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Twelve Myths & Truths about College

It’s that time of year again… It’s time for 17-year-olds to make one of the biggest financial decisions of their lives. It’s time for these kids to decide what they are going to do for the rest of their lives. It’s time for seniors in high school to choose a college.

My daughter had to make these decisions last year. She began her freshman year of college at Northern Kentucky University last month. I’m going to tell you some of the things you are going to be told your child must do and then I’m going to tell you the truth based on our experience.

 

 

 

 

Things Other People, Including High School Guidance Counselors, are Going to Tell You and Your Children:

You should apply to five to seven schools to make sure you get accepted to one.
You should apply to schools you know you can’t afford.
There are plenty of scholarships out there and you’ll be sure to find one.
You can wait until after you graduate to make a final decision on which college you will attend.
Students with high GPAs and ACT scores will get a full ride.
You have to live on campus to get the full college experience.
You will find some way to pay for college, even if it’s loans.
College is really the only way to make something of yourself.
Books will cost at least $1,000 a semester.
Don’t fill out the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) if you know your child won’t qualify for free grants.
Your EFC (Expected Family Contribution) is what you should be able to pay toward your child’s college.
You can’t receive new scholarships after you started college.

 

The Truth Based on Our Experience:

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September Hot Reads

The World of Tomorrow by Brendan Matthews

June 1939. Francis Dempsey and his shell-shocked brother Michael are on an ocean liner from Ireland bound for their brother Martin’s home in New York City, having stolen a small fortune from the IRA. During the week that follows, the lives of these three brothers collide spectacularly with big-band jazz musicians, a talented but fragile heiress, a Jewish street photographer facing a return to Nazi-occupied Prague, a vengeful mob boss, and the ghosts of their own family’s revolutionary past.

When Tom Cronin, an erstwhile assassin forced into one last job, tracks the brothers down, their lives begin to fracture. Francis must surrender to blackmail, or have his family suffer fatal consequences. Michael, wandering alone, turns to Lilly Bloch, a heartsick artist, to recover his lost memory. And Martin and his wife, Rosemary, try to salvage their marriage and, ultimately, the lives of the other Dempseys.

From the smoky jazz joints of Harlem to the Plaza Hotel, from the garrets of artists in the Bowery to the shadowy warehouses of mobsters in Hell’s Kitchen, Brendan Mathews brings prewar New York to vivid, pulsing life, while the sweeping and intricate storytelling of this remarkable debut reveals an America that blithely hoped it could avoid another catastrophic war and focus instead on the promise of the World’s Fair: a peaceful, prosperous “World of Tomorrow.”

 

 

Caroline: Little House, Revisited by Sarah Miller

In this novel authorized by the Little House estate, Sarah Miller vividly recreates the beauty, hardship, and joys of the frontier in this dazzling work of historical fiction, a captivating story that illuminates one courageous, resilient, and loving pioneer woman as never before—Caroline Ingalls, “Ma” in Laura Ingalls Wilder’s beloved Little House books

In the […]

By |September 6th, 2017|Categories: Featured Post, KCPL||1 Comment

From the Head of Lettice: Recipes from Historic Kentucky Cookbooks Part One

When looking back on our favorite family memories and holidays, food is often a highlight. Nothing can be quite so nostalgic as Grandma’s cookies or Mom’s best soup. Here at the library, cookbooks are among our most circulated items. For those of you learning to cook or wanting to add some local flair to your home cooked meal, the Local History & Genealogy department has four shelves of cookbooks that you can check out, bring home, and test out. These range from local restaurants’ favorite recipes, to chefs who focus on modern Kentucky cuisine, to historic cookbooks written as early as the 1800s.

In an effort to get to know this section of our collection better, I tried out three recipes from two different books and documented my progress. I decided to focus on dishes with earlier origins. With some of the recipes, or receipts as Lettice Bryan of The Kentucky Housewife (1839) calls them, it took a little creative reimagining in order to modernize the measurements and equipment to something I have in my kitchen. In other words, I opted to bake in a modern oven with set temperatures. I’m also a vegetarian – so, sorry to all you Squirrel Soup lovers, I stuck to finding something I could enjoy!

