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Make Your Own Valentine Gifts

There are hundreds of Valentine’s Day cards that you can buy in the store but we all know that it means more to receive a gift that someone made themselves. So, why not sit down with your child and make cards or gifts to give to classmates and loved ones? We have put together a Pinterest board filled with ideas for different crafts to make with your child. One of my favorites is the Tootsie Pop superhero Valentine, shown here. It comes with a printable template that you can use to make masks and capes for the pops.

It is important that you find an idea that your child is excited about so that they enjoy making the gifts. Remember to consider their age and make sure they will be able to help make the gifts. Our Pinterest board has ideas for using candy, goldfish crackers, glow sticks and more! After deciding what you are going to make, prepare the supplies you will need. Make sure you set aside time to do this ahead of time because the pressure of making cards the night before Valentine’s Day will not be fun for you or your child!

Once you have the supplies you need, sit down with your child or children and allow them to do as much as they are able to do so that it feels personal to them and they feel a part of the process. They don’t need to look perfect to be the perfect Valentine gift.

Grandparents also love child-made gifts. Why not give them a special memento of their place in your child’s heart. Here’s a sweet idea from our pinterest board:

When it is time to pass these gifts out, your child will […]

By |January 27th, 2015|Categories: Featured Post, KCPL||0 Comments

What’s New at the Library in 2015?

The Kenton County Library is planning for 2015!

A new year brings new opportunities for any organization and the Library is no exception.  One of the biggest changes patrons will see in the coming year is the renovation of the Erlanger Branch.  The branch has been open for over 12 years and has seen foot traffic of more than 5.5 million visitors.  As you can imagine, this puts a lot of wear and tear on the building.  A number of the chairs in the building have already been replaced and refinished.  Currently, many of the floor coverings are also being replaced.  This includes all of the carpets in the building.  Can you imagine a carpet that has been walked on by the feet of over 5.5 million people?  We are replacing some of the carpeting with industrial squares that will be more durable and more easily replaced.  Other high traffic areas will be replaced with rubber tile.  These two fixes will give a new and fresh look to the building and cut down dramatically on trip hazards.  Later in the year we hope to be able to paint the interior of the building.

The Library will also be working on meeting the goals of its strategic plan.  In 2015, we will be focusing on three major initiatives.  Our Children’s Departments and Outreach Department will be focusing on increasing attendance at programs that promote early childhood literacy which is so important to our families and community.  Currently our staff visit practically every public, private and parochial school in the county.  We will be working diligently to increase these visits and encourage students to use our traditional and online materials in their school work.  We will also be […]

Ring In the New Year with Old Favorites

Are you looking for a good read, some new to you music, a great movie or an awesome book to introduce your children to? The Kenton County Public Library has you covered with the top items checked out in 2014. 

Top adult fiction books checked out in 2014:

1. Sycamore Row, by John Grisham

2. Gone Girl, by Gillian Flynn

3. The Invention of Wings, by Sue Kidd

4. First Love, by James Patterson

5. Dark Witch, by Nora Roberts

Top YA fiction books checked out in 20141. Divergent, by Veronica Roth

2. The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green

3. Catching Fire, by Suzanne Collins

4. The Hunger Games, by Suzanne Collins

5. Insurgent, by Veronica Roth

Top DVDS checked out in 2014:

1. The Hunger Games, Catching Fire

2. Gravity

3. Despicable Me 2

4. Man of Steel

5. Thor, The Dark World

Top songs downloaded from Freegal:

1. Happy (Gru’s Theme from Despicable Me 2)

2. All of Me

3. All About That Bass

4. Rude

5. Say Something

Top children’s books checked out in 2014:

1. Greg Heffley’s Journal, by Jeff Kinney

2. The Last Straw, by Jeff Kinney

3. Rodrick Rules, by Jeff Kinney

4. Dog Days, by Jeff Kinney

5. The Ugly Truth, by Jeff Kinney

Top children’s video games checked out in 2014:

1. Kirby’s Dream Collection Special Edition

2. Planes

3. Super Mario Galaxy

4. MarioKart

5. Sonic Unleashed

Top adult video games checked out in 2014:

1. Lego Marvel Super Heroes

2. The Lego Movie

3. Injustice Gods Among Us

4. Titanfall

5. Plants vs. Zombies Garden Warfare

Want to check out some of these items? Visit the library catalog to the put the items on hold. Have you read, watched or listened to any of these items? Which was your favorite?

Our Favorite Children’s Books of 2014

The days are counting down on not only  the holiday season, but the end of the year. If you’re still looking for that final, perfect gift for the special child (or children) in your life, check out some favorite picks of this past year from Covington Children’s Librarians , Amy Schardein & Krista King-Oaks.

