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Expanded Online Access to the Kentucky Post Available

The Kenton County Public Library is proud to offer for a limited time expanded coverage of the Kentucky Post. The new  database offered through NewsBank is keyword searchable and includes digitized images of the paper between 1895-1962. The database is available for free from inside any branch of the Kenton County Public Library system. Also, the database can be accessed from home for free with your Kenton County Public Library card. To access the Kentucky Post database follow these instructions: Visit: www.kentonlibrary.org/genealogy Click on Research Tools Click on Kentucky Post If you are outside of the Library - enter your Library card number Under the Heading "America's News - Historical and Current" click on "Kentucky Post Historical and Current" From this screen you can search the database. This search also covers the text only access for the Kentucky Post from 1990-2013 Questions or comments? Contact the Local History and Genealogy Department at (859)962-4070 or via email at history@kentonlibrary.org  

Signed, Sealed, Delivered: The Courting of Ginny Hilton

  Valentine, sent in February of 1929. Hail February, the month of roses and lace and stamps on Valentine cards; a prime time for a story of Northern Kentucky Love! Here’s one: Bernard Wright Southgate Jr., son of Bernard Wright Southgate Sr. and Lallie Kennedy, married Virginia D. Hilton on the 17th of September in 1929. Romantic, I suppose, if a bit dry. One can sit at any of our computers and find that information on Ancestry.com for free, like I just did.   However, what Ancestry doesn’t have is much more interesting. Now available on geNKY, the Southgate courtship letters tell a much more relatable tale. Virginia Southgate (at the time, a Hilton) kept all the letters Bernard sent her through their extensive five-year courtship, even as they both attended school and changed residences. Even though we can only hear his half of the conversation, we have a unique look into the fancies and follies between postmarks and biographical milestones. The first letter is dated the 11th of May, in 1924, from Buffalo, West Virginia, and in it, he writes that he was surprised to receive her letter. It is quite possible (and in fact, likely, from the way he describes her personality in his future notes) that Virginia wrote first.  He does tell us she even illustrated her letters! Unfortunately, we do not possess any of those, though there are a few doodles to be seen at the bottom corner of some pages, like a Tokyo sunrise, and a black cat in a dark cellar at midnight. Bernard is modest about his artistic talents. Virginia, or, as he refers to her, “Ginny”,  starts out in her family home at 15 Calhoun St., [...]

Over 100,000 Local Historical Photos Available Online

Over 100,000 Kentucky Historical Photos Available Online They say a photo is worth a 1,000 words. If that’s true, then the Kenton County Public Library has 100 million stories to tell! The Library’s online historic photo album, Faces and Places, just added the 100,000th photo to its database. The photo, from the former Kentucky Post, is dated March 14, 1975 and features a man named Bill Penick. Why is Bill Penick’s photo important? Because he, most likely inadvertently, is now forever a part of Kentucky history. This photo is just one of thousands preserved digitally for all to see, and share, online via the Faces and Places website, www.kentonlibrary.org/facesandplaces.   March 2016 marked the 10th anniversary of Faces and Places, a unique online historical photo album that highlights the people, places and events of Kentucky (and some Cincinnati).  Since its inception a decade ago, the Faces and Places website has received over 9.2 million views. There are 100,411 images, 6,508 subject headings and 2,023 comments on the photos. “Comments are important,” stated Elaine Kuhn, Local History & Genealogy Services Coordinator for the Library. “They give us information that might help someone discover something new when doing research.” This online album was created when the history staff at the Kenton County Public Library began digitizing some of its resources. They were digitizing documents and family files so that genealogy researchers around the world could obtain the information they needed without having to incur the cost of travel expenses. The staff then added photos to the mix, therefore creating Faces and Places.   The popularity of the photograph collection easily lent itself to a digital format. As such, staff scanned the photos and staff and volunteers did [...]