Let’s get started:

Baked Potatoes, from The Kentucky Housewife (1839) by Lettice Bryan

This recipe is from one of our earliest cookbooks by the thorough Lettice Bryan. The collection contains thousands of recipes along with suggestions of accompanying dishes, for which meal a recipe works best, and other tidbits which give a wonderful glimpse of the time period. I chose this recipe because it is simple, contains few ingredients, but also takes a familiar dish in […]

Beat the Back to School Blues with Music from HooplaDigital

Divide – Ed Sheeran(Teen Choice Nominee)

Evolve – Imagine Dragons
(Teen Choice Nominee)

Kidz Bop 35 – Kidz Bop Kidz

Moana Soundtrack –  Various Artists

Descendants 2 – Various Artists

By |August 18th, 2017|Categories: Featured Post, KCPL||0 Comments

87 Years of Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky History Added to Kenton County Public Library Database

The Historical Cincinnati Enquirer Database now covers 1841-2009. The expanded date range offers 87 more years of Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky news coverage. The database contains digitized scans of the Cincinnati Enquirer, viewable in PDF format. The database is keyword searchable and also searchable by a specific date or page number. Articles can be saved to your computer or printed. Patrons can access the database at any branch of the Kenton County Public Library and at home with their Kenton County Public Library card.

If you are looking for something in the Kentucky Post, Kentucky Times-Star, or other Northern Kentucky newspapers, the Northern Kentucky Newspaper Index contains indexed entries to these newspapers. You can view the Kentucky Post and Kentucky Times-Star on microfilm, in the Local history and Genealogy Department at the Covington branch. The Local History and Genealogy Department is located on the upper level of the building.

Reach us at (859)962-4070 or history@kentonlibrary.org if you have questions about researching the database.

Cierra Earl, MA, Local History and Genealogy Programmer, Covington branch

August Hot Reads

See What I Have Done by Sarah Schmidt

In this riveting debut novel, See What I Have Done, Sarah Schmidt recasts one of the most fascinating murder cases of all time into an intimate story of a volatile household and a family devoid of love.

On the morning of August 4, 1892, Lizzie Borden calls out to her maid: Someone’s killed Father. The brutal ax-murder of Andrew and Abby Borden in their home in Fall River, Massachusetts, leaves little evidence and many unanswered questions. While neighbors struggle to understand why anyone would want to harm the respected Bordens, those close to the family have a different tale to tell—of a father with an explosive temper; a spiteful stepmother; and two spinster sisters, with a bond even stronger than blood, desperate for their independence.

As the police search for clues, Emma comforts an increasingly distraught Lizzie whose memories of that morning flash in scattered fragments. Had she been in the barn or the pear arbor to escape the stifling heat of the house? When did she last speak to her stepmother? Were they really gone and would everything be better now? Shifting among the perspectives of the unreliable Lizzie, her older sister Emma, the housemaid Bridget, and the enigmatic stranger Benjamin, the events of that fateful day are slowly revealed through a high-wire feat of storytelling.

Lizzie Borden took an ax
And gave her mother forty whacks
When she saw what she had done,
She gave her father forty-one.

Or did she?

The Driver by Hart Hanson

Michael Skellig is a limo driver waiting for his client in the alley behind an upscale hotel. He’s spent the last twenty-eight hours ferrying around Bismark Avila, a celebrity skateboard mogul who isn’t going home any time soon. Suddenly the […]

By |August 1st, 2017|Categories: Featured Post, KCPL||0 Comments

Twenty Years at Hogwarts

On Thursday, June 26, 1997, the world was forever changed. On this day, we mere muggles were blessed with the masterpiece that is Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone. On this date, the book was first published in the U.K. (It was later published in the U.S. in September 1998 under the title Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.) And I can tell you, from the first time I escaped into my favorite world, my life would never be the same.

For this children’s librarian, it’s always a huge humble-brag of mine to tell people I am a self-proclaimed “Harry Potter hipster.” As in, I read the books before they were cool (well, the first book at least). In August 1998, a month before the U.S. publication of Sorcerer’s Stone, I entered fourth grade. It was in this school year that I first recall discovering this book in my school library.