For children ages 0-4:

Flashlight – Liz Boyd

A child explores the night with his flashlight – cleverly illuminating a partially hidden world.  Lovely details and a simple storyline make this book one to be enjoyed again and again.

Mix It Up – Herve Tullet 

Herve Tullet is the master of playful interactive books and this one does not disappoint. Young readers are invited to touch and rub and tilt colors together in this clever book.

Tickle- Leslie Patricelli

This sweet little board book simply shows a baby enjoying a tickle fest with the family and presents an irresistible opportunity to tickle your own little one.

For children ages 5-8:

Ivan: The Remarkable True Story of the Shopping Mall Gorilla – Katherine Applegate

Author Katherine Applegates won the Newbery award for her novel The One and Only Ivan.  Now readers can learn the facts behind the novel in this fascinating look at a captive gorilla.

Lily the Unicorn – Dallas Clayton

If you are a fan of Elephant and Piggie, then you will fall in love with Lily and her penguin friend Roger in their colorful adventure of learning about feelings and friendship and all their favorite things that make the world “awesome”.

Weasels – Elys Dolan

If I-Spy and Where’s Waldo made a book, but filled it with mischievous critters, it would be Dolan’s quirky masterpiece; so many zany and hilarious illustrations fill this minimalist picture book that  will keep readers busy discovering the jokes long after the story […]

Bygone Buildings: Covington’s Changing Cityscape

Have you ever driven past an empty lot and wondered what was there before the asphalt and crabgrass? A surface lot, or even a new building in the heart of Covington, was likely erected upon the spot where another building once stood. Covington’s built environment has many intact and preserved buildings dating back as far as the early 1800s, but you might find a photo of a building in Faces and Places that you don’t recognize that was lost to development, fire, or perceived obsolescence. Here are a few examples of buildings of historic and stylistic distinction that once stood in Covington, but are now gone.

Holmes’ Castle is likely the most well-known example of lost architecture in Covington. This palatial home was the second location of Covington Public High School. The high school was originally located on Russell Street, near 12th Street, and was also torn down. Holmes’ Castle was built by Daniel Henry Holmes, a wealthy retailer. It was designed in the Gothic Revival style, which can be identified by its pointed arch windows and church-like details. With its sprawling grounds and lavishly appointed interior, Holmesdale was not D. H. Holmes’ only residence, and in 1915 (seventeen years after his death), his surviving family sold the property to the Covington School Board. The high school was moved into the residence until 1936, when it was razed and a new building constructed in its place. The décor and furnishings that remained were auctioned, and what didn’t sell was unceremoniously burned in the football field.

The Amos Shinkle Mansion is one particularly polarizing example of Gothic Revival architecture that once stood at 165 E. 2nd Street—people seem to either find it grand and exciting, or stuffy […]

Quick ‘n’ Easy Halloween Costumes

Don’t know what you want to be for Halloween yet? Here’s 10 quick and simple ideas to try!

Starbucks drink

Tape a starbucks logo to a brown dress, white feather boa for foam, add some gold ribbon if you like caramel sauce

Hello Not a Kitty

Did you hear? The Sanrio corporation has said that their most famous cat is actually not a kitty—she’s a human girl! Wear a red skirt, white shirt, put a big bow in your hair, and get very angry at anyone who asks if you’re a cat.

Ash Ketchum

Gotta catch ‘em all! White collared shirt, blue vest, green fingerless gloves, and a red and white baseball cap. Not included: your very own Jigglypuff.

Cactus

Poke some white pipe cleaners through green clothing

Old Timey Bank Robber

Black and white striped shirt, black pants, black knit cap, paint a dollar sign on a bag for your loot

Medusa

Stick some plastic snakes in your hair with bobby pins and wear something flowing.

Be your own evil twin with a mustache and goatee!

http://powerisunderstanding.blogspot.com/2012/05/cut-out-your-darkest-timeline-beard.html

101 Dalmations

Get all your friends together and draw black spots on white outfits. Bonus points if you find a Cruella DeVille!

Hearts for eyes cat emoji

Yellow outfit, cat ears, heart sunglasses

By |October 22nd, 2014|Categories: KCPL, teens||0 Comments

Job Skills Help at the Library

Do you see yourself or a friend in any of the following scenarios?

Downsized professional?
Stay at home parent returning to the workforce?
Thinking about changing careers?
Recent college graduate and no job?
Looking to grow your current job skills?

Then think of the Kenton County Public Library as Job Search Central. The library has a myriad of resources available to aid you in your job search and help you grow your career skills. Turn to the library’s Job Search Central web site to find  to find the best and most up-to-date books on the Job Search Hunt, Career Change, writing powerful resumes, composing strong cover letters and developing fresh interviewing skills. The site will also connect you with local networking organizations, upcoming job fairs, and links to the most respected on-line job hunting and career assessment sites. Register for one of the library’s Job Search One-on-One sessions to get specialized help in a small group setting from an expert staff member. Learn about job opportunities and community resources available to you.