Licking Riverside Historic Walking Tour

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cP3aw2E0r2Q An eclectically-styled multifamily home on Garrard. Look for the two decorative panels with owls on the facade. Perhaps you’ve driven through Covington’s Licking Riverside neighborhood many times, but have you ever taken the time to stroll along tree-lined Garrard Street or admired the slate shingles and ironwork on the homes of Greenup Street? This summer, the Local History and Genealogy department is presenting weekly tours that highlight the structures and stories of this historic neighborhood. The Licking Riverside Historic District was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1975. The district has many examples of different types of historic architecture that date from the mid-1800s to the early 20th century. The tour passes homes of the Greek Revival, Italianate, Bungalow, and eclectic Victorian Vernacular styles. Over a hundred years of architectural history often mingle on a single picturesque block. This victorian vernacular home on Greenup has Queen Anne inspired detailing such as the fish scale wall cladding and asymmetrical profile. Licking Riverside has been home many of Covington’s elite, including legislators, local political figures, doctors, and mayors. Many of the beautiful homes were also built as multifamily residences, apartments, and duplexes. It is also the home of the historic Covington Ladies Home at 702 Garrard, which was built in that location in 1894. Education and the arts are also prominent in the neighborhoods’ history. The Rugby at 622 Sanford Street began as Reverend William Orr’s Covington Female Seminary. Founded after 1856, the current building at 702 Greenup that was once La Salette Academy. Down the street, the Baker Hunt campus includes the former Covington Arts Club building and still continues the tradition of art instruction today. Along [...]

The Fort Ancient Mound Builders of Northern Kentucky

If you grew up on a farm in rural Northern Kentucky, you may have seen prehistoric stone artifacts that were churned up out of the earth by a plow prior to planting. We are fascinated with prehistoric peoples and their ways of life, and burial mounds are no exception. Mounds are quite common in the region and can be found throughout many Northern Kentucky and Southeast Ohio counties. With the help of archaeology, we have gotten to take a peek back in time into the daily life of the peoples who inhabited the region prior to European settlement. One of the many cultural groups that had a prehistoric presence in the Ohio Valley region was the Fort Ancient, believed to be an offshoot of the widespread Mississippian culture that dominated the Midwest and Southeast United States. The Fort Ancients lived in the region during the Late Prehistoric Period between 1000-1750 CE. Fort Ancient habitation sites are divided into three temporal spans (3): Fort Ancient prior to 1200 CE Middle Fort Ancient 1200-1400 CE Fort Ancient after 1400 CE They lived in small villages and relied on farming to cultivate most of their food, but also engaged in hunting, fishing, and gathering of wild plants (3). Fort Ancients organized their societies differently than the Mississippians, which is why we find fewer mounds of Fort Ancient origin (3) than Mississippian. Though the Fort Ancient were not the only ones, they were the most recent to build mounds in this region. Most notably, the Fort Ancients are known for their construction of the Alligator Mound in Licking County, Ohio and their modification of the Serpent Mound in Adams County, Ohio. Mound building may have served a number of functions for the Native Americans, including protection, observation, shelter, in addition ceremonial or sacrificial purposes and [...]

Historical Online Photo Database Celebrates a Decade of Service

This March 2016 marks the 10th anniversary of Faces and Places (www.kentonlibrary.org/genphotos) , a unique online historical photo album that highlights the people, places and events of Kentucky (and some Cincinnati).  Since its inception a decade ago, the Faces and Places website has received over 9.2 million views. There are nearly 85,000 photos, 6,435 subject headings and nearly 2,000 comments.   This online album was created when the history staff at the Kenton County Public Library started digitizing some of its resources. They were digitizing documents and family files so that genealogy researchers around the world could obtain the information they needed without having to incur the cost of travel expenses. The staff then added photos to the mix, therefore creating Faces and Places.   The popularity of the photograph collection easily lent itself to a digital format. As such, staff scanned and the photos and staff and volunteers did the indexing. When the Kentucky Post, a daily newspaper, ceased publication they donated over 60,000 photographs to the Kenton County Public Library. Staff and volunteers began adding those to the database, using keywords and subject headings to make searching easier.   Faces and Places is searchable by surname, address, city, or subject. As the database became more well-known in the community, other area residents began donating photos to the library. One of the more significant collections was a local photography studio who donated over 1,000 photographs of greater Cincinnati scenes from the 1930’s to the 1950’s. Because of the accessibility of the photographs through the database, many have been used by local authors, in local history books, by the media, by teachers and students and by museums and local businesses.   With images of Riverfront [...]