I was always an avid reader, and loved just browsing the shelves for books that “looked good”. I have a distinctive memory of finding this book on my school library’s shelf. I remember being attracted to the jewel tones of the book jacket illustration. Of being intrigued by the boy flying on a broomstick on the cover. Despite the old saying of “never judge a book by its cover” I totally did. I was pulled in. Who was this boy? What is the sorcerer’s stone? I had to know. And my world was never the same. From that fateful day in fourth grade, 10 year old me was changed. Definitely for the better.

Now, here we are 20 magical years later.

I know what some of you are thinking. Isn’t she a little old for Harry […]

Big Library Read – The Other Einstein

You still have a few days to join the #BigLibraryRead.  The Other Einstein examines the life of Albert Einstein’s first wife, and what role she may have played in his ideas.
Enjoy reading about the lives of women that have influenced of famous men?  Check out some historical fiction:

Loving Frank blends fact and fiction to tell the story of the love affair between Frank Lloyd Wright and Mamah Borthwick Cheney.

The Paris Wife follows the whirlwind relationship of Ernest Hemingway and Hadley Richardson.

Discover Anne Morrow and Charles Lindbergh’s high flying relationship.

 

By |June 23rd, 2017|Categories: Featured Post, KCPL||0 Comments

Historic Pike Street Corridor Walking Tour 2017

Pike Street was once the commercial and transportation heart of the city. It is named for the Lexington Turnpike that connected Covington and the markets of Cincinnati to farmers in the Bluegrass. The original and rustic route followed a historic buffalo trail (the original terminus of the Pike was to the southwest of Linden Grove Cemetery) until it was decided in the mid-1800s that the entire length of the turnpike would be improved to make it passable year-round. Once fully macadamized (a form of gravel paving), the turnpike brought travelers from Lexington up to Georgetown, across the Eagle Hills, over the Dry Ridge, into Northern Kentucky, and finally into the heart of Covington. Later, the railroad brought even more visitors and residents to Covington, who conducted business, shopped, lived, worked, and dined all along Pike Street.

Join us on a tour of historic Pike Street every Wednesday this summer. The tour begins in the Local History and Genealogy Department and features many striking buildings and landmarks for the mile loop. With over 150 years of history, the tour provides information about Covington’s commercial, transportation, brewing, distilling, and architectural history along this essential artery. Points of interest include the former location of the Covington Brewery, the Mutual Building, the Pike Street Arcade, Duveneck Square, the New England Distilling Company, the train station at Russell and Pike, and many more. Keep your eyes open for cool little hints of history, like Stewart Iron Works seals, ghost signs, and other bits of historic character. If you take photos of the tour, be sure to tag them @kentonlibrary and #kcplwalkingtour on Facebook and Instagram!

The tour leaves from the Local History and Genealogy Department at the Covington branch located at 502 Scott Boulevard […]

Free lunches at all Library locations this summer

The Kenton County Public Library has partnered with area school districts and the USDA Summer Food Service program to make sure that children do not go hungry this summer. Children under the age of 18 can go to any of the three Library locations for lunch during specified times. Anyone older than the age of 18 can purchase lunch at a reduced cost. Lunches are available to anyone regardless of income and begin the week of June 5.

According to Feeding America, when kids have empty stomachs, they don’t have the energy to focus, engage, learn and grow. The Library puts an army of effort into encouraging children to keep reading during the summer months so that they can stay on track when they return to school in the fall. Lise Tewes, Children’s Librarian for the Kenton County Public Library, says it makes sense to offer free lunches at the Library.

 

“In the summer months, our message is “read, read, read” but when you are hungry it’s hard to focus.  We do a lot of programs for children in mid-morning so it’s nice that they can go from a program, to picking out books then head over to lunch in one convenient place! We provide the location and the schools provide the food.”

 

While all three Library branches are offering lunches, days and times vary:

Covington Branch Library, Monday-Friday from June 5, 12:30-1 pm
Sponsored by the Covington Public School District
William E. Durr Branch Library, Wednesdays June & July starting June 7, noon-1 pm
Sponsored by the Kenton County School District
Erlanger Branch Library, Monday-Friday from June 5 through July 28, 11:30 am-1 pm
Sponsored by the Erlanger/Elsmere School District Food Service Department

 

The USDA Summer Food Service Program also sponsors […]

By |June 6th, 2017|Categories: KCPL, Uncategorized||0 Comments