you may have wondered what’s going on. Last fall, construction started on three projects at the branch: a makerspace, a large auditorium/meeting room and a separate building to house the administration offices. Far left Executive Director, Dave Schroeder, Board of Trustees (left to right): Douglas Stephens, Louise Canter, Susan Mospens, Casey Ruschman (Duke Energy), Julie Roesel Belton, Dan Humpert On Tuesday, May 15, Duke Energy gave a big boost to this anxiously awaited project. Duke Energy presented the Kenton County Public Library Board of Trustees with a $10,000 grant that will go towards materials and equipment for the new makerspace. Republic Bank was the first sponsor of the makerspace with a donation of $5,000. Schultz Marketing and Communications and The Lawrence Firm, PSC, have also contributed.   Many ask “what is a makerspace?”  By definition, it is a place in which people with shared interests, especially in computing or technology, can gather to work on projects while sharing ideas, equipment, and knowledge. The Library provides the space, equipment and materials, and visitors are the makers.   The Library’s Executive Director Dave Schroeder explains why this space is so important.  “As we look toward the future, we realize there is great need for a stronger focus to provide STEM and STEAM related activities.  STEAM is an educational approach to learning that uses Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts and Mathematics as access points for guiding student inquiry, dialogue, and critical thinking[1].  However we at the Library have realized that while STEM and STEAM are wonderful movements, there is one critical component being left out – reading.”   Schroeder goes on to explain, “Without having a strong [...]

Election Year Children’s Books

Duck for President by Doreen Cronin ; illustrated by Betsy Lewin From the duo that brought us Click, Clack, Moo, Farmer Brown’s Duck pursues the highest office in the land.     President Taft is Stuck in the Bath by Mac Barnett ; illustrated by Chris Van Dusen This is a fictionalized account of President William Howard Taft, a man of great stature, who according to some got stuck in his bath on his inauguration day. Others say it happened later in his term, while many say Taft never got stuck at all. Nevertheless, this is a fun read about our 27th president! Lillian's right to vote : a celebration of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 by Jonah Winter A 50th anniversary tribute to the Voting Rights Act of 1965 finds an elderly woman reflecting on her family's history, from the passage of the 15th Amendment through her participation in the protest march from Selma to Montgomery.   Of Thee I Sing : a Letter to My Daughters by Barack Obama ; illustrated by Loren Long Illustrated by local artist, Loren Long, this book is a tribute to thirteen great Americans and their achievements, including the patriotism of George Washington, the courage of Jackie Robinson, and the strength of Helen Keller. This is a very moving book with stunning illustrations. My Name Is James Madison Hemings by Jonah Winter This historical picture book about the life of the child of Thomas Jefferson and his slave, Sally Hemings, brings to light the many contradictions in Jefferson s life and legacy.   Have a Mice Flight! Lindsey Leavitt ; illustrated by Ag Ford This is the third book in the Commander in Cheese chapter book series [...]