Northern Kentucky All-Stars

The region is at the eve of the Mid-Summer Classic or to the casual baseball fan the Major League Baseball All-Star Game. Cincinnati and the region are set to take center stage as baseball’s best converge to face off on the diamond. What ties does Northern Kentucky have to the All-Star Game? Since the All-Star Game was first played in 1933 Northern Kentucky has had a handful of native sons break into the majors. A larger portion played before the inception of the All-Star Game. Thus we cannot really discuss them in the terms of being all-stars; many of them had fine careers that may have been all-star worthy. However a small number have stood out since then and were selected to the All-Star Game. We will talk about four individuals in this article. Two were from Northern Kentucky; well one was from Fleming County which is a neighbor of Mason County which is part of Northern Kentucky but it is close enough and we could argue all sorts of technicalities but he counts, the other was from Campbell County. The third player was born and raised in Cincinnati but played baseball in high school and college here in Northern Kentucky. The fourth was an umpire from Kenton County. So who were they? Jim Bunning, Woodie Fryman and David Justice were the players selected more than once in their careers to the All-Star Game. The umpire selected as an All-Star was Randy Marsh also a Northern Kentucky native. Jim Bunning from Southgate, Kentucky played professionally from 1955-1971. He was a 9 time All-Star. While playing for the Detroit Tigers Jim was selected to the American League squad 7 times (1957, 1959 and 1961, [...]

Expanded Local History & Genealogy Dpt at Covington Library

The Local History and Genealogy Department has opened in its new space at the Covington location of the Kenton County Public Library. The department is now located on the top floor, and is staffed all hours when the library is open. The department’s collection includes Kentucky Biographies, Kentucky Fiction, Kentucky Non-Fiction, Kentucky Reference (containing numerous books on many Kentucky counties), city and business directories dating back to the 1830s, maps, and many more resources for doing genealogy and history research. Come enjoy the quiet workspace and dig deeper into your family history!                     Looking south in the Local History and Genealogy Department. The chairs and tabletops from the Carnegie library were refurbished and used in the new space. Beth uses one of the microfilm machines to look up newspaper articles. Need a map? The department has city, county, regional and state maps of Kentucky. If you’re interested in accessing online databases such as Ancestry.com, geNKY, or Faces and Places, we have eight new computers dedicated to this purpose. Staff members are readily available to assist you with using these resources. Check out our video of the new department! Have you visited the new department yet? Let us know what you think!

Researching Your Family History

Looking to restart your genealogy research in the New Year? The library has many resources for your family history quest. If you just getting started on your research the best way to start a family history project is to fill out a family tree. You can fill out a tree yourself or recruit your parents, grandparents and other family members to help. It may be helpful to ask your relatives where they were born, where they were married and other life events. Remember to take legible notes and keep good records of all the information you collect.  Having legible well documented notes will be helpful later in your research. Now that you have collected information for your family tree it is time to research. Start by going to Local History and Genealogy  and exploring all the resources available to genealogists. You will find links to commonly used research sites including Ancestry.com, and Familysearch.org. For more localized research check out the Northern Kentucky Newspaper Index, Faces and Places Northern Kentucky Photograph Archives and geNKY. Looking for additional resources that may not be available online? Head to the Covington branch and utilize the collection of local history and genealogy books. We have books that cover vital records, county histories, cemetery internments and much more! You may also want to look through our Family Files and Local History Files to assist with your research. For more tips, and suggestions on genealogy or local history check out our Pinterest page and watch this video. What family history tips do you have to share? This post was written by Cierra Earl This blog was updated December 2013.