If you know someone struggling to gain critical computer skills, the library also offers regular live classes for First Time Computer Users, plus sessions on MS Word, Excel & PowerPoint. Finding it difficult to locate the time and money needed to train yourself in pricey software applications? You can take advanced classes in computer applications, business, design, personal development and other areas, via Gale Courses on the library’s web site for free. The classes are self-paced and require your library card number and PIN.

Save time, save money and get the support you need for your job search at the Kenton County Public Library today!

 

By |October 17th, 2014|Categories: KCPL||0 Comments

Caring for Seniors During the Holidays

With all the hustle and bustle the holiday seasons brings it can become overwhelming quickly and we can easily forget about those who may need extra attention during the holiday season. The holidays can be tough for senior citizens who may not be able to attend holiday parties (due to physical limitations) or travel to see their family (health conditions prevent them from flying or driving for long periods). Holidays can also bring back fond and emotional memories of loved ones passed. These memories can make the holidays tough to get through. You may find that some of your senior friends, neighbors or those you work with moods have changed. During the holiday season it is not uncommon for senior citizens to experience the holiday blues.

With the holidays approaching I cannot help but think of the Homebound patrons the Kenton County Public Library Outreach department serves. Some of our patrons have no family or their family members live out of town. So, what can we do to help our patrons, senior neighbors, grandparents and our senior friends through the holidays? Listed below and some tips on how to cheer up senior citizens during the holiday season.

Sit and chat with them for a while. You might be the only human contact they have throughout the holiday season. Allow them to reminisce about holidays past.
Holiday cards: Send a holiday card to your neighbor, friend or relative who may be alone for the holiday season. Let them know you are thinking about them and you wish the very best holiday season. I can tell you from experience this can really make their day and they will talk about it for months afterwards.
Invite them over for a holiday […]

By |October 14th, 2014|Categories: Featured Post, KCPL, Outreach||0 Comments

Celebrate Your Heritage During Family History Month – October 2014

October is Family History Month, and what better time to celebrate your family’s heritage!

Tracing the heritage of your family can produce so many insights into the struggles and the accomplishments of one’s ancestors – the story of why your family came to live in a certain place, how family members learned a trade, what religious, fraternal or civic organizations your ancestors belonged to, what sort of awards and recognitions your ancestors received, who might be your distant cousins. With the ever-increasing amount of information available in print and online, researching the lives of your predecessors has never been easier – and more complicated at the same time! So, where to begin?

The best way to begin a family history project is to start in the present and work backwards in time – from the known to the unknown. Gather up any family documents, talk to older relatives, and peruse family photographs. Look for birth, marriage, and death information on your family members, as these are the “building blocks” of a family tree. As you work your way backwards in time, also take note of family friends, neighbors and associates. Knowing about them can sometimes provide clues to your own family’s stories.

But what do you do when you finally hit that “brick wall” in your research? What steps can you take to discover more about your ancestors’ lives? To help you with your research and in honor of Family History Month, the Local History and Genealogy department is offering a variety of programs in October to enhance your family heritage sleuthing.

The month begins with a program titled, “Did He Say Regiment, Squadron, Battalion, Destroyer or Attack Transport?” presented by Bill Stolz on Thursday, October 2nd at […]

Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps: The Earliest “Street View”

Have you wondered what your town or neighborhood looked like 100 years ago? Want to know what that large building at the end of your block was originally used for? If you answered yes, you will want to check out the Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps. In 1867, the Sanborn Map Company, which is still in business today, began making detailed fire insurance maps to help “insurance agents determine the degree of hazard associated with a particular property.”[i] The Sanborn Company estimates they created maps for 12,000 cities and towns in the United States[ii]. The maps are very intricate and detail the size, shape, placement and number of windows and doors, property boundaries, and type of business or industry located within a structure. They are also coded to reflect the various types of building material used and to distinguish residential from commercial property.

While the maps are no longer used for insurance purposes, they are now a wonderful way to supplement your historical and genealogical research. They are also essential tools for anyone interested in the history of their home or a particular structure. The maps can be used in conjunction with city directories and newspapers to locate the homes of individuals or businesses in a town and even on a specific street. Because the maps were constantly updated, researchers can track changes that took place in towns, business districts, and neighborhoods. Street addresses and street names have also changed over time, and sometimes more than once, so the maps are an excellent way to find the original address for a specific home or business.

The Local History and Genealogy Department, located on the 2nd floor of the Covington Branch, has Sanborn Maps in original map format, […]